Spacecom

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For other uses, see Spacecom (disambiguation).
Space Communication Ltd.
Public
Traded as TASESCC
Industry Communications
Founded 1993
Revenue IncreaseUS$ 109.9 million (2014)
IncreaseUS$ 22.4 million (2014)
IncreaseUS$ 11.3 million (2014)
Total equity IncreaseUS$ 149.5 million (2014)
Parent Eurocom Group
Website www.amos-spacecom.com

Spacecom, or Space Communication (Hebrew: חלל תקשורת‎‎), is a communications satellite operator in the Middle East, European Union and North America headquartered in the city of Ramat Gan, Israel. Spacecom operates two satellites at orbital position 4° West – AMOS 2 and AMOS 3 – as well as other AMOS satellites.

History[edit]

Spacecom was established in 1993 with a defined goal of marketing AMOS 1, a newly built communication satellite manufactured by Israel Aerospace Industries. In 2003 Spacecom launched its second satellite, AMOS 2, owned entirely by the company. In 2008 AMOS 3 satellite was launched to replace AMOS 1 and to increase coverage and traffic abilities.[1]

Until 2005, Spacecom was a private company controlled by four companies, including IAI and Eurocom Group. It went public on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange in 2005.[2][3][4]

In August of 2016, Spacecom shareholders agreed to sell the company for $285 million to Beijing Xinwei Technology Group via a Luxembourg business entity. [5]

Coverage[edit]

Spacecom satellites provide coverage to most of the Middle East, East-Central Europe and an Atlantic bridge from those areas to North America. [6]

Services[edit]

Fleet[edit]

Main article: Amos (satellite)

Former

  • AMOS 1
  • AMOS 5 (17° E) – Israeli satellite launched from Kazakhstan in 2011 by Russia's Proton-M carrier rocket to provide services to customers in Africa.[7][8] AMOS 5 initiated commercial operations in early 2012 with C- and Ku-band beams.[9] On 21 November 2015 all communications with the Amos-5 satellite were lost.[10]

In orbit

  • AMOS 2 (4° W)
  • AMOS 3 (4° W)
  • AMOS 4 (65° E) – was successfully launched on August 31, 2013 from Baikonur, Kazakhstan.[2] It will offer coverage across Southeast Asia along with high power coverage beams offering communication links from East Asia to the Middle East.

Upcoming

This was originally scheduled for 2014[12]

Name Bus Payload Order Launch Launch Vehicle Launch Result Launch Weight Status Remarks
AMOS-1 AMOS 7 Ku band N/A 1996-05-16 Ariane 44L Success 961 kg (2,119 lb) N/A Launched along Palapa C2. Sold in 2009 to Intelsat as Intelsat 24.[13]
AMOS-2 AMOS 22 Ku band N/A 2003-12-27 Soyuz-FG/Fregat Success 1,370 kg (3,020 lb) N/A [14]
AMOS-3 AMOS 15 Ku band and Ka band N/A 2008-04-28 Zenit-3SLB Success 1,250 kg (2,760 lb) N/A Straight GEO launch.[15]
AMOS-5 Еkspress-1000H 18 C band and 16 Ku band N/A 2011-12-11 Proton-M/Briz-M Success 1,972 kg (4,348 lb) Failed on orbit Launched along Luch 5A. Failed on November 21, 2015.[16]
AMOS-4 AMOS 4000 8 Ku band and 4 Ka band N/A 2013-08-31 Zenit-3SLB Success 4,250 kg (9,370 lb) N/A [17]
AMOS-6 AMOS 4000 2 S band, 43 Ku band and Ka band 2012 Planned August 17, 2016 Falcon 9 Full Thrust Planned 5,500 kg (12,100 lb) N/A Electric propulsion for station keeping.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Campbell, Susan J. (7 November 2011). "Spacecom Seeks to Dominate Satellite Communications Industry with AMOS Line". TCMnet.com. Retrieved 14 November 2011. 
  2. ^ "Spacecom: Amos 2 will reach full capacity by year-end". Globes. 22 March 2004. Retrieved 12 December 2011. 
  3. ^ חלל תקשורת סיימה בהצלחה את השלב המוסדי בהנפקה. Globes (in Hebrew). 21 December 2005. Retrieved 12 December 2011. 
  4. ^ Donald H. Martin; Paul Robert Anderson; Lucy Bartamian (2007). Communication Satellites (5th ed.). Aerospace Press. p. 581. ISBN 978-1-884989-19-3. Retrieved 12 December 2011. Prior to March 2005 Spacecom had been a privately held company. 
  5. ^ "Chinese group to buy Israel's Spacecom satellite operator for $285 million". 24 August 2016. Retrieved 24 August 2016. 
  6. ^ Geyfman, Hadass (July 2011). Pattie, Waldt, ed. "Achieving Major Sat Status — Spacecom's AMOS Fleet" (PDF). SatMagazine. Sonoma, California: Satnews Publishers. 4 (5): 106–110. Retrieved 15 November 2011. 
  7. ^ Bergin, Chris (11 December 2011). "Russian Proton M launches Luch-5A and AMOS-5 satellites". NASAspaceflight.com. Retrieved 12 December 2011. 
  8. ^ "Spacecom's Amos 5 communications satellite begins operations". Globes. 24 January 2012. Retrieved 16 February 2012. 
  9. ^ Briel, Robert (1 February 2012). "SatLink launches Amos-5 platforms". Broadband TV News. Retrieved 16 February 2012. 
  10. ^ "Contact Lost With Israeli Communication Satellite Amos 5". 
  11. ^ spaceflightnow launch schedule
  12. ^ Ben Gedalyahu, Tzvi (12 December 2011). "Kazakhstan Launches Israel's Amos 5 Communications Satellite". Arutz Sheva. Retrieved 12 December 2011. 
  13. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 1 → Intelsat 24". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-08-06. 
  14. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 2". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-08-06. 
  15. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 3 (AMOS 60)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-08-06. 
  16. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 5". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-08-06. 
  17. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 4". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-08-06. 
  18. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "AMOS 6". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-08-06. 

External links[edit]