South Okanagan—West Kootenay

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South Okanagan—West Kootenay
British Columbia electoral district
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Richard Cannings
New Democratic
District created2013
First contested2015
Last contested2019
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1]112,096
Electors (2011)88,519
Area (km²)[1]18,139
Pop. density (per km²)6.2
Census divisionsCentral Kootenay, Kootenay Boundary, Okanagan-Similkameen
Census subdivisionsCastlegar, Central Kootenay H, Grand Forks, Okanagan-Similkameen C, Okanagan-Similkameen D, Oliver, Osoyoos, Penticton, Rossland, Trail

South Okanagan—West Kootenay (French: Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest) is a federal electoral district in British Columbia. It encompasses a portion of British Columbia previously included in the electoral districts of British Columbia Southern Interior (58%), Kootenay—Columbia (3%), and Okanagan—Coquihalla (39%).[2]

South Okanagan—West Kootenay was created by the 2012 federal electoral boundaries redistribution and was legally defined in the 2013 representation order. It came into effect upon the call of the 42nd Canadian federal election, scheduled for October 2015.[3]

Demographics[edit]

Ethnic groups in South Okanagan—West Kootenay (2016)
Source: [1]
Population %
Ethnic group European 93,725 84%
Aboriginal 9,065 8.1%
South Asian 2,850 2.6%
Filipino 695 0.6%
Chinese 685 0.6%
Japanese 505 0.5%
Black 470 0.4%
Southeast Asian 320 0.3%
Latin American 310 0.3%
Korean 195 0.2%
West Asian 45 0%
Arab 35 0%
Multiple minorities 170 0.2%
Visible minority, n.i.e. 100 0.1%
Total population 114,695 100%

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following members of the House of Commons of Canada:

Parliament Years Member Party
South Okanagan—West Kootenay
Riding created from British Columbia Southern Interior,
Kootenay—Columbia and Okanagan—Coquihalla
42nd  2015–2019     Richard Cannings New Democratic
43rd  2019–present

Election results[edit]

2019 Canadian federal election
** Preliminary results — Not yet official **
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
New Democratic Richard Cannings 24,809 36.4
Conservative Helena Konanz 24,053 35.2
Liberal Connie Denesiuk 11,705 17.2
Green Tara-Lyn Howse 5,672 8.3
People's Sean Taylor 1,638 2.4
Independent Carolina Marie Hopkins 359 0.2
Total valid votes/Expense limit 68,196 100.0
Total rejected ballots 381
Turnout 68,577 69.56
Eligible voters 98,589
Source: Elections Canada[4][5]
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
New Democratic Richard Cannings 24,823 37.28 -2.16 $120,417.22
Conservative Marshall Neufeld 19,871 29.84 -14.93 $156,966.44
Liberal Connie Denesiuk 18,732 28.13 +21.03 $26,034.25
Green Samantha Troy 2,792 4.19 -3.94 $153.48
Independent Brian Gray 376 0.56 $115.36
Total valid votes/Expense limit 66,594 100.00   $247,730.42
Total rejected ballots 216 0.32
Turnout 66,810 73.67
Eligible voters 90,694
New Democratic notional gain from Conservative Swing +6.39
Source: Elections Canada[6][7]
2011 federal election redistributed results[8]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 24,846 44.77
  New Democratic 21,886 39.44
  Green 4,512 8.13
  Liberal 3,942 7.10
  Others 308 0.56

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Statistics Canada: 2012
  2. ^ Final Report – British Columbia
  3. ^ Timeline for the Redistribution of Federal Electoral Districts
  4. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  5. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 16, 2019.
  6. ^ Elections Canada – Confirmed candidates for South Okanagan—West Kootenay, 30 September 2015
  7. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates
  8. ^ Pundits' Guide to Canadian Elections