Spain women's national football team

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Spain
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)La Roja (The Red One)[1]
AssociationRoyal Spanish Football Federation
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachJorge Vilda
CaptainIrene Paredes
Most capsAlexia Putellas (100)
Top scorerJennifer Hermoso (45)
FIFA codeESP
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 8 Decrease 1 (5 August 2022)[2]
Highest7 (March 2022)
Lowest21 (June–August 2004, March 2008)
First international
Unofficial
 Spain 3–3 Portugal 
(Murcia, Spain; 21 February 1971)
Official
 Spain 0–1 Portugal 
(A Guarda, Spain; 5 February 1983)
Biggest win
 Spain 17–0 Slovenia 
(Palamós, Spain; 20 March 1994)
Biggest defeat
 Spain 0–8 Sweden 
(Gandia, Spain; 2 June 1996)
World Cup
Appearances3 (first in 2015)
Best resultRound of 16 (2019)
European Championship
Appearances4 (first in 1997)
Best resultSemi-finals (1997)
Spain women's national team in 2018

The Spain women's national football team (Spanish: Selección Española de Fútbol Femenina) has represented Spain in international women's football competition since 1980, and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

Spain have qualified two times for the FIFA Women's World Cup and three times for the UEFA Women's Championship, reaching the semifinals in 1997. In contrast to these modest achievements at senior level, their youth teams have one of the best records in the world across the early 21st century and enjoyed great success in 2018 in particular, winning two continental titles (U-17 and U-19), and reaching the two worldwide finals (winning the U-17 World Cup and runners-up in the U-20 World Cup.

Coinciding with the rise of Barcelona at club level, Spain broke into the top 10 of the FIFA international rankings in the early 2020s. Their players collected the 2020 UEFA awards for best goalkeeper, defender, midfielder, forward and overall best player – the first time players from a single nation won all the categories.

History[edit]

Early years[edit]

After underground women's football clubs started appearing in Spain around 1970 one of its instigators, Rafael Muga, decided to create a national team. It was an unofficial project as football was considered an unsuitable sport for women by both the Royal Spanish Football Federation and National Movement's Women's Section, which organized women's sports in Francoist Spain. When asked about the initiative in January 1971 RFEF president José Luis Pérez Payá answered I'm not against women's football, but I don't like it either. I don't think it's feminine from an esthetic point of view. Women are not favored wearing shirt and trousers. Any regional dress would fit them better.[3]

One month later, on 21 February 1971, the unofficial Spanish national team, including Conchi Sánchez, who played professionally in the Italian league, made its debut in Murcia's La Condomina against Portugal, ending in a 3–3 draw. The team wasn't allowed to wear RFEF's crest and the referee couldn't wear an official uniform either. On 15 July, with a 5-days delay for transfer issues, it played its first game abroad against Italy in Turin's Stadio Comunale, suffering an 8–1 defeat. It was then invited to the 2nd edition of unofficial women's world cup (Mundialito 1981), but RFEF forbid them to take part in the competition.[4] Despite these conditions Spain was entrusted hosting the 1972 World Cup. RFEF vetoed the project, and the competition was cancelled and disbanded. The unofficial Spanish team itself broke up shortly after.

1980s: Officiality of the team[edit]

After the transition to democracy in the second half of the decade RFEF finally accepted women's football in November 1980, creating first a national cup and next a national team, which finally made its debut under coach Teodoro Nieto on 5 February 1983 in A Guarda, Pontevedra. The opponent was again Portugal, which defeated Spain 0–1. The team subsequently played 2-leg friendlies against France and Switzerland drawing with both opponents in Aranjuez and Barcelona and losing in Perpignan before it finally clinched its first victory in Zürich (0–1).[5] On 27 April 1985 it played its first official match in the 1987 European Championship's qualification, losing 1–0 against Hungary. After losing the first four matches Spain defeated Switzerland and drew with Italy to end third. The team also ended in its group's bottom positions in the subsequent 1989 and 1991 qualifiers. After the former Nieto was replaced by Ignacio Quereda, who has coached the team since 1 September 1988. Teodoro Nieto left the most International Footballer Conchi sanchez (Amancio) out of the Spanish Team even when the player was the first Capitain during the 70s, She was playing in Italy at the time winning championships and Italian Cups, there was not substantial reasons to leave such extraordinary player out at the peak of her career, the damaged was done to such brilliant player who loved to play for her country and fully deserved more respect and recognition.

1990s and 2000s: Growing up[edit]

The 1995 Euro qualifying marked an improvement as Spain ended 2nd, one point from England, which qualified for the final tournament. In these qualifiers Spain attained its biggest victory to date, a 17–0 over Slovenia. In the 1997 Euro qualifying it made a weaker performance, including a record 0–8 loss against Sweden in Gandia, but the European Championship was expanded to eight teams and Spain still made it to the repechage, where it defeated England on a 3–2 aggregate to qualify for the competition for the first time. In the first stage the team drew 1–1 against France, lost 0–1 against host Sweden, and beat 1–0 Russia to qualify on goal average over France to the semifinals, where it was defeated 2–1 by Italy. All three goals were scored by Ángeles Parejo.

This success was followed by a long series of unsuccessful qualifiers. In the 1999 World Cup's qualifying Spain ended last for the first time, not winning a single game. In the 2001 Euro's it made it to the repechage, where it suffered a 3–10 aggregate defeat against Denmark. In the 2003 World Cup's it again ended last despite starting with a 6–1 win over Iceland. In the 2005 Euro's, where a 9–1 win over Belgium was followed by a 5-game non scoring streak, it ended 3rd behind Denmark and Norway. In the 2007 World Cup's the team again ended 3rd behind Denmark and Finland despite earning 7 more points.

In the 2009 Euro's Spain made its better performance since the 1995 qualifiers, narrowly missing qualification as England clinched the top position by overcoming a 2–0 in the final match's second half. Spain had to play the repechage, where it lost both games against the Netherlands. In the 2011 World Cup's Spain again ended 2nd, with no repechage, after England again overcame a half-time 2–0 in their second confrontation.[6]

2010s: First World Cups[edit]

Spain achieved 16 years later a place for the final stage of a European Championship. The team qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2013, after beating Scotland in the qualifiers playoff. In the group stage, a win over England and a draw against Russia was enough to qualify for the quarterfinals, where they were eliminated by Norway.

Two years later, Spain qualified for the first time ever to a World Cup, winning nine of its ten matches of the qualifying round. In the group stage of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. Their campaign, however, ended up being a disaster. Spain managed only a 1–1 draw into the weakest team in the group, Costa Rica, before losing 0–1 to Brazil. In the last match with South Korea, they still lost 1–2 after an initial lead, becoming the worst European team in the tournament. After the World Cup, the 23 players on the roster issued a collective statement for the end of Ignacio Quereda's reign as head coach.[7] Later that summer, Quereda stepped down and was replaced by Jorge Vilda, who had previously coached the U-19 team, and was on the shortlist for the 2014 FIFA World Coach of the Year.[8][9]

Spain has achieved to qualify for the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 by winning all the matches and ahead in 11 points to the second classified. In 2017 the national team participated for the first time in the Algarve Cup winning the tournament.[10] However, its performance in the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 was very disappointing: only one match won (against Portugal, the worst ranked team in Euro), two defeats against England (0–2) and Scotland (0–1) in group stage, Miraculously Spain advanted to the quarter-finals, where losing against Austria in a quarter-final finishing 0–0 after extra time, then 3–5 in penalty shoot-out. Eventually, the national football team was eliminated after more than 345 minutes without scoring a single goal.

At the 2019 Women's World Cup, Spain were in Group B with China PR, South Africa, and Germany. They finished second in the group to progress to the knockout stage of a World Cup for the first time in their history.[11] However, the team was eliminated in the round of 16 by the eventual champions United States.

In October 2019, the federation announced the creation of España Promesas (essentially Spain B), a team for players too old for younger age groups but not in the latest full squad, to provide training and occasional match experience for those in consideration for the future,[12] that was later reconverted and renamed Spain under-23.

Competitive record[edit]

FIFA Women's World Cup[edit]

FIFA Women's World Cup record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
China 1991 Did not qualify 1991 UEFA Women's Championship
Sweden 1995 UEFA Women's Euro 1995
United States 1999 6 0 2 4 5 10
United States 2003 6 2 0 4 8 11
China 2007 8 4 2 2 19 14
Germany 2011 8 6 1 1 37 4
Canada 2015 Group stage 20th 3 0 1 2 2 4 10 9 1 0 42 2
France 2019 Round of 16 12th 4 1 1 2 4 4 8 8 0 0 25 2
AustraliaNew Zealand 2023 Qualified 6 6 0 0 45 0
Total 3/9 7 1 2 4 6 8 53 36 6 11 181 43

UEFA Women's Championship[edit]

UEFA Women's Championship record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1984 Did not enter Declined Participation
Norway 1987 Did not qualify 6 1 1 4 7 9
West Germany 1989 8 2 2 4 4 8
Denmark 1991 6 0 2 4 3 13
Italy 1993 4 1 1 2 2 6
England Germany Norway Sweden1995 6 3 3 0 29 0
Norway Sweden 1997 Semi-finals 4th 4 1 1 2 3 4 6 1 2 3 8 15
Germany 2001 Did not qualify 6 1 1 4 6 17
England 2005 8 2 1 5 10 10
Finland 2009 8 5 2 1 24 7
Sweden 2013 Quarter-finals 7th 4 1 1 2 5 7 10 6 2 2 43 14
Netherlands 2017 Quarter-finals 8th 4 1 1 2 2 3 8 8 0 0 40 2
England 2022 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 0 2 6 5 8 7 1 0 48 1
Total 4/13 16 5 3 8 16 19 84 37 18 29 224 102

Other tournaments[edit]

Year Cup Pos P W D L GF GA
1992 Bulgaria Grand Hotel Varna 4th 4 3 0 1 8 1
1993 Catalonia Torneig Internacional Ciutat de Tarragona 4th 2 0 1 1 2 3
1995 Bulgaria Grand Hotel Varna 3rd 5 2 1 2 9 12
1996 Slovakia Women's Tournament Slovakia 4th 3 0 2 1 2 6
2005 Canary Islands Torneo Internacional de Maspalomas 2nd 2 0 2 0 2 2
2017 Portugal Algarve Cup 1st 4 3 1 0 6 1
2018 Cyprus Cyprus Cup 1st 4 3 1 0 6 0
2019 Portugal Algarve Cup 7th 3 2 0 1 4 3
2020 United States SheBelieves Cup 2nd 3 2 0 1 4 2
2022 England Arnold Clark Cup 2nd 3 1 2 0 2 1

Results and fixtures[edit]

  • The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.
Legend

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixtures

2021[edit]

16 September 2021 World Cup 2023 qualifying Faroe Islands  0–10  Spain Tórshavn
18:00 Report
Stadium: Tórsvøllur
Attendance: 1,066
Referee: Paula Brady (Football Association of Ireland)
21 September 2021 World Cup 2023 qualifying Hungary  0–7  Spain Budapest
20:00 Report
Stadium: Hidegkuti Nándor Stadion
Attendance: 510
Referee: Sabina Bolić (Croatia)
21 October 2021 Friendly Spain  3–0  Morocco Cáceres
20:00
Report Stadium: Estadio Príncipe Felipe
Attendance: 2,044
Referee: Merima Čelik (Bosnia and Herzegovina)
26 October 2021 World Cup 2023 qualifying Ukraine  0–6  Spain Kovalivka
17:00 Report
Stadium: Kolos Stadium
Referee: Galiya Echeva (Bulgaria)
25 November 2021 World Cup 2023 qualifying Spain  12–0  Faroe Islands Seville
21:00
Report Stadium: La Cartuja
Attendance: 1,000
Referee: Triinu Laos (Estonia)
30 November 2021 World Cup 2023 qualifying Spain  8–0  Scotland Seville
21:00
Report Stadium: La Cartuja
Attendance: 1,200
Referee: Lina Lehtovaara (Finland)

2022[edit]

17 February 2022 Arnold Clark Cup Germany  1–1  Spain Middlesbrough, United Kingdom
14:30 Report Stadium: Riverside Stadium
Attendance: 249
Referee: Tess Oloffson (Sweden)
20 February 2022 Arnold Clark Cup England  0–0  Spain Norwich
15:15 Report Stadium: Carrow Road
Attendance: 14,284
Referee: Mihaela Tepusa (Romania)
23 February 2022 Arnold Clark Cup Canada  0–1  Spain Wolverhampton, United Kingdom
14:30 Report Stadium: Molineux Stadium
Attendance: 877
Referee: Cheryl Foster (Wales)
7 April 2022 Friendly Spain  1–1  Brazil Alicante
20:00 Report
Stadium: Estadio José Rico Pérez
Attendance: 8,833
Referee: Rebecca Welch (England)
12 April 2022 (2022-04-12) World Cup 2023 qualifying Scotland  0–2  Spain Glasgow
19:35 Report
Stadium: Hampden Park
Attendance: 7,804
Referee: Esther Staubli (Switzerland)
25 June 2022 (2022-06-25) Friendly Spain  7–0  Australia Huelva
21:30
Report Stadium: Nuevo Colombino
Attendance: 6,869
Referee: Monika Mularczyk (Poland)
1 July 2022 (2022-07-01) Friendly Italy  1–1  Spain Castel di Sangro
17:00 Stadium: Stadio Teofilo Patini
20 July 2022 UEFA Euro 2022 QF England  2–1 (a.e.t.)  Spain Brighton and Hove, England
Report Stadium: Falmer Stadium
Attendance: 28,994
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)

Overall official record[edit]

Coaching staff[edit]

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

The following 23 players were called up for the UEFA Women's Euro 2022.[13] On 29 June, Teresa Abelleira replaced Salma Paralluelo who withdrew following a injury.[14][15] On 6 July, Amaiur Sarriegi replaced Alexia Putellas due to injury.[16]

Caps and goals as of 21 July 2022
No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Dolores Gallardo (1993-06-10)10 June 1993 (aged 29) 37 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
2 2DF Ona Batlle (1999-06-10)10 June 1999 (aged 23) 27 0 England Manchester United
3 2DF Laia Aleixandri (2000-08-25)25 August 2000 (aged 21) 15 2 England Manchester City
4 2DF Irene Paredes (captain) (1991-07-04)4 July 1991 (aged 31) 87 10 Spain Barcelona
5 2DF Ivana Andrés (1994-07-13)13 July 1994 (aged 27) 36 0 Spain Real Madrid
6 3MF Aitana Bonmatí (1998-01-18)18 January 1998 (aged 24) 46 16 Spain Barcelona
7 3MF Irene Guerrero (1996-12-12)12 December 1996 (aged 25) 16 4 Spain Atlético de Madrid
8 3MF Mariona Caldentey (1996-03-19)19 March 1996 (aged 26) 53 19 Spain Barcelona
9 4FW Esther González (1992-12-08)8 December 1992 (aged 29) 26 16 Spain Real Madrid
10 4FW Athenea del Castillo (2000-10-24)24 October 2000 (aged 21) 15 3 Spain Real Madrid
11 3MF Marta Cardona (1995-05-26)26 May 1995 (aged 27) 22 2 Spain Atlético de Madrid
12 3MF Patricia Guijarro (1998-05-17)17 May 1998 (aged 24) 50 10 Spain Barcelona
13 1GK Sandra Paños (1992-11-04)4 November 1992 (aged 29) 55 0 Spain Barcelona
14 4FW Amaiur Sarriegi (2000-12-13) 13 December 2000 (age 21) 13 12 Spain Real Sociedad
15 2DF Leila Ouahabi (1993-03-22)22 March 1993 (aged 29) 52 1 England Manchester City
16 2DF María Pilar León (1995-06-13)13 June 1995 (aged 27) 54 1 Spain Barcelona
17 4FW Lucía García (1998-07-14)14 July 1998 (aged 23) 36 9 England Manchester United
18 3MF Teresa Abelleira (2000-01-09)9 January 2000 (aged 22) 6 0 Spain Real Madrid
19 2DF Olga Carmona (2000-06-12)12 June 2000 (aged 22) 12 0 Spain Real Madrid
20 2DF Andrea Pereira (1993-09-19)19 September 1993 (aged 28) 41 0 Spain Levante
21 3MF Sheila García (1997-03-15)15 March 1997 (aged 25) 11 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
22 4FW Clàudia Pina (2001-08-12)12 August 2001 (aged 20) 6 0 Spain Barcelona
23 1GK Misa Rodríguez (1999-07-22)22 July 1999 (aged 22) 5 0 Spain Real Madrid

Recent call-ups[edit]

  • The following players were also named to a squad in the last 12 months.
Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK María Asunción Quiñones (1996-10-29) 29 October 1996 (age 25) 3 0 Spain Athletic Club v.  Hungary; 21 September 2021 PRE

DF Ainhoa Vicente (1995-08-20) 20 August 1995 (age 26) 5 0 Spain Atlético de Madrid v.  Australia; 25 June 2022 PRE
DF Lucía Rodríguez (1999-05-24) 24 May 1999 (age 23) 0 0 Spain Real Madrid v.  Faroe Islands; 16 September 2021 PRE

MF Alexia Putellas Cruz Roja.svg (1994-02-04)4 February 1994 (aged 28) 100 27 Spain Barcelona UEFA Women's Euro 2022 INJ
MF Nerea Eizagirre (2000-01-04) 4 January 2000 (age 22) 10 2 Spain Real Sociedad v.  Australia; 25 June 2022 PRE
MF Claudia Zornoza (1990-10-29) 29 October 1990 (age 31) 3 0 Spain Real Madrid v.  Australia; 25 June 2022
MF Anna Torrodà (2000-01-21) 21 January 2000 (age 22) 3 0 Spain Valencia v.  Faroe Islands; 25 November 2021
MF Maitane López (1995-03-13) 13 March 1995 (age 27) 1 0 Spain Atlético de Madrid v.  Ukraine; 26 October 2021
MF Marta Corredera PG (1991-08-08) 8 August 1991 (age 30) 85 5 Spain Real Madrid v.  Hungary; 21 September 2021
MF María Alharilla Casado BF (1990-11-13) 13 November 1990 (age 31) 7 1 Spain Levante v.  Faroe Islands; 16 September 2021 PRE

FW Salma Paralluelo Cruz Roja.svg (2003-11-13) 13 November 2003 (age 18) 0 0 Spain Barcelona UEFA Women's Euro 2022 INJ
FW Jennifer Hermoso Cruz Roja.svg (1990-05-09) 9 May 1990 (age 32) 91 45 Mexico Pachuca v.  Scotland; 12 April 2022
FW Alba Redondo (1996-08-27) 27 August 1996 (age 25) 16 5 Spain Levante v.  Faroe Islands; 25 November 2021
FW Candela Andújar (2000-03-26) 26 March 2000 (age 22) 1 0 retired v.  Faroe Islands; 16 September 2021

Previous squads[edit]

Honours[edit]

Titles[edit]

Individual awards[edit]

Other awards[edit]

Records[edit]

Caps and goals as of 21 July 2022.
Players in bold are still active, at least at club level.

Rankings[edit]

Youth teams[edit]

Under-23[edit]

The Spain under-23 is a football team operated under the auspices of the Royal Spanish Football Federation. Its primary role is the development of players in preparation for the senior Spain women's national team.

Under-20[edit]

FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup
2002: did not qualify 2004: 1st round 2006: did not qualify
2008: did not qualify 2010: did not qualify 2012: did not qualify
2014: did not qualify 2016: 5th 2018: Runner-up
2020: Qualified but cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic 2022: Qualified

Under-19[edit]

UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship
2002: Final Round 2003: Final Round 2004: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion
2005: Second Round 2006: Second Round 2007: Final Round
2008: Final Round 2009: Second Round 2010: Final Round
2011: Final Round 2012: Runner-up 2013: did not qualify
2014: Runner-up 2015: Runner-up 2016: Runner-up
2017: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion 2018: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion 2019: Third Place
2020: cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic 2021: cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic 2022: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion

Under-18[edit]

UEFA Women's Under-18 Championship
1998: did not qualify 1999: did not qualify 2000: Runner-up 2001: 4th (last edition)

Under-17[edit]

FIFA Under-17 Women's World Cup
FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup
2008: did not qualify 2010: Third Place 2012: did not qualify
2014: Runner-up 2016: Third Place 2018: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion
2020: cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic
UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship
UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship
2008: did not qualify 2009: Runner-up 2010: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion
2011: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion 2012: did not qualify 2013: Third Place
2014: Runner-up 2015: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion 2016: Runner-up
2017: Runner-up 2018: Nuvola apps mozilla.svg Champion 2019: Third Place
2020: cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic 2021: cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic 2022: Runner-up

Under-16[edit]

There is also a women's national team that represents Spain in international football in under-16 categories and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation. This team usually participates each year in UEFA Women U-16 Development Tournament (although it is not an official tournament) with remarkable success[26]

See also[edit]

Women's football in Spain

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Spain's women add to La Roja euphoria". FIFA. Retrieved 7 December 2012.[dead link]
  2. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 5 August 2022. Retrieved 5 August 2022.
  3. ^ The underground origin of the women's national team. Marca, 23 April 2013. David Menayo
  4. ^ Conchi Amancio's national team shook up the 1970s Spain. As Color, 17 July 2012
  5. ^ The official baptism of the women's national team. Marca, 14 May 2013. David Menayo.
  6. ^ "Why Spain is absent from the World Cup". Fox Soccer. Retrieved 5 August 2012.
  7. ^ Kassouf, Jeff (19 June 2015). "Spain players call firing Ignacio Quereda women's World Cup exit". Equalizer Soccer. Retrieved 8 June 2019.
  8. ^ "Quereda's reign as Spain coach ends after 27 years". Equalizer Soccer. 31 July 2015. Retrieved 4 September 2015.
  9. ^ "Vilda appointed coach of Spain's women's team". FIFA.com. 30 July 2015. Archived from the original on 1 August 2015. Retrieved 4 September 2015.
  10. ^ Muñoz, Antonio D. (8 March 2017). "Champions of Algarve Cup". RFEF. Retrieved 8 June 2019.
  11. ^ "South Africa 0–4 Germany, China 0–0 Spain: Women's World Cup clockwatch – live!". The Guardian. 17 June 2019. Retrieved 17 June 2019.
  12. ^ Oficial: La RFEF crea la Selección Absoluta Promesas, una nueva selección femenina de fútbol (Official: The RFEF creates the Absolute Promises Selection, a new women's team), SEfutbol (in Spanish), 29 October 2019
  13. ^ "Esta es la lista de convocadas por la Selección española femenina para la EURO 2022". sefutbol.com (in Spanish). 27 June 2022.
  14. ^ "OFICIAL I Salma Paralluelo abandona la concentración de la Selección española". sefutbol.com (in Spanish). 29 June 2022.
  15. ^ "OFICIAL I Teresa Abelleira entra en la lista de la Selección Femenina para la Eurocopa". sefutbol.com (in Spanish). 29 June 2022.
  16. ^ Bosher, Charlotte Harpur and Luke. "Putellas ruled out of Euros after ACL injury, Sarriegi called up". The Athletic.
  17. ^ "Grand Hotel Varna Tournament official awards". rsssf.com. Retrieved 22 July 2022.
  18. ^ "La Selección española Absoluta femenina, distinguida en los Premios Nacionales del Deporte 2014" [The Spanish women's national team honored at the 2014 National Sports Awards]. RFEF (in Spanish). 10 July 2015. Retrieved 8 June 2019.
  19. ^ "UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (June 2016)" (PDF).
  20. ^ "UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (September 2016)" (PDF).
  21. ^ UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (November 2017)
  22. ^ "UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (June 2018)" (PDF).
  23. ^ "UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (September 2018)" (PDF).
  24. ^ "UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (February 2021)" (PDF).
  25. ^ Ranking women's national football teams based on a formula invented and developed by Mark Ziaian
  26. ^ "The U16s debut with a brilliant victory at the UEFA Development Tournament".

External links[edit]