South Korea women's national ice hockey team

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Shirt badge/Association crest
Association Korea Ice Hockey Association
Head coach Sarah Murray
Assistants Kim Do-yun
Caroline Park
Rebecca Bakker
Captain Lee Kyou sun
Most games Lee Sun-kyou (38)
Most points Hwang Bo-young (40)
IIHF code KOR
IIHF ranking 23 Increase1
Highest IIHF ranking 23 (2015)
Lowest IIHF ranking 28 (first in 2010)
First international
 Kazakhstan 17–1 South Korea 
(Kangwon, South Korea; January 30, 1999)
Biggest win
 South Korea 13–0 Croatia 
(Dumfries, Great Britain; April 5, 2015)
Biggest defeat

 China 30–1 South Korea 
(Aomori, Japan; January 31, 2003)

 Japan 29–0 South Korea 
(Changchun, China; January 29, 2007)
IIHF World Women's Championships
Appearances 7 (first in 2004)
Best result 26th (2007)
Asian Winter Games
Appearances 4 (first in 1999)
Best result 4th (1999)
IIHF Women's Challenge Cup of Asia
Appearances 2 (first in 2011)
Best result 3rd (2011)
International record (W–L–T)
22–43–0

The South Korean women's national ice hockey team represents South Korea at the International Ice Hockey Federation's World Women's Ice Hockey Championship Division IIA. The women's national team is controlled by Korea Ice Hockey Association. As of 2013, South Korea has 184 female players.[1] The South Korean women's national team is ranked 24th in the world.

Tournament record[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

  • 2018 – Host country

World Championships[edit]

In 2004 the South Korean women's hockey team was the first time involved in the World Championship competition.

  • 2004 – Finished in 27th place (6th in Division III, Demoted to Division IV)
  • 2005 – Finished in 27th place (1st in Division IV, Promoted to Division III)
  • 2007 – Finished in 26th place (5th in Division III)
  • 2008 – Finished in 28th place (6th in Division III, Demoted to Division IV)
  • 2009 – Division IV canceled[2]
  • 2011 – Finished in 27th place (2nd in Division IV)
  • 2012 – Finished in 28th place (3rd in Division IIB)
  • 2013 – Finished in 27th place (1st in Division IIB, Promoted to Division IIA)
  • 2014 – Finished in 23rd place (3rd in Division IIA)
  • 2015 – Finished in 23rd place (3rd in Division IIA)

Asian Games[edit]

  • 1999 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2007 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2011 – Finished in 5th place

IIHF Challenge Cup of Asia[edit]

All-time Record against other nations[edit]

As of September 14, 2011

Team GP W T L GF GA
 South Africa 2 2 0 0 14 1
 Iceland 2 2 0 0 12 3
 Romania 3 2 0 1 9 7
 Croatia 1 1 0 0 3 2
 New Zealand 2 1 0 1 6 5
 Australia 1 0 0 1 0 6
 Austria 1 0 0 1 1 10
 Great Britain 2 0 0 2 0 16
 Slovenia 2 0 0 2 1 18
 Belgium 3 0 0 3 6 10
 Hungary 3 0 0 3 4 12
 North Korea 4 0 0 4 1 27
 Kazakhstan 5 0 0 5 1 74
 China 6 0 0 6 3 90
 Japan 6 0 0 6 0 109

Team[edit]

2011 roster[edit]

[4]

Goaltenders
Number Player
1 Han Do-hee
25 Shin So-jung
Defensemen
Number Player
5 Yong Hwa-yeon
7 Lee Kyou-sun
12 Ko Chea-ryung
17 Choi Bo-young
24 Cho Mi-hwan
Forwards
Number Player
3 Han Soo-jin
4 Park Da-yun
11 Han Jae-yeon
13 Hong Young-joo
14 Ahn Kun-young
16 Cho Kyoo-young
19 Lee Min-ji
21 Lee Yeon-jeong
22 Kim Eun-jin
23 Lee Young-hwa

Coaching staff[edit]

[5]

  • Head Coach: Sarah Murray
  • Assistant Coach: Kim Do-yun
  • Assistant Coach: Caroline Park
  • Assistant Coach: Rebecca Bakker
  • Physiotherapist: Hong Young-joo
  • Physiotherapist: Lee Jung-woo

References[edit]

External links[edit]