Southeastern Conference Women's Basketball Player of the Year

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SEC Women's Basketball Player of the Year
Southeastern Conference logo.svg
Awarded forthe most outstanding women's basketball player in the Southeastern Conference
CountryUnited States
First awarded1987
Currently held byTeaira McCowan, Mississippi State

The Southeastern Conference (SEC) Women's Basketball Player of the Year is an award given to the most outstanding player in the Southeastern Conference.

Although the SEC began its women's postseason tournament in 1980, and began official regular-season conference play in the 1982–83 season,[1] a Player of the Year award was not created until the 1986–87 season.

Currently, two bodies vote for Players of the Year. The league's coaches have selected a Player of the Year since the 1986–87 season, and the Associated Press began presenting its version of the award in the 1996–97 season.[2] The two voting bodies have split their honors three times, most recently in 2012–13 when the AP honored A'dia Mathies of Kentucky and the coaches honored Meighan Simmons of Tennessee.

The school with the most SEC Player of the Year award winners is Tennessee, with 9 total awards. Four SEC members have yet to have a winner—charter SEC members Alabama and Ole Miss, and 2012 arrivals Missouri and Texas A&M.

While nine players have won at least a share of the award twice, only one, A'ja Wilson of South Carolina, has won three times.

Key[edit]

Co-Players of the Year
* Awarded a national Player of the Year award:
the Naismith College Player of the Year, the John R. Wooden Award, or the Wade Trophy
A Associated Press selection
C SEC coaches selection
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player received the Player of the Year award at that point

Winners[edit]

Season Player[a] School Position Class Reference(s)
1986–87 Katrina McClain Georgia
1987–88 Vickie Orr Auburn C[3] Senior[3]
1988–89 Bridgette Gordon Tennessee F[4] Senior[4]
1989–90 Carolyn Jones Auburn G[5] Junior[5]
1990–91 Carolyn Jones (2) Auburn G[5] Senior[5]
1991–92 Dena Head Tennessee F[4] Senior[4]
1992–93 Lauretta Freeman Auburn F[6] Senior[6]
1993–94 Nikki McCray Tennessee F[4] Junior[4]
1994–95 Nikki McCray (2) Tennessee F[4] Senior[4]
1995–96 Saudia Roundtree* Georgia
1996–97 DeLisha Milton* Florida
1997–98 Chamique Holdsclaw* Tennessee F[4] Junior[4]
1998–99 Chamique Holdsclaw* (2) Tennessee F[4] Senior[4]
1999–00 Kelly Miller Georgia
2000–01 Kelly Miller (2) Georgia
2001–02 Chantelle AndersonC Vanderbilt
2001–02 LaToya ThomasA Mississippi State
2002–03 LaToya Thomas (2) Mississippi State
2003–04 Shameka Christon Arkansas
2004–05 Seimone Augustus* LSU F[7] Junior[7]
2005–06 Seimone Augustus* (2) LSU F[7] Senior[7]
2006–07 Candace Parker* Tennessee F[4] Sophomore[8]
2007–08 Sylvia Fowles LSU C[7] Senior[7]
2008–09 DeWanna Bonner Auburn G[9] Senior[9]
2009–10 Victoria Dunlap Kentucky F[10] Junior[11]
2010–11 Victoria DunlapA (2) Kentucky F[10] Senior[11]
2010–11 Shekinna StricklenC Tennessee G/F[4] Junior[4]
2011–12 A'dia Mathies Kentucky G[12] Junior[11]
2012–13 A'dia MathiesA (2) Kentucky G[12] Senior[11] [13][14]
2012–13 Meighan SimmonsC Tennessee G[4] Junior[4] [13]
2013–14 Tiffany Mitchell South Carolina G Sophomore [15]
2014–15 Tiffany Mitchell (2) South Carolina G Junior [16][17]
2015–16 A'ja Wilson South Carolina F Sophomore [18]
2016–17 A'ja Wilson (2) South Carolina F Junior [19]
2017–18 A'ja Wilson* (3) South Carolina F Senior [20][21]
2018–19 Teaira McCowan Mississippi State C Senior [22][23]

Winners by school[edit]

School (year joined) Winners Years
Tennessee (1932) 9 1989, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2007, 2011, 2013
South Carolina (1991) 5 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Auburn (1932) 5 1988, 1990, 1991, 1993, 2009
Georgia (1932) 4 1987, 1996, 2000, 2001
Kentucky (1932) 4 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013
LSU (1932) 3 2005, 2006, 2008
Mississippi State (1932) 3 2002, 2003, 2019
Arkansas (1991) 1 2004
Florida (1932) 1 1997
Vanderbilt (1932) 1 2002
Alabama (1932) 0
Ole Miss (1932) 0
Missouri (2012) 0
Texas A&M (2012) 0

Footnotes[edit]

  • a If no special demarcation indicates which award the player won that season, then she had earned all of the awards available for that year.

References[edit]

General
  • List of winners through 2011–12 season:[2]
  • Winners of major national awards: "Honors: National Players of the Year" (PDF). 2012–13 SEC Women's Basketball Media Guide. Southeastern Conference. p. 111. Retrieved May 16, 2013.
Specific
  1. ^ "Championships: SEC Champions" (PDF). 2012–13 SEC Women's Basketball Media Guide. Southeastern Conference. p. 88. Retrieved May 16, 2013. Women’s basketball first came under the auspices of the Southeastern Conference in the 1982-83 season. Games played between SEC teams before that time are not counted in the alltime standings, since there was no uniform number of conference games. The league began sponsoring a tournament in 1980.
  2. ^ a b "Honors: SEC Yearly Player Awards" (PDF). 2012–13 SEC Women's Basketball Media Guide. Southeastern Conference. p. 110. Retrieved May 16, 2013.
  3. ^ a b "All-Time Roster/Statistics" (PDF). 2012–13 Auburn Women's Basketball Almanac. Auburn University Athletics. p. 81. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "History: All-Time Roster" (PDF). Tennessee Lady Volunteers Basketball 2012–13 Record Book. University of Tennessee Athletics. pp. 74–76. Retrieved May 17, 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d "All-Time Roster/Statistics" (PDF). 2012–13 Auburn Women's Basketball Almanac. Auburn University Athletics. p. 76. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  6. ^ a b "All-Time Roster/Statistics" (PDF). 2012–13 Auburn Women's Basketball Almanac. Auburn University Athletics. p. 71. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f "All-Time Starting Lineups". 2012–13 LSU Women's Basketball Media Guide. LSU Athletics. p. 181. Retrieved May 17, 2013.
  8. ^ Although Parker arrived at Tennessee in 2004, and is listed as having been a team member from 2005–2008 (the Tennessee basketball media guide consistently classifies seasons by the calendar years in which they end), she took a medical redshirt year in 2004–05 due to injury. She was named SEC Freshman of the Year in the 2005–06 season, the year before she was named Player of the Year. "History: Lady Vol Honorees (SEC Freshman of the Year)" (PDF). Tennessee Lady Volunteers Basketball 2012–13 Record Book. University of Tennessee Athletics. p. 81. Retrieved May 17, 2013.
  9. ^ a b "All-Time Roster/Statistics" (PDF). 2012–13 Auburn Women's Basketball Almanac. Auburn University Athletics. p. 68. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  10. ^ a b "Women's Basketball: 2010–11 Roster". University of Kentucky Athletics Department. Retrieved May 31, 2013. In official publications, Kentucky women's basketball does not distinguish between power forward and small forward.
  11. ^ a b c d "All-Time Letterwinners" (PDF). 40 Minutes: Kentucky Women's Basketball 2012–2013. University of Kentucky Athletics Department. p. 101. Retrieved May 16, 2013.
  12. ^ a b "2012–13 Rosters". 40 Minutes: Kentucky Women's Basketball 2012–2013. University of Kentucky Athletics Department. Retrieved May 31, 2013. In official publications, Kentucky women's basketball lists "guard" and "point guard" as separate positions.
  13. ^ a b "Mathies, Stallworth, Walker Honored by SEC" (Press release). University of Kentucky Athletics Department. March 5, 2013. Archived from the original on March 9, 2013. Retrieved May 16, 2013.
  14. ^ "Mathies Earns Second Straight AP SEC Player of the Year" (Press release). University of Kentucky Athletics Department. March 19, 2013. Retrieved May 16, 2013.
  15. ^ [1]
  16. ^ 2015 SEC Women’s Basketball Awards Announced
  17. ^ "South Carolina's Mitchell AP's SEC women's player of year". ESPN.com. Associated Press. March 17, 2015. Retrieved March 17, 2015. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  18. ^ "2016 SEC Women's Basketball Awards announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. March 2, 2016. Retrieved March 2, 2016.
  19. ^ "2017 SEC Women's Basketball Awards announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. March 1, 2017. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
  20. ^ "2018 SEC Women's Basketball Awards announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. February 27, 2018. Retrieved February 28, 2018.
  21. ^ "South Carolina's A'ja Wilson named SEC player of year again". ESPN.com. Associated Press. February 27, 2018. Retrieved February 27, 2018.
  22. ^ "2019 SEC women's basketball awards announced" (Press release). Southeastern Conference. March 5, 2019. Retrieved March 5, 2019.
  23. ^ Horka, Tyler (March 5, 2019). "Mississippi State Bulldogs headline All-SEC women's basketball awards". Mississippi Clarion Ledger. Retrieved March 5, 2019.