South Sudan National Olympic Committee

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
South Sudan National Olympic Committee
Country/Region South Sudan
CodeSSD
Created8 June 2015
Recognized2 August 2015
Continental
Association
ANOCA
PresidentWilson Deng Kuoirot
Secretary GeneralTong Chor Malek Deran

The South Sudan National Olympic Committee is the National Olympic Committee representing South Sudan. It was founded in Juba on 8 June 2015,[1] and became a full member of the International Olympic Committee and the Olympic Movement on 2 August 2015.[2] The theme of the June meeting was "Let's build peace and unity through sport", reflecting the ongoing South Sudanese Civil War.[1] The founding president is Lt-Gen. Wilson Deng Kuoirot.[1]

Affiliated sports[edit]

Sports governing bodies affiliated to the South Sudan National Olympic Committee[3][1]
Sport Body Federation Refs
Athletics South Sudan Athletics Federation IAAF [4]
Basketball South Sudan Basketball Federation FIBA [5]
Association Football South Sudan Football Association FIFA [6]
Handball South Sudan Handball Federation IHF [7]
Judo IJF
Table Tennis South Sudan Table Tennis Federation ITTF [8][9]
Taekwondo South Sudan Taekwondo Federation WTF [10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "South Sudan holds Olympic Committee founding meeting". Radio Tamazuj. 10 June 2015. Archived from the original on 3 January 2016. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  2. ^ South Sudan NOC granted full recognition at 128th IOC Session
  3. ^ Agence France-Presse (2 August 2015). "South Sudan to compete in Rio after becoming 206th Olympic nation". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 September 2015. Now it is recognised by the athletics, basketball, football, handball, judo, table tennis and tae kwon do federations.
  4. ^ "Member Federations". IAAF. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  5. ^ "South Sudan (SSD)". FIBA. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  6. ^ "South Sudan". FIFA. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  7. ^ "South Sudan Handball Federation - Associated members". IHF. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  8. ^ ": ITTF Women's World Cup Heads to Europe for the First Time". Press Release. ITTF. Archived from the original on 3 May 2015. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  9. ^ "Ass. per Continent". ITTF. Archived from the original on 7 April 2015. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  10. ^ "South Sudan". WTF. Archived from the original on 20 March 2015. Retrieved 1 September 2015.

External links[edit]