2015 Spanish local elections

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2015 Spanish local elections

← 2011 24 May 2015 2019 →

67,515 councillors in 8,122 municipal councils
1,040 seats in 38 provincial deputations
Opinion polls
Registered35,094,964 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1.1%
Turnout22,746,489 (64.8%)
Red Arrow Down.svg1.4 pp
  First party Second party Third party
  Mariano Rajoy 2015j (cropped).jpg Pedro Sánchez 2015h (cropped).jpg Pablo Iglesias 2015 (cropped).jpg
Leader Mariano Rajoy Pedro Sánchez Pablo Iglesias
Party PP PSOE Podemos
Leader since 2 September 2003 26 July 2014 15 November 2014
Last election 26,510 c., 37.5% 21,783 c., 27.8% Did not contest
Seats won 22,750 20,818 699
Seat change Red Arrow Down.svg3,760 Red Arrow Down.svg965 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg699
Popular vote 6,057,767 5,603,112 1,689,254
Percentage 27.0% 25.0% 7.5%
Swing Red Arrow Down.svg10.5 pp Red Arrow Down.svg2.8 pp New party

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Albert Rivera 2015c (cropped).jpg CayoLaraIU2.jpg Artur Mas 2015 (cropped).jpg
Leader Albert Rivera Cayo Lara Artur Mas
Party C's IU CiU
Leader since 9 July 2006 14 December 2008 27 November 2004
Last election 10 c., 0.2% 2,650 c., 7.4% 3,896 c., 3.5%
Seats won 1,527 2,929 3,358
Seat change Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1,517 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg279 Red Arrow Down.svg538
Popular vote 1,467,663 1,447,402 670,891
Percentage 6.6% 6.5% 3.0%
Swing Green Arrow Up Darker.svg6.4 pp Red Arrow Down.svg0.9 pp Red Arrow Down.svg0.5 pp

SpainProvinceMapMunicipal2015.png
Provincial results map for municipal elections

The 2015 Spanish local elections were held on Sunday, 24 May 2015, to elect all 67,515 councillors in the 8,122 municipalities of Spain and all 1,040 seats in 38 provincial deputations.[1] The elections were held simultaneously with regional elections in thirteen autonomous communities, as well as local elections in the three foral deputations of the Basque Country and the ten island councils in the Balearic and Canary Islands.

Overview[edit]

Background[edit]

After Podemos' success in the European Parliament election of 2014, the party decided not to directly contest the local elections scheduled for May 2015, but instead to focus on the regional and general elections to be held throughout 2015. Instead, they opted for the Guanyem Barcelona formula, popular unity municipal candidacies comprising different parties and social movements. The model was reproduced in many cities under the name Ganemos (Let's Win).[2]

United Left, the traditional left-wing third party of Spain, also started debating on joining these local coalitions.[3] However, this option was not well received by some party sectors, particularly their Madrid branch, who feared that the party would lose its identity if it joined these coalitions.[4] The first attempt at a joint candidacy that included Podemos and United Left, among others, succeeded in Barcelona with Guanyem Barcelona, later Barcelona en Comú, under activist Ada Colau's leadership.[5]

Another national party that decided to participate in most of these unitary candidacies was Equo,[6] as well as minoritary parties like PUM+J, Socialist Alternative, Republican Alternative, ANOVA, or Initiative for Catalonia Greens.[7][8][9] The unitary lists also included individuals from social movements like the anti-eviction PAH, 15M, o the so-called mareas (Spanish for "tides") made up of workers from different service sectors like teachers, Public Health System workers or young people forced to migrate as a consequence of the 2008–15 Spanish financial crisis.

Electoral system[edit]

Municipal elections

Municipalities in Spain were local corporations with independent legal personality. They had a governing body, the municipal council or corporation, composed of a mayor, deputy mayors and a plenary assembly of councillors. Voting for the local assemblies was on the basis of universal suffrage, with all nationals over eighteen, registered in the corresponding municipality and in full enjoyment of all political rights entitled to vote. The mayor was in turn elected by the plenary assembly, with a legal clause providing for the candidate of the most-voted party to be automatically elected to the post in the event no other candidate was to gather an absolute majority of votes.

Local councillors were elected using the D'Hondt method and a closed list proportional representation, with a threshold of 5 percent of valid votes—which included blank ballots—being applied in each local council. Parties not reaching the threshold were not taken into consideration for seat distribution. Councillors were allocated to municipal councils based on the following scale:

Population Councillors
<100 3
100–250 5
251–1,000 7
1,001–2,000 9
2,001–5,000 11
5,001–10,000 13
10,001–20,000 17
20,001–50,000 21
50,001–100,000 25
>100,001 +1 per each 100,000 inhabitants or fraction
+1 if total is an even number

Councillors of municipalities with populations below 250 inhabitants were elected under an open list partial block voting, with electors voting for individual candidates instead of parties: for up to four candidates in municipalities with populations between 100 and 250 inhabitants; and for up to two candidates in municipalities below 100. This did not apply to municipalities whose geographical location or the best management of municipal interests or other circumstances made it advisable to be organized through the open council system (Spanish: régimen de concejo abierto), in which voters would directly elect the local major.[10][11][12]

The electoral law provided that parties, federations, coalitions and groupings of electors were allowed to present lists of candidates. However, groupings of electors were required to secure the signature of a determined amount of the electors registered in the municipality for which they sought election:

  • At least 1 percent of the electors in municipalities below 5,000 inhabitants, provided that the number of signers was more than double that of councillors at stake.
  • At least 100 signatures in municipalities between 5,001 and 10,000.
  • At least 500 signatures in municipalities between 10,001 and 50,000.
  • At least 1,500 signatures in municipalities between 50,001 and 150,000.
  • At least 3,000 signatures in municipalities between 150,001 and 300,000.
  • At least 5,000 signatures in municipalities between 300,001 and 1,000,000.
  • At least 8,000 signatures in municipalities over 1,000,001.

Electors were barred from signing for more than one list of candidates. Concurrently, parties and federations intending to enter in coalition to take part jointly at an election were required to inform the relevant Electoral Commission within ten days of the election being called.[10][11]

Deputations and island councils

Provincial deputations were the governing bodies of provinces in Spain, having an administration role of municipal activities and composed of a provincial president, an administrative body, and a plenary. Basque provinces had foral deputations instead—called Juntas Generales—, whereas deputations for single-province autonomous communities were abolished: their functions transferred to the corresponding regional parliaments. For insular provinces, such as the Balearic and Canary Islands, deputations were replaced by island councils in each of the islands or group of islands. For Majorca, Menorca, Ibiza and Formentera this figure was referred to in Spanish as consejo insular (Catalan: consell insular), whereas for Gran Canaria, Tenerife, Fuerteventura, La Gomera, El Hierro, Lanzarote and La Palma its name was cabildo insular.

Most deputations were indirectly elected by local councillors from municipalities in each judicial district. Seats were allocated to provincial deputations based on the following scale:

Population Seats
<500,000 25
500,001–1,000,000 27
1,000,001–3,500,000 31
>3,500,001 51

Island councils and foral deputations were elected directly by electors under their own, specific electoral regulations.[10][11]

Opinion polls[edit]

Municipal elections[edit]

Overall[edit]

Councillor share for different parties in the elections.

  PP (33.70%)
  PSOE (30.83%)
  CiU (4.97%)
  IU (4.34%)
  ERC–AM (3.54%)
  C's (2.26%)
  EH Bildu (1.77%)
  EAJ/PNV (1.51%)
  PAR (1.36%)
  Compromís (1.07%)
  Podemos (1.04%)
  BNG (0.69%)
  Other (12.92%)
Summary of the 24 May 2015 municipal election results in Spain
Parties and coalitions Popular vote Councillors
Votes % ±pp Total +/-
People's Party (PP) 6,057,767 27.05 –10.49 22,750 –3,760
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 5,603,112 25.02 –2.82 20,818 –965
We Can and allies (Podemos) 1,689,254 7.54 New 699 +699
We Can-supported candidacies (Podemos) 1,187,594 5.30 New 454 +454
We CanUnited LeftICV (Podemos–IU–ICV) 465,707 2.08 New 217 +217
We CanPopular Unity Candidacy (Podemos–CUP) 35,953 0.16 New 28 +28
Citizens–Party of the Citizenry (C's) 1,467,663 6.55 +6.36 1,527 +1,517
United Left (IU) 1,447,402 6.46 –0.99 2,929 +279
United Left (IU)2 1,216,841 5.43 –0.81 2,491 +254
Initiative for Catalonia Greens–EUiA–Agreement (ICV–EUiA–E) 165,103 0.74 –0.33 325 –74
SonUnited LeftAnova (Son–EU–Anova)3 65,458 0.29 +0.16 113 +99
Convergence and Union (CiU) 670,891 3.00 –0.46 3,358 –538
Republican Left of Catalonia–Municipal Agreement (ERC–AM) 513,169 2.29 +1.08 2,388 +966
Commitment Coalition (Compromís) 381,925 1.71 +0.82 725 +344
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 360,143 1.61 +0.16 1,019 +137
Basque Country Unite (EH Bildu)4 308,829 1.38 –0.15 1,195 +15
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) 232,917 1.04 –1.02 129 –23
Popular Unity Candidacy–Active People (CUP–PA) 209,352 0.93 +0.65 357 +256
Galician Nationalist Bloc–Open Assemblies (BNG) 189,465 0.85 –0.31 468 –122
Canarian CoalitionCanarian Nationalist Party (CC–PNC) 156,543 0.70 –0.24 305 –99
Andalusian Party (PA) 150,655 0.67 –0.36 319 –157
Let's Win (Ganemos) 147,609 0.66 New 130 +130
Navarrese People's Union (UPN) 80,725 0.36 –0.03 281 –41
New Canaries–Broad Front (NC–FA) 74,745 0.33 +0.08 90 +28
Regionalist Party of Cantabria (PRC) 71,952 0.32 +0.01 325 +3
More (MésMpM) 66,795 0.30 +0.13 153 +66
More for Majorca (Més)5 60,419 0.27 +0.12 130 +50
More for Menorca (MpM)6 6,376 0.03 +0.01 23 +16
Asturias Forum (FAC) 65,567 0.29 –0.25 83 –75
Vox–Family and Life Party (Vox–PFyV) 64,385 0.29 New 17 +17
Aragonese Party (PAR) 59,449 0.27 –0.07 916 –76
Anti-Bullfighting Party Against Mistreatment of Animals (PACMA) 53,118 0.24 +0.12 0 ±0
Participatory Democracy (Participa) 43,437 0.19 New 11 +11
Aragonese Union (CHA) 42,119 0.19 –0.05 163 –21
Equo (eQuo)7 33,967 0.15 –0.25 39 –2
Proposal for the Isles (El Pi)8 31,913 0.14 +0.02 90 +18
Yes to the Future (GBai)9 29,593 0.13 –0.03 59 –11
Citizens of Democratic Centre (CCD) 28,846 0.13 +0.10 46 +33
Platform for Catalonia (PxC) 27,384 0.12 –0.17 8 –59
Yes We Can Alternative (ASSP)10 25,691 0.11 +0.03 40 +20
Yes We Can, Citizen Alternative for Madrid (SSPACxM) 25,672 0.11 New 27 +27
United for Gran Canaria (Unidos)11 20,494 0.09 +0.03 12 +8
Union for Leganés (ULEG) 19,463 0.09 +0.03 6 +2
Blank Seats (EB) 17,783 0.08 New 1 +1
Commitment to Galicia–Transparent Councils (CxG–CCTT) 17,592 0.08 New 41 +41
Leonese People's Union (UPL) 16,946 0.08 –0.01 139 +4
Citizen Movement of Cartagena (MCC) 14,545 0.06 New 5 +5
Ourensan Democracy (DO) 14,518 0.06 +0.04 12 +10
Galician Land (TeGa) 14,279 0.06 ±0.00 29 +6
Extremadurans (eX)12 14,168 0.06 +0.05 94 +77
Costa del Sol Can... Tic Tac (CSSPTT) 14,077 0.06 New 12 +12
Neighbors' Alternative (AV) 13,885 0.06 +0.02 18 +7
Communist Party of the Peoples of Spain (PCPE) 12,807 0.06 +0.01 2 +1
Spain 2000 (E–2000) 12,310 0.05 –0.01 6 +1
Independent Citizens' Union (UCIN)13 12,042 0.05 +0.02 50 +17
Let's Change Between All (CET) 11,187 0.05 New 14 +14
Yes We Can (SSP) 11,152 0.05 New 16 +16
The Greens–Green Group (LV–GV) 11,145 0.05 ±0.00 0 –4
Roque Aguayro (RA) 10,744 0.05 +0.01 17 +3
Riojan Party (PR+) 9,704 0.04 ±0.00 61 +5
Rivas Can (Rivas Puede) 9,513 0.04 New 6 +6
Move Parla (Mover Parla) 9,131 0.04 New 6 +6
Party for Freedom–With Clean Hands (PxL) 8,887 0.04 New 4 +4
Coalition for Melilla (CpM) 8,445 0.04 +0.01 7 +1
Castilian PartyCommoners' Land (PCAS–TC) 8,430 0.04 –0.10 75 –120
Cordobese Union (UCOR) 8,227 0.04 –0.07 1 –4
Catalan Solidarity for Independence (SI) 8,075 0.04 –0.10 18 –30
We Are Coslada (Somos Coslada) 8,009 0.04 New 5 +5
Coalition for El Bierzo (CB)14 7,846 0.04 +0.03 38 +34
Left Movement (MES) 7,687 0.03 New 32 +32
Bierzo Electors' Social Unity (USE Bierzo) 6,013 0.03 New 5 +5
The Greens of the Valencian Country (EVPV)15 5,241 0.02 –0.03 5 +5
Others 1,248,798 5.58 5,314 +495
Blank ballots 370,766 1.66 –0.93
Total 22,395,963 100.00 67,515 –715
Valid votes 22,395,963 98.46 +0.15
Invalid votes 350,526 1.54 –0.15
Votes cast / turnout 22,746,489 64.81 –1.36
Abstentions 12,348,475 35.19 +1.36
Registered voters 35,094,964
Sources[13][14]
Popular vote
PP
27.05%
PSOE
25.02%
Podemos
7.54%
C's
6.55%
IU
6.46%
CiU
3.00%
ERC–AM
2.29%
Compromís
1.71%
EAJ/PNV
1.61%
EH Bildu
1.38%
UPyD
1.04%
CUP–PA
0.93%
BNG
0.85%
CCPNC
0.70%
PA
0.67%
Ganemos
0.66%
Others
10.89%
Blank ballots
1.66%

City control[edit]

The following table lists party control in provincial capitals, as well as in municipalities above or around 75,000.[15] Gains for a party are highlighted in that party's colour.

Municipality Population Previous control New control
A Coruña 244,810 People's Party (PP) Podemos (Marea)
Albacete 172,426 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Alcalá de Guadaíra 75,080 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Alcalá de Henares 200,768 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Alcobendas 112,188 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Alcorcón 170,336 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Algeciras 120,601 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Alicante 332,067 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) (PP in 2018)
Almería 193,351 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Arona 79,928 Canarian Coalition (CCa) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Ávila 58,358 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Avilés 81,659 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Badajoz 149,946 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Badalona 217,210 People's Party (PP) Podemos (Guanyem Badalona en Comú) (PSC–PSOE in 2018)
Barakaldo 100,080 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV)
Barcelona 1,602,386 Convergence and Union (CiU) Podemos (BComú)
Bilbao 346,574 Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV)
Burgos 177,100 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Cáceres 95,814 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Cádiz 118,919 People's Party (PP) Podemos (PCSSP)
Cartagena 216,451 People's Party (PP) Citizen Movement of Cartagena (MCC)
Castellón de la Plana 173,841 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Chiclana de la Frontera 82,645 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Ciudad Real 74,054 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Córdoba 326,609 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Cornellà de Llobregat 86,234 Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE) Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE)
Coslada 88,847 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Cuenca 55,102 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) People's Party (PP)
Dos Hermanas 131,855 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
El Ejido 84,144 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
El Puerto de Santa María 88,184 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Elche 228,647 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Ferrol 70,389 People's Party (PP) United Left (FeC)
Fuengirola 77,525 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Fuenlabrada 195,864 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Gandía 76,497 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Getafe 173,057 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Getxo 79,544 Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV)
Gijón 275,735 Asturias Forum (FAC) Asturias Forum (FAC)
Girona 97,227 Convergence and Union (CiU) Convergence and Union (CiU)
Granada 234,758 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP) (PSOE in 2016)
Guadalajara 83,633 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Huelva 146,318 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Huesca 52,555 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Jaén 115,395 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Jerez de la Frontera 212,830 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
L'Hospitalet de Llobregat 253,518 Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE) Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE)
Las Palmas 379,766 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Las Rozas de Madrid 92,784 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Leganés 186,696 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
León 127,817 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Lleida 139,176 Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE) Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE)
Logroño 151,962 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Lorca 91,759 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Lugo 98,560 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Madrid 3,165,235 People's Party (PP) Podemos (Ahora Madrid)
Málaga 566,913 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Manresa 75,297 Convergence and Union (CiU) Convergence and Union (CiU)
Marbella 139,537 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) (PP in 2017)
Mataró 124,280 Convergence and Union (CiU) Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE)
Mijas 79,483 People's Party (PP) Citizens–Party of the Citizenry (C's)
Móstoles 205,712 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Murcia 439,712 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Orihuela 83,417 The Greens (LV) People's Party (PP)
Ourense 106,905 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) People's Party (PP)
Oviedo 223,765 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Palencia 79,595 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Palma 400,578 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) (Més in 2017)
Pamplona 196,166 Navarrese People's Union (UPN) Basque Country Unite (EH Bildu)
Parla 125,323 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) People's Party (PP)
Pontevedra 82,946 Galician Nationalist Bloc (BNG) Galician Nationalist Bloc (BNG)
Pozuelo de Alarcón 84,360 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Reus 104,962 Convergence and Union (CiU) Convergence and Union (CiU)
Rivas-Vaciamadrid 80,483 United Left (IU) United Left (IU)
Roquetas de Mar 91,682 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Rubí 74,353 Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE) Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE)
Sabadell 207,444 Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE) Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) (CUP in 2017)
Salamanca 146,438 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
San Cristóbal de La Laguna 152,843 Canarian Coalition (CCa) Canarian Coalition (CCa)
San Fernando 95,949 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
San Sebastián 186,126 Basque Country Unite (EH Bildu) Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV)
San Sebastián de los Reyes 83,329 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Sant Boi de Llobregat 83,107 Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE) Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE)
Sant Cugat del Vallès 87,118 Convergence and Union (CiU) Convergence and Union (CiU)
Santa Coloma de Gramenet 118,738 Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE) Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE)
Santa Cruz de Tenerife 203,811 Canarian Coalition (CCa) Canarian Coalition (CCa)
Santander 175,736 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Santiago de Compostela 95,800 People's Party (PP) Podemos (CA)
Segovia 52,728 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Seville 693,878 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Soria 39,168 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Talavera de la Reina 84,119 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Tarragona 132,199 Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE) Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE)
Telde 102,078 People's Party (PP) New Canaries (NCa)
Terrassa 215,517 Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE) Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC–PSOE)
Teruel 35,675 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Toledo 83,459 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Torrejón de Ardoz 126,878 People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Torrent 80,551 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Torrevieja 91,415 People's Party (PP) The Greens (LV)
Valencia 786,424 People's Party (PP) Commitment Coalition (Compromís)
Valladolid 303,905 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Vélez-Málaga 78,166 People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Vigo 294,997 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Vitoria-Gasteiz 242,082 People's Party (PP) Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV)
Zamora 63,831 People's Party (PP) United Left (IU)
Zaragoza 666,058 Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Podemos (ZGZ)

Provincial deputations[edit]

Summary[edit]

Provincial deputy share for different parties in the elections.

  PP (39.90%)
  PSOEPSC (37.60%)
  CiU (4.90%)
  IUICV–EUiAAnova (4.04%)
  C's (3.46%)
  ERC (3.08%)
  Podemos (2.21%)
  BNG (1.15%)
  Compromís (1.06%)
  PAR (0.87%)
  CUP–PA (0.58%)
  Other (1.15%)
Summary of the 24 May 2015 provincial deputations election results
Parties and coalitions Seats
Total +/−
People's Party (PP) 415 –93
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 391 –4
Convergence and Union (CiU) 51 –12
United Left (IU) 42 +15
Citizens–Party of the Citizenry (C's) 36 +36
Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) 32 +21
We Can and allies (Podemos) 23 +23
Galician Nationalist Bloc (BNG) 12 –1
Commitment Coalition (Compromís) 11 +9
Aragonese Party (PAR) 9 –1
Popular Unity Candidacy–Active People (CUP–PA) 6 +6
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) 2 ±0
Aragonese Union (CHA) 2 +1
Ourensan Democracy (DO) 2 +2
Andalusian Party (PA) 1 –1
Participatory Democracy (Participa) 1 +1
Leonese People's Union (UPL) 1 ±0
Coalition for El Bierzo (CB) 1 +1
Others 2 –3
Total 1,040 ±0
Sources[1]

Deputation control[edit]

The following table lists party control in provincial deputations.[1] Gains for a party are highlighted in that party's colour.

Province Previous control New control
A Coruña People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Albacete People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Alicante People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Almería People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Ávila People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Badajoz Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Barcelona Convergence and Union (CiU) Convergence and Union (CiU)
Burgos People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Cáceres People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Cádiz People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Castellón People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Ciudad Real Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Córdoba People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Cuenca People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Girona Convergence and Union (CiU) Convergence and Union (CiU)
Granada People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Guadalajara People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Huelva Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Huesca Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Jaén Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
León People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Lleida Convergence and Union (CiU) Convergence and Union (CiU)
Lugo Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) People's Party (PP)
Málaga People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Ourense People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Palencia People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Pontevedra People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Salamanca People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Segovia People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Seville Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Soria People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Tarragona Convergence and Union (CiU) Convergence and Union (CiU)
Teruel People's Party (PP) Aragonese Party (PAR)
Toledo People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Valencia People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)
Valladolid People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Zamora People's Party (PP) People's Party (PP)
Zaragoza People's Party (PP) Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Provincial deputation elections since 1979" (in Spanish). historiaelectoral.com. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  2. ^ "Iglesias eludes the locals in order to arrive with strength to the general election" (in Spanish). El Mundo. 22 September 2014.
  3. ^ "United Left plans to join the 'Ganemos'" (in Spanish). El Mundo. 17 August 2014.
  4. ^ "Somos IU, against joining the Ganemos" (in Spanish). El País. 6 November 2014.
  5. ^ "ICV, EUiA, Podemos, Guanyem and Procés Constituent work towards a joint list" (in Spanish). Público. 25 November 2014.
  6. ^ "Equo joints the 'Ganemos' platforms for the locals" (in Spanish). El País. 3 November 2014.
  7. ^ "We are part of Ganemos Madrid" (in Spanish). Porunmundomasjusto.es. 3 November 2014. Archived from the original on 22 May 2015. Retrieved 8 June 2015.
  8. ^ "We are part of Ganemos Madrid" (in Spanish). La Voz de Galicia. 23 April 2015.
  9. ^ "Guanyem, ICV-EUiA and Podemos agree on their alliance in Barcelona" (in Spanish). El País. 20 January 2015.
  10. ^ a b c "General Electoral System Organic Law of 1985". Organic Law No. 5 of 19 June 1985. Official State Gazette (in Spanish). Retrieved 28 December 2016.
  11. ^ a b c "Representation of the people Institutional Act". juntaelectoralcentral.es. Central Electoral Commission. Retrieved 16 June 2017.
  12. ^ "Regulation of the Basis of Local Regimes Law of 1985". Law No. 7 of 2 April 1985. Official State Gazette (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 August 2017.
  13. ^ "Electoral Results Consultation. Municipal. May 2015. National totals". infoelectoral.mir.es (in Spanish). Ministry of the Interior. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  14. ^ "Municipal elections (overall results 2015)" (in Spanish). historiaelectoral.com. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  15. ^ "Municipal elections (city majors by party)". historiaelectoral.com (in Spanish). Historia Electoral. Retrieved 24 February 2018.