Souvenir Henri Desgrange

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The monument to Henri Desgrange close to the summit of the Col du Galibier

The Souvenir Henri Desgrange is an award and cash prize, since 1947, in the Tour de France cycle race. It is named in honour of the creator and first race director of the Tour de France, French sports journalist Henri Desgrange. The cyclist to reach the top of either the Col du Galibier, where Desgrange's monument stands, or (in case the Col du Galibier is not in the route) the highest climb of the Tour, receives the €5000 prize.

List of climbs and winners[edit]

List of climbs and winners[1]
Year Stage Climb Altitude First to summit Prize Ref
1947 11 Ovalon unknown  Édouard Fachleitner (FRA)
1948 1 Picardie unknown  Roger Lambrecht (BEL) Ffr. 30.000
1949 15 unknown unknown  Paul Giguet (FRA) Ffr. 120.000
1950 19 Col du Lautaret 2,057 m (6,749 ft)  Apo Lazaridès (FRA) Ffr. 75.000
1951 21 Col du Lautaret 2,057 m (6,749 ft)  Gino Sciardis (FRA)
1952 11 Col du Lautaret 2,057 m (6,749 ft)  Fausto Coppi (ITA)
1953 16 Villa unknown  Claude Colette (FRA) Ffr. 1000
1954 19 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Federico Bahamontes (ESP) Ffr. 100.000
1955 10 Saint Tropaix unknown  André Darrigade (FRA) Ffr. 1000
1956 2 Cysoing unknown  Pierre Pardoën (FRA) Ffr. 100.000
1957 10 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Marcel Janssens (BEL)
1958 21 Col du Lautaret 2,057 m (6,749 ft)  Piet van Est (NED) Ffr. 100.000
1959 18 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Charly Gaul (LUX) Ffr. 100.000
1960 17 Col du Lautaret 2,057 m (6,749 ft)  Jean Graczyk (FRA) Ffr. 200.000
1961 6 Ballon d'Alsace 1,247 m (4,091 ft)  Joseph Planckaert (BEL) Ffr. 2000
1962 19 Col du Lautaret 2,057 m (6,749 ft)  Juan Campillo (ESP) [2]
1963 not awarded
1964 10a Beauvallon unknown  André Darrigade (FRA) Ffr. 2000
1965 17 Col du Lautaret 2,057 m (6,749 ft)  Francisco Gabica (ESP) Ffr. 2000
1966 16 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Julio Jiménez (ESP) Ffr. 2000
1967 10 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Julio Jiménez (ESP)
1968 19 Col des Aravis 1,487 m (4,879 ft)  Barry Hoban (GBR) Ffr. 2000
1969 10 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
1970 19 Col d'Aubisque 1,709 m (5,607 ft)  Raymond Delisle (FRA) Ffr. 2,000
1971 19 Côte de Dourdan unknown  Wilmo Francioni (ITA) Ffr. 2,000 [3]
1972 14a Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Joop Zoetemelk (NED) Ffr. 2,000
1973 8 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Luis Ocaña (ESP) Ffr. 2,000
1974 11 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Vicente López Carril (ESP) Ffr. 2,000
1975 17 Col du Télégraphe 1,566 m (5,138 ft)  Luis Balague (ESP) Ffr. 2,000
1976 11 Col du Lautaret 2,057 m (6,749 ft)  Luciano Conati (ITA) Ffr. 2,000
1977 2 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft)  Lucien Van Impe (BEL)
1978 11 Sainte Marie de Campan unknown  Christian Seznec (FRA) Ffr. 2,000
1979 17 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Lucien van Impe (BEL)
1980 17 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Johan de Muynck (BEL)
1981 7 185 km (115 mi) unknown  Theo de Rooij (NED) Ffr. 5000 [4]
1982 12 Col du Soulor 1,474 m (4,836 ft)  André Chalmel (FRA)
1983 10 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft)  José Patrocinio Jiménez (COL)
1984 18 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Francisco Rodriguez (COL)
1985 17 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft)  Pello Ruiz (ESP)
1986 18 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Luis Herrera (COL)
1987 21 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Pedro Muñoz (ESP)
1988 15 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft)  Laudelino Cubino (ESP)
1989 17 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Gert-Jan Theunisse (NED) [5]
1990 16 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft)  Miguel Ángel Martínez (ESP)
1991 13 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft)  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA)
1992 14 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Franco Chioccioli (ITA)
1993 10 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Tony Rominger (SUI)
1994 12 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft)  Richard Virenque (FRA)
1995 15 Col de la Croix de Fer 2,067 m (6,781 ft)  Richard Virenque (FRA)
1996 17 Col d'Aubisque 1,709 m (5,607 ft)  Neil Stephens (AUS)
1997 10 Port d'Envalira 2,408 m (7,900 ft)  Richard Virenque (FRA)
1998 15 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Marco Pantani (ITA) [6]
1999 9 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  José Luis Arrieta (ESP) Ffr. 20,000 [7]
2000 15 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Pascal Hervé (FRA) Ffr. 20,000 [8]
2001 10 Col de la Madeleine 1,993 m (6,539 ft)  Laurent Roux (FRA) Ffr. 20,000 [9]
2002 16 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Santiago Botero (COL) €3,000 [10]
2003 8 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Stefano Garzelli (ITA) €5,000 [11]
2004 17 Col de la Madeleine 1,993 m (6,539 ft)  Gilberto Simoni (ITA) €5,000 [12]
2005 11 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Alexandre Vinokourov (KAZ) €5,000 [13]
2006 16 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Michael Rasmussen (DEN) €5,000 [14]
2007 9 Col du Galibier 2,645 m (8,678 ft)  Mauricio Soler (COL) €5,000 [15]
2008 16 Col de la Bonette 2,802 m (9,193 ft)  John-Lee Augustyn (RSA) €5,000 [16]
2009 16 Col du Grand-Saint-Bernard 2,473 m (8,114 ft)  Franco Pellizotti (ITA) €5,000 [17]
2010 17 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft)  Andy Schleck (LUX) €5,000 [18]
2011 18 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft)  Andy Schleck (LUX) €5,000 [19]
2012 11 Col de la Croix de Fer 2,067 m (6,781 ft)  Fredrik Kessiakoff (SWE) €5,000 [20]
2013 8 Port de Pailhères 2,001 m (6,565 ft)  Nairo Quintana (COL) €5,000 [21]
2014 14 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft)  Joaquim Rodríguez (ESP) €5,000 [22]
2015 20 Col d'Allos 2,250 m (7,382 ft)  Simon Geschke (GER) €5,000 [23]
2016 10 Port d'Envalira 2,408 m (7,900 ft)  Rui Costa (POR) €5,000 [24]
2017 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft)  Primož Roglič (SLO) €5,000 [25]
2018 17 Col de Portet 2,215 m (7,267 ft)  Nairo Quintana (COL) €5,000 [26]
2019 19 Col de l'Iseran 2,764 m (9,068 ft)  Egan Bernal (COL) €5,000 [27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ van den Akker, Pieter. "Souvenir Henri Desgrange". TourDeFranceStatistieken.nl. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  2. ^ "Kleine misrekening" [Small miscalculation]. Friese Koerier (in Dutch). 13 July 1962. p. 13 – via Delpher.
  3. ^ "Feiten en cijfers van de Tour" [Facts and figures of the Tour]. NRC Handelsblad (in Dutch). 19 July 1971. p. 11 – via Delpher.
  4. ^ "Theo de Rooy in de prijzen" [Theo de Rooy wins prizes]. De Telegraaf (in Dutch). 3 July 1981. p. 15 – via Delpher.
  5. ^ "Etappe-kroniek" [Stage chronicle]. Provinciale Zeeuwse Courant (in Dutch). Algemeen Nederlands Persbureau. 20 July 1989. p. 15. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 1 March 2019.
  6. ^ "Stage 15 brief". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 27 July 1998. Archived from the original on 9 September 2011. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  7. ^ "Stage 9, Le Grand Bornand - Sestrières (Italy), 215 kms". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 13 July 1999. Archived from the original on 25 June 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  8. ^ Maloney, Tim (16 July 2000). "Pantani powers to second stage win". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 10 May 2016. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  9. ^ Maloney, Tim (17 July 2001). "Tex bluffs to win Coup de Poker at L'Alpe d'Huez". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  10. ^ Maloney, Tim (24 July 2002). "Boogerd Boogie-Woogies to win in La Plagne". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  11. ^ Hood, Andrew (13 July 2003). "Mayo wins, Armstrong in yellow after epic day at Tour". VeloNews. Pocket Outdoor Media. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  12. ^ Maloney, Tim; Jones, Jeff (22 July 2004). ""No Gifts": Armstrong sprints to third consecutive stage win". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  13. ^ "Vino's back! and Botero better". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 14 July 2005. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  14. ^ "Tables turn on La Toussuire as Landis loses yellow to Pereiro". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 20 July 2006. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  15. ^ "Soler shines in Briançon". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 17 July 2007. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  16. ^ "Key moments". Tour de France. Amaury Sport Organization. 22 July 2008. Archived from the original on 24 July 2018. Retrieved 26 July 2019.
  17. ^ Tan, Anthony (21 July 2009). "Astarloza top dog in Bourg-Saint-Maurice". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 16 February 2018. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  18. ^ Clarke, Les (22 July 2010). "Schleck takes stage win atop Col du Tourmalet". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  19. ^ Edward, Pickering (14 July 2011). "Stage 18 analysis: Andy Schleck lands a heavy blow". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Archived from the original on 18 October 2016. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  20. ^ "Rolland wins while Wiggins increases his lead – News stage 11 – Tour de France 2012". Tour de France. Amaury Sport Organisation. 12 July 2012. Archived from the original on 26 September 2015. Retrieved 19 August 2015.
  21. ^ Bull, Nick (6 July 2013). "Chris Froome wins Tour de France mountain stage to take overall lead". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Archived from the original on 21 August 2015. Retrieved 16 August 2015.
  22. ^ "Majka claims first Tour win in Risoul – News stage 14 – Tour de France 2014". Tour de France. Amaury Sport Organisation. 13 July 2014. Archived from the original on 12 October 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  23. ^ Bull, Nick (22 July 2015). "How Simon Geschke saved Giant-Alpecin's 2015 Tour de France". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Archived from the original on 23 July 2015. Retrieved 22 July 2015.
  24. ^ "Michael Matthews denies Sagan to win stage 10, Chris Froome retains yellow". Eurosport. Discovery Communications. 12 July 2016. Archived from the original on 17 July 2016. Retrieved 15 July 2016.
  25. ^ Benson, Daniel (18 July 2017). "Tour de France: Matthews wins stage 16". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 16 August 2017. Retrieved 18 July 2017.
  26. ^ Lowe, Felix (25 July 2018). "Tour de France 2018: Quintana wins on Col du Portet as Froome cracks and Thomas strengthens GC grip". Eurosport. Discovery Communications. Archived from the original on 31 July 2018. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  27. ^ "Tour de France: Bernal takes yellow on shortened stage 19". Cyclingnews.com. 26 July 2019. Retrieved 26 July 2019.

External links[edit]

Media related to Monument Henri Desgrange at Wikimedia Commons