Neonopolis

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The exterior of Neonopolis next to Fremont Street.

Neonopolis, a 250,000 sq ft (23,000 m2) shopping mall,[1] is a $100 million entertainment complex in Las Vegas, Nevada located on top of a $15 million city parking garage. It is located on Fremont Street, at the corner of Las Vegas Boulevard. In keeping with the complex's name, it contains three miles of neon lights.[2]

Three open-air levels surround an outdoor center courtyard with stage, sound and seating. Bands and concerts were scheduled during the summer months during its heyday.

History[edit]

Plans for Neonopolis were announced in December 1997.[3] It opened on May 3, 2002.[4]

In 2006, Prudential Real Estate sold Neonopolis to a development group led by Rohit Joshi for $25 million.[5] Joshi undertook an abortive rebranding of the center as Fremont Square, but ultimately the Neonopolis name was retained.[6][7][8] After temporarily closing in 2010 for redevelopment, Neonopolis underwent renovations in 2011 and reopened with new tenants.

Current tenants[edit]

The interior courtyard of the shopping center.
  • Axehole ― An axe throwing range, opened in 2017.[9]
  • Banger Brewing ― A 3,000-square-foot (280 m2) pub and microbrewery, opened in 2013 on the ground floor.[10][11]
  • Cannabition ― A marijuana-themed museum, opened in 2018.[12] Among the exhibits is Bongzilla, billed as the world's largest bong.[13]
  • Cat's Meow ― A 10,000-square-foot (930 m2) karaoke club located on the second floor, opened in 2019. It is the second location of a popular, long-established club in New Orleans.[14]
  • Del Prado Jewelers ― A jewelry store that moved to the second floor of Neonopolis in 2006.[15][16]
  • Denny's ― A 6,400-square-foot (590 m2) flagship location for the diner chain, featuring a wedding chapel. Opened in 2012.[17][18]
  • Don't Tell Mama ― A piano bar located on the mall's ground floor. It moved to Neonopolis in 2019 from its previous location on Fremont East.[19]
  • Evapor8 ― An e-cigarette shop, opened in 2013.[20]
  • Fremont Arcade ― A video arcade, opened in 2016 on the ground floor.[21][22]
  • Heart Attack Grill ― A hamburger restaurant, known for its medical theme and for offering the world's highest-calorie burger, opened in 2011.[23][24]
  • International Eatery ― A food court with three outlets, opened in 2013 in the ground-floor former Luna Rossa Ristorante space, by HIG Management, a major operator of mall eateries.[25][26]
  • Little Neon Wedding Chapel ― A wedding chapel opened in 2016.[27]
  • Metropolitan Gallery of Las Vegas ― An art museum and gallery. Previously named the Southern Nevada Museum of Fine Art, it moved to Neonopolis in 2008.[28][29][30] The name was changed in 2017.[31]
  • Millennial Esports ― A 15,000-square-foot (1,400 m2) venue for competitive video gaming, opened in 2017 on the third floor.[32][33]
  • The Nerd ― A nightclub and bowling alley themed around comic books and video games, opened in 2017 in the second-floor former Drink & Drag space.[34][35]
  • TelemundoKBLR, the Las Vegas affiliate of the Spanish-language television network, moved its studios to a 17,500-square-foot (1,630 m2) space on the third floor in 2009.[36][37]
  • Toy Shack ― A seller of vintage collectible toys. It moved to the shopping center in 2011 to capitalize on visitors familiar with its owner's frequent appearances on the television series Pawn Stars.[38][39]
  • Ultimate Sports Cards & Memorabilia ― A sports memorabilia shop, which moved to Neonopolis in 2012, like the Toy Shack, because of its owner's appearances on Pawn Stars.[40][41]

Previous tenants[edit]

  • Drink and Drag ― A bowling alley and drag club, opened in 2012.[42] Closed in 2013 because of legal and financial issues.[43]
  • Galaxy Theatres ― An 11-screen movie theater. Opened in 2002 as Crown Theatres, the center's original anchor tenant, with 14 screens.[4] Later reduced to 11 screens, and then taken over by Galaxy in 2006.[44] Closed in 2009.[45][46]
  • Jillian's ― A two-story restaurant, bar, and entertainment complex. Opened in 2002 as one of the complex's anchor tenants.[47] Closed in 2008.[48]
  • Krave Massive ― A gay nightclub, sister property of Drink and Drag, moved to the former Galaxy movie theater space from its previous location on the Las Vegas Strip in June 2013.[49] It was planned to be the largest gay club in the world, but never fully opened.[43][50] Closed after several months because of a tax dispute.[43]
  • Las Vegas Rocks Cafe ― A restaurant and lounge themed around the history of Las Vegas. Opened in 2009 in the former Jillian's space.[51][52] Closed in 2011.[53]
  • Poker Dome ― A studio for nationally televised poker events. Opened in 2006 on the third floor, in space previously occupied by three of the movie theaters.[54] Closed in 2007.[55]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Skolnik, Sam (2008-11-11). "Has Neonopolis achieved liftoff?". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 12 November 2008.
  2. ^ "Neonopolis". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 12 November 2008.
  3. ^ Zapler, Mike (December 18, 1997). "Downtown retail complex in works, officials say". Las Vegas Review-Journal – via NewsBank.
  4. ^ a b Sahagun, Diana (May 3, 2002). "Long-awaited Neonopolis opens in downtown Vegas". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  5. ^ "Downtown project still in bad shape". Las Vegas Sun. December 14, 2006. Retrieved 2018-06-15.
  6. ^ Spillman, Benjamin (May 3, 2007). "Old woes but a new moniker". Las Vegas Review-Journal – via NewsBank.
  7. ^ "TV studio, nightclub considered for mall". Las Vegas Review-Journal. September 9, 2008 – via NewsBank.
  8. ^ Jourdan, Kristi (March 22, 2011). "Neonopolis in waiting". Downtown View. Las Vegas – via NewsBank.
  9. ^ Millward, Wade Tyler (September 29, 2017). "Ax-throwing attraction opens at Neonoplis in downtown Las Vegas". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-08-02.
  10. ^ Adams, Mark (January 9, 2014). "Banger Brewing, downtown beer boys". Las Vegas Weekly. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  11. ^ Lister, Nolan (May 20, 2013). "Longtime friends team up to open brewery in Neonopolis". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  12. ^ Coffey, Helen (September 21, 2018). "Cannabition: World's first interactive marijuana museum opens in Las Vegas". The Independent. London. Retrieved 2018-09-22.
  13. ^ Akers, Mick (August 30, 2018). "Cannabis museum in Las Vegas gives sneak peek, will open in September". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-09-22.
  14. ^ Bracelin, Jason (July 18, 2019). "Cat's Meow aims to hit all the right notes in downtown Las Vegas". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2019-07-20.
  15. ^ Katsilometes, John (May 10, 2007). "John Katsilometes checks on an old pal at Neonopolis before saying farewell". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  16. ^ Katsilometes, John (July 3, 2007). "The Neverending Story". Las Vegas Weekly. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  17. ^ Sieroty, Chris (November 30, 2012). "Marriage on Denny's menu". Las Vegas Review-Journal – via NewsBank.
  18. ^ Shine, Conor (August 4, 2012). "One-of-a-kind Denny's to call Neonopolis home". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  19. ^ Katsilometes, John (March 20, 2019). "Earth Wind & Fire fired up for Las Vegas Strip series". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2019-03-21.
  20. ^ Schoenmann, Joe (August 8, 2013). "Joe Downtown: Businesses breathing life into Neonopolis". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  21. ^ Corey, Alexander S. (October 15, 2016). "Entrepreneurs turn arcade nostalgia into growing business in Las Vegas Valley". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  22. ^ Apgar, Blake (July 30, 2016). "Owner sees brighter days ahead for Neonopolis in downtown Las Vegas". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  23. ^ Schoenmann, Joe (February 8, 2013). "Downtown Joe: Death knocking at door of Heart Attack Grill's unofficial spokesman". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  24. ^ Valley, Jackie (February 15, 2012). "Heart Attack Grill put to test as patron suffers heart attack". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  25. ^ Snel, Alan (May 5, 2014). "Food court giant snaps up space next to SlotZilla". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  26. ^ Schoenmann, Joe (January 23, 2014). "Joe Downtown: Food court's success raising hopes for Neonopolis' owner". Vegas Inc. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  27. ^ "Neon Chapel opens at Neonopolis in downtown Las Vegas". Las Vegas Review-Journal. July 5, 2016. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  28. ^ "About Us". Southern Nevada Museum of Fine Art. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  29. ^ Padgett, Sonya (February 26, 2009). "Under one roof". Las Vegas Review-Journal – via NewsBank.
  30. ^ Keene, Jarret (October 27, 2008). "Southern Nevada Museum of Fine Art". Las Vegas CityLife – via NewsBank.
  31. ^ "The Metropolitan Gallery of Las Vegas Art Museum". Las Vegas Woman. August 23, 2017. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  32. ^ Wanser, Brooke (March 3, 2017). "Esports arena debuts on Fremont Street Experience in Las Vegas". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  33. ^ Akers, Mick (February 22, 2017). "E-sports enthusiasts get boost with Neonopolis arena". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  34. ^ Taylor, F. Andrew (April 11, 2017). "Downtown Las Vegas nightclub, The Nerd, aims for 'anti-club atmosphere'". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  35. ^ Prevatt, Mike (April 6, 2017). "Downtown's Nerd nightclub beckons geeks (and everyone else)". Las Vegas Weekly. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  36. ^ Hansel, Mark (February 6, 2009). "Star Trek and Telemundo make for strange bedfellows". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  37. ^ DeFrank, Sean (October 6, 2011). "Nowhere Man". Vegas Seven. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  38. ^ Ahmed, Aida (September 26, 2011). "Downtown Las Vegas toy store shoots for the stars". Vegas Inc. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  39. ^ Haugen, Joanna (July 15, 2012). "At Toy Shack in Neonopolis, every day's a playdate". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  40. ^ McGarry, Caitlin (August 22, 2012). "Businesses scramble for share of 'Pawn Stars' fame". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  41. ^ "Action News at 6PM". KTNV-TV. December 4, 2012 – via NewsBank.
  42. ^ McGarry, Caitlin (May 4, 2012). "Drink and Drag offers bowling, drag queens on Fremont Street". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  43. ^ a b c Spillman, Benjamin (October 2, 2013). "Troubled Las Vegas nightclubs denied licenses". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  44. ^ Knightly, Arnold M. (October 23, 2006). "Neonopolis looks to Galaxy Theaters for new energy". Las Vegas Business Press – via NewsBank.
  45. ^ Cling, Carol (May 6, 2009). "Neonopolis theaters to go dark Thursday night". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  46. ^ Kingsley, Amy (June 30, 2011). "A grand slam". Las Vegas CityLife – via NewsBank.
  47. ^ Johnson, Erica D. (October 15, 2002). "Observers hopeful about new downtown attraction". Las Vegas Sun – via NewsBank.
  48. ^ Skolnik, Sam (December 9, 2008). "Two versions of Jillian's demise, from man, wife". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-06-14.
  49. ^ Spillman, Benjamin (August 31, 2013). "State closes troubled Krave Massive". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  50. ^ Prevatt, Mike (October 18, 2013). "Krave to reopen at former Utopia site on Strip". Las Vegas Weekly. Retrieved 2018-06-13.
  51. ^ Llewellyn, Amanda (December 29, 2009). "Las Vegas Rocks". Downtown View – via NewsBank.
  52. ^ Weatherford, Mike (January 28, 2010). "Venues take on new look". Las Vegas Review-Journal – via NewsBank.
  53. ^ Katsilometes, John (February 15, 2011). "Las Vegas Rocks Cafe closes at Neonopolis, and we're surprised ... why, exactly?". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2018-08-20.
  54. ^ Hoffarth, Tom (July 30, 2006). "At this Vegas dome, it's 'poker on steroids'". Daily News of Los Angeles – via NewsBank.
  55. ^ Spillman, Benjamin (June 16, 2007). "Neonopolis takes another hit as Poker Dome opts to fold". Las Vegas Review-Journal – via NewsBank.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°10′12″N 115°8′26″W / 36.17000°N 115.14056°W / 36.17000; -115.14056