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  • René Descartes (/ˈdeɪˌkɑːrt/; French: [ʁəne dekaʁt]; Latinized: Renatus Cartesius; adjectival form: "Cartesian"; 31 March 1596 – 11 February 1650) was
    90 KB (10,638 words) - 20:59, 19 February 2018
  • Lycée Descartes or Lycée français René-Descartes (LFRD) may refer to: Schools in France: Lycée Descartes in Montigny le Bretonneux, Yvelines, Paris metropolitan
    1 KB (98 words) - 06:02, 16 November 2016
  • Paris Descartes University (French: Université Paris 5 René Descartes), also known as Paris V, is a French public research university located in Paris
    8 KB (713 words) - 08:39, 9 October 2017
  • The Lycée français René Descartes de Phnom Penh is a private French school in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, operated under agreement with the Agence pour l'Enseignement
    3 KB (302 words) - 15:39, 8 September 2017
  • In mathematics, Descartes' rule of signs, first described by René Descartes in his work La Géométrie, is a technique for determining an upper bound on
    7 KB (1,113 words) - 04:24, 5 February 2018
  • Cartesian doubt (category René Descartes)
    methodological skepticism associated with the writings and methodology of René Descartes (1596—1650). Cartesian doubt is also known as Cartesian skepticism,
    8 KB (1,004 words) - 01:51, 30 October 2017
  • Francine Descartes (19 July 1635, Deventer – 7 September 1640, Amersfoort) was René Descartes' daughter. Francine was the daughter of Helena Jans van der
    3 KB (313 words) - 05:55, 5 December 2017
  • Lycée Français René Descartes Kinshasa is a French international school in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It serves maternelle (preschool)
    3 KB (167 words) - 13:40, 9 January 2018
  • Cogito ergo sum (category René Descartes)
    Cogito ergo sum is a Latin philosophical proposition by René Descartes usually translated into English as "I think, therefore I am". The phrase originally
    30 KB (4,118 words) - 18:41, 19 February 2018
  • to three given, mutually tangent circles. The theorem is named after René Descartes, who stated it in 1643. Geometrical problems involving tangent circles
    9 KB (1,336 words) - 00:53, 12 February 2018
  • in the machine" is British philosopher Gilbert Ryle's description of René Descartes' mind-body dualism. The phrase was introduced in Ryle's book The Concept
    9 KB (1,170 words) - 10:28, 20 February 2018
  • La Géométrie (category Works by René Descartes)
    appendix to Discours de la méthode (Discourse on the Method), written by René Descartes. In the Discourse, he presents his method for obtaining clarity on any
    10 KB (1,277 words) - 02:36, 5 January 2018
  • positing that rationality requires emotional input. He argues that René Descartes' "error" was the dualist separation of mind and body, rationality and
    3 KB (258 words) - 05:47, 9 January 2018
  • Evil demon (redirect from Descartes demon)
    in Cartesian philosophy. In his 1641 Meditations on First Philosophy, Descartes imagines that an evil demon, of "utmost power and cunning has employed
    23 KB (3,256 words) - 15:43, 31 December 2017
  • Light (French title: Traité du monde et de la lumière), is a book by René Descartes (1596–1650). Written between 1629 and 1633, it contains a nearly complete
    10 KB (1,502 words) - 13:37, 16 October 2016
  • Wax argument (category René Descartes)
    wax argument or the ball of wax example is a thought experiment that René Descartes created within his Meditations on First Philosophy. He devised it to
    4 KB (608 words) - 17:56, 4 December 2017
  • The Description of the Human Body (category Works by René Descartes)
    corps humain) is an unfinished treatise written in 1647 by René Descartes (1596-1650). Descartes felt knowing oneself was particularly useful. This for him
    2 KB (313 words) - 16:30, 2 September 2017
  • religion at the time. One early contributor was a French philosopher, Rene Descartes. He reinforced an Aristotelian concept explaining the human mind that
    9 KB (1,150 words) - 23:37, 21 October 2017
  • philosophical treatise by René Descartes first published in 1641 (in Latin). The French translation (by the Duke of Luynes with Descartes' supervision) was published
    50 KB (7,242 words) - 14:07, 11 February 2018
  • René Descartes (1596–1650) was a French mathematician and philosopher. Descartes may also refer to: University of Paris V: René Descartes, a university
    1 KB (150 words) - 19:42, 17 February 2017

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