South Congregational Church, Chapel, Ladies Parlor, and Rectory

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South Congregational Church (Former)
South Congregational Pres Court jeh.JPG
The Former South Congregational Church of Brooklyn
South Congregational Church, Chapel, Ladies Parlor, and Rectory is located in New York City
South Congregational Church, Chapel, Ladies Parlor, and Rectory
South Congregational Church, Chapel, Ladies Parlor, and Rectory is located in New York
South Congregational Church, Chapel, Ladies Parlor, and Rectory
South Congregational Church, Chapel, Ladies Parlor, and Rectory is located in the US
South Congregational Church, Chapel, Ladies Parlor, and Rectory
Location President and Court Sts., New York, New York
Coordinates 40°40′55″N 73°59′47″W / 40.68194°N 73.99639°W / 40.68194; -73.99639Coordinates: 40°40′55″N 73°59′47″W / 40.68194°N 73.99639°W / 40.68194; -73.99639
Area less than one acre
Built 1851, 1857, 1889, 1893
Architect ?, ?, F.C. Merry, and Woodruff Leeming
Architectural style Romanesque Revival architecture
NRHP reference # 82001183[1]
Added to NRHP November 4, 1982

The South Congregational Church is a former Congregational and United Church of Christ church building complex located on the intersection of Court and President Streets in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, New York City. The complex consisting of a church, original chapel, ladies parlour and rectory was landmarked by the Landmarks Preservation Commission on March 23, 1983.[2] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.[1]

The chapel was built 1851 and the church in 1857. The ladies parlor was built in 1889 to designs by English-American architect Frederick Charles Merry (d.1900) and the rectory building in 1893 to designs by architect Woodruff Leeming. The church is noteworthy as one of Brooklyn’s finest examples of the Early Romanesque Revival architectural style. The designers of the chapel and church remain unknown.[2][3] In 1874, the Rev. Dr. Albert Josiah Lyman became pastor of the South Church, Brooklyn, which church he served for forty-one years.[4]

The location is believed to have been selected by the famous preacher and abolitionist Henry Ward Beecher, father to author Harriet Beecher Stowe.[2] As of 2008, it had a well-preserved façade but had been adaptively reused as an office and multi-residences.[5]

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