Spath

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For other uses, see Spath (disambiguation).
Spath
Spath is located in Staffordshire
Spath
Spath
Spath shown within Staffordshire
OS grid reference SK085352
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town UTTOXETER
Postcode district ST14 5
Dialling code 01889
Police Staffordshire
Fire Staffordshire
Ambulance West Midlands
EU Parliament West Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Staffordshire
52°54′54″N 1°52′23″W / 52.915°N 1.873°W / 52.915; -1.873Coordinates: 52°54′54″N 1°52′23″W / 52.915°N 1.873°W / 52.915; -1.873

Spath, is a small village north of Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, England. For population details as taken at the 2011 census see Uttoxeter Rural.

Spath is on the River Tean and is divided from Uttoxeter by the A50 road.

In UK railway history, Spath is notable as the site of the first automatic (i.e. train-operated) level crossing in the United Kingdom (AHBC - Automatic Half Barrier Crossing), which came into operation on 5 February 1961.[1] The railway has now been dismantled, the road which crossed it via the automatic crossing is now gated and only leads to a farm and there is no remaining visible sign of the crossing. More information about the development of the automatic barriers at Spath crossing can be found at the Derby Signalling web site.

Spath was the original home of Stevensons of Uttoxeter, a bus company which celebrated its 80th Anniversary in 2007.

Spath is sometimes used as slang, or shorthand, for "sociopath" or "psychopath".

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "News Summary: Automatic 'Gates'". Practical Motorist. 7 (81): 957. May 1961. Britain's first automatically operated level crossing barriers are now in operation at Spath Level Crossing near Uttoxeter. The barriers, electronically operated by an approaching train, consist of poles fixed each side of the road only, and are conspicuously marked with red and white bands. Additional warning is given by flashing red lights & gongs.  See also unnamed 1961 publication quoted at "First BR Automatic Level Crossing Barriers". Rail Blue.