Souvenir Jacques Goddet

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The Souvenir Jacques Goddet is an award and cash prize, since 2001, in the Tour de France cycle race. The Souvenir is named in honour of historically second Tour de France director and French sports journalist Jacques Goddet. The Souvenir Jacques Goddet is awarded to the first rider to reach the summit of a particular climb on the Tour, usually the Col du Tourmalet. For years 2015, 2016 and 2018 the cash prize was €5.000[1]. In 2019, Thibaut Pinot became the first repeat winner of the Souvenir Jacques Goddet.

List of winners[edit]

List of winners
Year Stage Rider Team Climb Altitude Prize Ref
2001 14  Sven Montgomery  (SUI) Française des Jeux Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Ffr. 20,000 [2]
2002 11  Laurent Jalabert  (FRA) CSC–Tiscali Col d'Aubisque 1,709 m (5,607 ft) [3]
2003 15  Sylvain Chavanel (FRA) Brioches La Boulangère Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [4][5]
2004 not awarded
2005
2006 11  David de la Fuente (ESP) Saunier Duval–Prodir Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [6][7]
2007 not awarded
2008 10  Rémy Di Gregorio (FRA) Française des Jeux Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [8][9]
2009 9  Franco Pellizotti (ITA)[a] Liquigas Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [11][12]
2010 16  Christophe Moreau (FRA) Caisse d'Epargne Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [13][14]
2011 12  Jérémy Roy (FRA) FDJ Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [15][16]
2012 16  Thomas Voeckler (FRA) Team Europcar Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [17][18]
2013 not awarded [19]
2014 18  Blel Kadri (FRA) Ag2r–La Mondiale Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [20][21]
2015 11  Rafał Majka (POL) Tinkoff–Saxo Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [22][23]
2016 8  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) FDJ Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [24][25]
2017 not awarded [26]
2018 19  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Quick-Step Floors Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000 [27][28]
2019 14  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) €5,000

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In March 2011, Franco Pellizotti's results were removed after the Court of Arbitration for Sport found his biological passport indicated irregular values.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tour de France 2018: prize money". Road Cycling UK. 2018-07-06. Archived from the original on 2018-07-25. Retrieved 2018-07-25.
  2. ^ Maloney, Tim (22 July 2001). "Basque battler Laiseka blasts to win at Luz Ardiden". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2016-04-25. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  3. ^ Maloney, Tim (18 July 2002). "Armstrong powers to stage win and Maillot Jaune". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2011-07-16. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  4. ^ Le règlement et les prix [The regulations and prizes] (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. p. 35. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 September 2003. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  5. ^ Maloney, Tim (21 July 2003). "Armstrong wins stage & makes miracle comeback". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2018-10-05. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  6. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2006. p. 25. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 July 2006. Retrieved 27 October 2016.
  7. ^ Tan, Anthony; Kroner, Hedwig (13 July 2006). "An orange fiesta of the third kind". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2018-08-07. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  8. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2008. p. 79. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 March 2009. Retrieved 27 October 2016.
  9. ^ "Evans in yellow as Piepoli wins atop Hautacam". VeloNews. Pocket Outdoor Media. 14 July 2008. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  10. ^ "Italian cyclist Franco Pellizotti found guilty of doping by Court of Arbitration for Sport". ESPN.com. 9 March 2011. Archived from the original on 23 June 2014. Retrieved 10 July 2012.
  11. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2009. p. 28. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 July 2009. Retrieved 27 October 2016.
  12. ^ Tan, Anthony; Clarke, Les (12 July 2009). "Fedrigo claims another stage for France". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2018-02-16. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  13. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2010. p. 23. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 July 2010. Retrieved 27 October 2016.
  14. ^ Gallagher, Brendan (20 July 2010). "Tour de France 2010, stage 16: Pierrick Fédrigo claims third in a row win for French". The Daily Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Archived from the original on 2016-09-10. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  15. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2011. p. 24. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 September 2011. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  16. ^ "Geraint Thomas: "I had goosebumps on the Tourmalet"". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. 21 July 2011. Archived from the original on 18 October 2016. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  17. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2012. p. 24. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 July 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2015.
  18. ^ Pickering, Edward (18 July 2012). "Stage 16 analysis: Voeckler is king of the Queen Stage". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Archived from the original on 2015-09-21. Retrieved 16 August 2015.
  19. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2013. p. 24. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2015.
  20. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2015. p. 24. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 August 2016. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  21. ^ "Nibali crowns it all at the last summit – News stage 18 – Tour de France 2014". Tour de France. Amaury Sport Organisation. 24 July 2014. Archived from the original on 12 October 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  22. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2015. p. 24. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 June 2015. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  23. ^ Fletcher, Patrick (15 July 2015). "Majka goes on solo romp to win in Cauterets". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Archived from the original on 2015-09-26. Retrieved 15 July 2015.
  24. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2016. p. 19. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 July 2016. Retrieved 2 July 2016.
  25. ^ "Pinot to shift focus to king of the mountains classification". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 9 July 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-07-12. Retrieved 10 July 2016.
  26. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2017. p. 19. Archived (PDF) from the original on 18 July 2017. Retrieved 18 July 2017.
  27. ^ Race regulations (PDF). Tour de France. Paris: Amaury Sport Organisation. 2018. p. 19. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 July 2018. Retrieved 2 July 2018.
  28. ^ Lowe, Felix (27 July 2018). "Tour de France 2018: Geraint Thomas extends lead as Primoz Roglic zips to Stage 19 win". Eurosport. Discovery Communications. Archived from the original on 2018-07-31. Retrieved 30 July 2018.