SpaceX CRS-18

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SpaceX CRS-18
ISS-60 SpaceX CRS-18 Dragon approaches the ISS (1).jpg
Dragon C108.3 approaching the ISS
Mission typeISS resupply
OperatorSpaceX
COSPAR ID2019-044A
SATCAT no.44446Edit this on Wikidata
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftDragon C108.3
Spacecraft typeDragon CRS
ManufacturerSpaceX
Dry mass4,200 kg (9,300 lb)
DimensionsHeight: 6.1 m (20 ft)
Diameter: 3.7 m (12 ft)
Start of mission
Launch date25 July 2019 22:01 UTC[1]
RocketFalcon 9
Launch siteCape Canaveral SLC-40
ContractorSpaceX
End of mission
DisposalRecovered
Landing date27 August 2019 20:20 (2019-08-27UTC20:21) UTC[2]
Landing sitePacific Ocean,
off Baja California
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric
RegimeLow Earth
Inclination51.6°
Berthing at ISS
Berthing portHarmony nadir
RMS capture27 July 13:11 UTC[3]
Berthing date27 July 2019 16:01 UTC[4]
Unberthing date27 August 2019 12:25 UTC[5]
RMS release27 August 2019 14:59 UTC[5]
Time berthed30 days, 20 hours, 24 minutes
NASA SpX-18 mission patch
NASA SpX-18 mission patch  

SpaceX CRS-18, also known as SpX-18, was SpaceX's 18th flight to the International Space Station under the Commercial Resupply Services program for NASA. It was launched on 25 July 2019 aboard a Falcon 9 rocket.[6][7]

The same Dragon capsule has previously flown to the ISS in April 2015 and December 2017.[8] This was the first time a capsule was used for a third flight.

Primary payload[edit]

CRS-18 launch

In February 2016, it was announced that NASA had awarded a contract extension to SpaceX for five CRS additional missions (CRS-16 to CRS-20).[9]

NASA has contracted for the CRS-18 mission from SpaceX and therefore determines the primary payload, date/time of launch, and orbital parameters for the Dragon space capsule. It carried the third International Docking Adapter (IDA-3).[10]

The following is a breakdown of cargo bound for the ISS:[11]

  • Science investigations: 1,192 kg (2,628 lb)
  • Crew supplies: 233 kg (514 lb)
  • Vehicle hardware: 157 kg (346 lb)
  • Spacewalk equipment: 157 kg (346 lb)
  • Computer resources: 17 kg (37 lb)
  • External payloads: IDA-3 534 kg (1,177 lb)[12]

The Dragon spacecraft also featured a handful of ceramic heat shield tiles, meant to flight-test a critical component of the SpaceX Starship spacecraft.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Clark, Stephen (July 25, 2019). "New docking port, spacesuit and supplies en route to space station". Spaceflight Now. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  2. ^ Bergin, Chris (August 27, 2019). "CRS-18 Dragon completes mission with Pacific Ocean Splashdown". NASA SpaceflightNow. Retrieved August 31, 2019.
  3. ^ Dragon Captured With New Science Experiments
  4. ^ Dragon Installed to Station’s Harmony Module for Cargo Operations
  5. ^ a b Live coverage: Dragon supply ship heading back to Earth today
  6. ^ "Launch Schedule". Spaceflight Now. July 19, 2019. Retrieved July 19, 2019.
  7. ^ SpaceX (July 25, 2019), CRS-18 Mission, retrieved July 25, 2019
  8. ^ @SpaceX (July 19, 2019). "The Dragon spacecraft supporting this mission previously visited the @space_station in April 2015 and December 2017" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  9. ^ de Selding, Peter B. (February 24, 2016). "SpaceX wins 5 new space station cargo missions in NASA contract estimated at $700 million". Space News. Retrieved February 24, 2016.
  10. ^ Pietrobon, Steven (August 20, 2018). "United States Commercial ELV Launch Manifest". Retrieved August 21, 2018.
  11. ^ "spaceflightnow.com/2019/07/25/new-docking-port-spacesuit-and-supplies-en-route-to-space-station". July 25, 2019. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  12. ^ "SpaceX's Cargo Dragon to Deliver New Space Station Docking Adapter for Commercial Crew Spacecraft". NASA. July 12, 2019.
  13. ^ Ralph, Eric. "SpaceX testing ceramic Starship heat shield tiles on flight-proven CRS-18 Cargo Dragon". Teslarati. Retrieved July 24, 2019.

External links[edit]