Spencer Ackerman

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Spencer Ackerman
Spencer Ackerman in 2008.jpg
Ackerman at Netroots Nation in 2008[1]
Born (1980-06-01) June 1, 1980 (age 41)
NationalityAmerican
EducationRutgers University (BA)
OccupationJournalist, writer
Years active2002-present
Known forReporting on biased FBI training material, 2013 global surveillance disclosures, and Chicago Police detention practices
Notable work
Reign of Terror
Awards2012 National Magazine Award for Digital Media, 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service
Websitewww.thedailybeast.com/author/spencer-ackerman

Spencer Ackerman is an American journalist and writer. Focusing primarily on national security, he began his career at The New Republic in 2002 before writing for Wired, The Guardian and The Daily Beast.[2][3][4][5]

He won a 2012 National Magazine Award for reporting on biased FBI training materials and a 2014 Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the 2013 global surveillance disclosures.[6][7]

During his career, Ackerman has reported from Afghanistan, Iraq, and Guantanamo Bay.[8][9][10]

Early life and education[edit]

Born to a Jewish family on June 1, 1980, Ackerman graduated from the Bronx High School of Science in 1998 and Rutgers University in 2002 with a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy.[11][12][13][14]

During the 2000 U.S. presidential election, he covered the Bush campaign for Rutgers' student newspaper, The Daily Targum.[15] He earned a 2002 Certificate of Merit from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association in news writing for his coverage of the post election recount in Florida.[16] While attending Rutgers, Ackerman also worked for the New York Press, a now defunct free alternative weekly that covered New York City.[17] Initially hired to manage incoming mail for the listings section, he later became a fact checker and a writer.[18][19][20]

Career[edit]

Following his graduation from Rutgers, Ackerman moved to Washington, D.C. to join The New Republic where he covered national security. In an interview with Columbia Journalism Review, Ackerman said witnessing the September 11 attacks influenced his decision to cover national security, which he viewed as the most important story facing the nation at the time.[21] He worked at The New Republic (TNR) until 2006, when he started a blog titled Too Hot for TNR[22] and was fired over what he described as irreconcilable ideological differences.[23] Franklin Foer, a then-editor at the magazine, said he fired Ackerman for insubordination and disparaging the magazine on his blog.[24][25]

Ackerman next began writing for The American Prospect[26] as well as Talking Points Memo.[27] In a column for The Wall Street Journal, Marie Beaudette named Ackerman as part of a "blogging elite" in Washington, D.C. that took up the practice as a hobby or to launch a career.[28]

While at The American Prospect and Talking Points Memo, Ackerman also contributed to the Washington Monthly on national security.[29]

The Washington Independent and Attackerman[edit]

In December 2007, Ackerman joined The Washington Independent as a senior fellow, where he covered national security and foreign policy.[30][31] He described the publication as taking a new approach in using the internet to continuously develop and update stories while also providing detailed and innovative coverage on select beats.[32]

Shortly after his arrival, he wrote a series on the Bush Administration's torture policy and use of enhanced interrogation tactics, including the detention of Khalid Shaikh Mohammed.[33][34][35][36] In September 2008, he traveled to Afghanistan to embed with the U.S. Army's 1st Cavalry Division.[37] During his embed, Ackerman interviewed several Afghan residents about their security concerns and uncovered corruption within the Afghan police units jointly patrolling with U.S. forces.[38][39]

Throughout 2008, Ackerman authored a blog series on the U.S. military's counterinsurgency strategy in Iraq and Afghanistan.[40][41][42] He explained the debate between Paul Yingling and Gian Gentile, two U.S. Army officers with differing perspectives on military policy in the Global War on Terrorism. Yingling argued the U.S. military must embrace principles of counterinsurgency while Gentile believed the military moved too far in the direction of counterinsurgency while ignoring the limits of U.S. military power.[43] The series also profiled General David Petraeus and then Major General Ray Odierno during the Iraq War troop surge of 2007 as well as several women who attained positions related to counterinsurgency within the Pentagon including Janine Davidson, Sarah Sewall, Michèle Flournoy, and Montgomery McFate.[44][45][46]

Aside from his regular writing for The Washington Independent, Ackerman continued maintaining a personal blog. After ending publication of Too Hot for TNR in April 2008, he started the Attackerman blog at ThinkProgress, which he used to provide additional commentary on national security issues.[47] In June 2008, Ackerman moved the blog to Firedoglake.[48][49]

In August 2009, Politico reported Ackerman was one of numerous reporters profiled by the Rendon Group, a public relations firm hired by the Pentagon to vet journalists requesting embeds with U.S. forces in Iraq.[50] The requests were granted based on whether their coverage of the conflict portrayed the U.S. military in a positive light.[51][52] While several journalists received copies of their vetting reports, Rendon did not provide Ackerman with their report on him.[53] The revelations prompted the military to end their contract with the firm.[54]

Towards the end of his tenure, he toured the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, in April 2010, for the second time in his career.[55] His coverage also included the detention and pretrial proceedings of Omar Khadr, a Canadian citizen captured by U.S. forces in Afghanistan.[56][57]

Wired[edit]

Ackerman joined Wired magazine's Danger Room in June 2010, a blog dedicated to covering national security.[58] Then editor, Noah Shachtman, described the blog as a "less political" and "more geeky" place compared to Ackerman's previous publications.[59] Within months of his arrival, Ackerman covered the numerous WikiLeaks disclosures on Afghanistan, Iraq, and the diplomatic cables.[60][61][62][63] Towards the end of August 2010, he traveled to Afghanistan, embedding with U.S. troops and interviewing David Petraeus.[64][65][66]

In July 2010, The Daily Caller reported on Ackerman's membership in JournoList, a private Google Groups forum for discussing politics and the news media created by Ezra Klein in February 2007.[67] Coverage of the revelations noted Ackerman's comments on conservative rhetoric surrounding the Jeremiah Wright controversy, which he made while writing for The Washington Independent.[68] In a column for The Wall Street Journal, James Taranto, criticized Ackerman for "privately strategizing about how to suppress the news."[69] Ackerman faced additional criticism from Ed Morrissey, Andrew Breitbart, Daniel Foster, Matt Welch, Andrew Sullivan, and Sydney Smith.[70][71][72][73][74][75] Others such as Steve Krakauer of Mediaite and Jonathan Chait of The New Republic questioned whether the forum represented a controversy.[76][77] Chait also published a specific response to Sullivan's claims, noting that conservative bloggers also participate in similar forums.[78] A spokesperson for Wired defended Ackerman, adding the publication was aware of his political views.[79]

Due to his blog's affiliation with Firedoglake, Ackerman experienced difficulties obtaining permanent press credentials from the Congressional Press Gallery.[80] He left Firedoglake in December 2010 to independently host the Attackerman blog on Typepad, before transitioning a custom built website, where he would continue posting until April 2013.[81][82][83]

Following a FOIA request in 2011, Ackerman wrote a series of stories that exposed Islamophobic material used to train recruits in counterterrorism at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia.[84] His initial reporting revealed bias in the FBI's guides on Islam before exposing additional materials in the agency's library.[85][86] Following the revelations, the FBI launched an investigation and turned to the U.S. Army's Combating Terrorism Center at West Point before eventually purging the materials.[87][88][89] The series earned Ackerman a 2012 National Magazine Award for Digital Media.[90]

Aside from covering national security, Ackerman wrote about developments in military technology. In 2012, he toured the Autonomous Systems Research Lab at the United States Naval Research Laboratory in Washington D.C., covering the development of Octavia, a robot designed to carry out human tasks on naval vessels.[91] He also covered the experimentation of the U.S. Army's Active Denial System, a device that projects a heat ray for crowd control.[92][93] The following year, Ackerman traveled on the U.S.S. George H.W. Bush to cover the launch of the X-47B, the first UAV to take-off from an aircraft carrier.[94]

In a January 2012 column for Tablet magazine, Ackerman expressed disagreement with the use of the term "Israel Firster", writing, "if you can’t do it without sounding like Pat Buchanan, who has nothing but antipathy and contempt for Jews, then you’ve lost the debate."[95] Identifying himself as part of the Jewish left, Ackerman noted the term was first used by far-right activist Willis Carto and neo-Nazi David Duke.[96] The Jerusalem Post editorial board and Commentary's then assistant editor, Alana Goodman, came to Ackerman's defense.[97][98] He was criticized by Richard Silverstein in Eurasia Review and Philip Weiss in Mondoweiss.[99][100]

The Guardian[edit]

In June 2013, Ackerman joined The Guardian as a national security editor, initially at their Washington bureau before eventually relocating back to New York.[101] During his onboarding process, Ackerman's job orientation functioned as cover for a briefing on the 2013 Global surveillance disclosures, which the publication had just received from Edward Snowden.[102]

He contributed to several stories on the revelations that culminated in the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service.[103][104] Alongside Glenn Greenwald, Ackerman's reporting showed the National Security Agency's bulk collection programs continued during the first two years of the Obama Administration after being initiated by George W. Bush.[105] In a piece coauthored with James Ball, Ackerman revealed how loopholes allowed the NSA to legally search for U.S. citizens' email and phone calls without a warrant.[106] As a sole author, he covered the NSA's use of contractors and their access to classified information.[107]

Aside from the Pulitzer, Ackerman, Greenwald, Ball, as well as Ewen MacAskill, Laura Poitras, Dominic Rushe, and Julian Borger, won the Investigative Reporters and Editors medal for investigative journalism.[108] Additionally, Greenwald, Poitras, MacAskill, Ball, and Ackerman also went on to win the 2014 Scripps Howard Foundation Roy W. Howard Award for Public Service Reporting.[109]

Starting in 2015, Ackerman attached a statement to his email signature, warning that unilateral declarations of anonymity from potential sources would not be honored.[110] In an interview with CNN's Brian Stelter on Reliable Sources, Ackerman explained that a reporter should only grant anonymity following a discussion with the source regarding the reasons for anonymity.[111]

The Daily Beast[edit]

Ackerman joined The Daily Beast as a senior national security correspondent in May 2017, reuniting with his former editor from Wired, Noah Shachtman.[112] In addition to his usual beat, Ackerman's coverage also included homeland security, counterterrorism, and intelligence.[113] Speaking with James Warren of the Poynter Institute, Ackerman explained that he and Shachtman aim to break news rather than rewrite stories published by other news sources.[114]

On April 30, 2021, he announced his departure and became a contributing editor for the publication.[115]

Awards[edit]

The Guardian

Wired

The Daily Targum

Podcasts[edit]

In 2019, Ackerman co-hosted, with Laura Hudson, the “Citadel Dropouts,” a Wired podcast about the final season of Game of Thrones.[121] Since 2018, he has appeared on the Graphic Policy podcast, discussing comics, films, and miniseries.[122][123][124][125][126]

Works[edit]

  • Ackerman, Spencer (August 10, 2021), Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump, Viking, ISBN 9781984879776
  • Nance, Malcolm; Ackerman, Spencer (foreword) (October 10, 2016), The Plot to Hack America: How Putin's Cyberspies and WikiLeaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election, Skyhorse Publishing, p. 216, ISBN 9781510723320

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Iraq in Strategic Context". The Austin Chronicle. July 11, 2008. Retrieved June 11, 2021. While the media focuses on "the surge," this panel takes a holistic look at Iraq in geopolitical terms for the Middle East, the U.S., and the world. Young turks of the blogosphere Matt Yglesias and Spencer Ackerman are joined by the National Security Network's Ilan Goldenberg and A.J. Rossmiller.
  2. ^ "Spencer Ackerman". The New Republic. Archived from the original on October 18, 2006. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  3. ^ "Spencer Ackerman". Wired. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  4. ^ "Spencer Ackerman". The Guardian. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  5. ^ "Spencer Ackerman". The Daily Beast. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  6. ^ "National Magazine Awards for Digital Media 2012 Winners Announced". American Society of Magazine Editors. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
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  8. ^ Ackerman, Spencer. "Weapons Cache Hunting". The Washington Independent. Zormat, Afghanistan. Archived from the original on September 18, 2008. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  9. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (March 9, 2007). "Calm before the..." The American Prospect. Baghdad, Iraq. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  10. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (April 14, 2014). "Guantánamo hearings halted amid accusations of FBI spying on legal team". The Guardian. Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  11. ^ @attackerman (November 19, 2018). "I was born in 1980, so I technically count too..." (Tweet). Archived from the original on May 17, 2021 – via Twitter.
  12. ^ Lippman, Daniel (June 1, 2018). "BIRTHDAY OF THE DAY: Spencer Ackerman, national security reporter at the Daily Beast". Politico. Washington, D.C. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  13. ^ "Contributors". Shadowproof. Retrieved May 31, 2021. A Brooklyn native, he graduated from Rutgers University in 2002 with a BA in philosophy
  14. ^ Steve Scully and Spencer Ackerman (July 9, 2004). War on Terror (video). Washington, D.C.: C-SPAN. Event occurs at 27:10. Retrieved May 31, 2021. SCULLY:What did you study at Rutgers? ACKERMAN:I was a philosophy student at Rutgers.
  15. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (December 12, 2000). "Too Close To Call: Bush left waiting to declare his victory". The Daily Targum. Austin, Texas. Archived from the original on December 12, 2000. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  16. ^ "2002 - Awards For Student Work Gold Circle Awards - Collegiate Recipients". Columbia University in the City of New York. Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Retrieved May 31, 2021. CM. Spencer Ackerman, "Too Close To Call," The Daily Targum, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
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  18. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (January 25, 2010). "Sam Sifton". Shadowproof. Retrieved May 31, 2021. My first job in journalism was opening mail for the listings section of the immortal Manhattan weekly New York Press when I was 19. By the grace of Russ Smith, Lisa Kearns, John Strausbaugh, Lisa LeeKing and especially Andrey Slivka and Daria Vaisman, I eventually graduated to factchecker and got to write for the paper.
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  20. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (October 31, 2001). "The Block Is Hot". New York Press. New York, New York. Archived from the original on November 6, 2001. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  21. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (August 10, 2009). "Q & A: Spencer Ackerman Part One". Columbia Journalism Review (Interview). Interviewed by Greg Marx. New York, New York. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
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  24. ^ Hendler, Clint. "How Spencer Ackerman got Too Hot for TNR". The New York Review of Magazines. Retrieved May 31, 2021. The New Republic has never been a particularly modest publication; in the mid 90s it claimed to be the “in-flight magazine of Air Force One.” The Libby indictment gave rise to a new boast: “When The New Republic Makes History, Are You There?” Ackerman wouldn’t be there much longer. Less than a year later, his boss Franklin Foer called and asked him to come in for a talk. Ackerman was working from home that day, maintaining the magazine’s baseball playoffs blog and posting a bit on Too Hot for TNR, his personal blog which he had just set up that weekend. Ackerman says his relationship with Foer had begun to deteriorate eight months before, in March of 2006, when Foer, who was thirty-one at the time, was given the magazine’s top job by Martin Peretz, TNR’s then owner and editor-in-chief.“As I was on the bus on the way down, I thought, ‘This is it. I’m probably going to be fired.’ I’d thought that before, but this felt different,” says Ackerman. This was different. Foer sat Ackerman down and told him that his behavior—both in the office and on his blog—had been unacceptable. His career at the magazine was over.
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  34. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (June 18, 2008). "Roadmap to Torture". The Washington Independent. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on July 17, 2008. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  35. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (June 19, 2008). "Long-term Harm From U.S. Torture". The Washington Independent. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on July 6, 2008. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
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  37. ^ Ackerman, Spencer. "Weapons Cache Hunting". The Washington Independent. Zormat, Afghanistan. Archived from the original on September 18, 2008. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  38. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (September 15, 2008). "Afghans Talk Security Troubles". The Washington Independent. Zormat, Afghanistan. Archived from the original on September 18, 2008. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
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  40. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (July 27, 2008). "Series: The Rise of the Counterinsurgents". The Washington Independent. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on June 18, 2009. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  41. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (September 29, 2008). "Military Embraces Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan". The Washington Independent. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 8, 2009. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  42. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (May 2, 2008). "The Insurgent as Counterinsurgent". The Washington Independent. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on April 30, 2009. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  43. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (March 6, 2008). "The Colonels and 'The Matrix'". The Washington Independent. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on April 30, 2008. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
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  52. ^ Shane III, Leo (August 29, 2009). "Army used profiles to reject reporters". Stars and Stripes. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on September 2, 2009. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  53. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (August 28, 2009). "I Want My Rendon Group Profile!". The Washington Independent. Archived from the original on December 1, 2009. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  54. ^ Baron, Kevin (August 31, 2019). "Military terminates Rendon contract". Stars and Stripes. Arlington, Virginia. Archived from the original on September 2, 2009. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  55. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (April 27, 2010). "A Photographic Tour of Guantanamo Bay". The Washington Independent. Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Archived from the original on April 30, 2010. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  56. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (May 7, 2010). "GTMO Postscript: Prosecutor Goes After Defense, Press". The Washington Independent. Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Archived from the original on May 13, 2010. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  57. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (May 11, 2010). "Covering A Terrorism Hearing At Guantanamo Bay". Fresh Air (Interview). Interviewed by Terry Gross. National Public Radio. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
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  80. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (December 29, 2010). "A Bittersweet Goodbye Post". Attackerman. Firedoglake. Archived from the original on December 31, 2010. Retrieved May 31, 2021. My departure is pretty mundane: the congressional press galleries are wary of giving me permanent credentials while I’m affiliated here, and I don’t want to impede any of my reporting responsibilities at my day job with Wired‘s Danger Room.
  81. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (December 29, 2010). "Welcome to Attackerman 3.0". Attackerman. Archived from the original on December 31, 2010. Retrieved May 31, 2021. So: here's the rollout of the next generation of Attackerman. We're going back to a stripped-down format, less formal, less torrid.
  82. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (December 2, 2011). "Die, Die, Die My Darling, Don't Utter A Single Word". Attackerman. Archived from the original on December 19, 2011. Retrieved May 31, 2021. This blog must die for Attackerman to live. And as of this post, that's exactly what's happening. Starting Monday, this blog will be located -- finally -- at Attackerman.com.
  83. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (April 22, 2013). "Attackerman". Attackerman. Archived from the original on October 26, 2014. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  84. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (September 14, 2011). "FBI Teaches Agents: 'Mainstream' Muslims Are 'Violent, Radical'". Wired. Washington, D.C. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  85. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (July 27, 2011). "FBI 'Islam 101' Guide Depicted Muslims as 7th-Century Simpletons". Wired. Washington, D.C. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  86. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (September 23, 2011). "New Evidence of Anti-Islam Bias Underscores Deep Challenges for FBI's Reform Pledge". Wired. Washington, D.C. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  87. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (November 3, 2011). "FBI Calls In The Army To Fix Its Counterterrorism Training". Wired. Washington, D.C. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  88. ^ Ackerman, Spencer; Shachtman, Noah (June 20, 2012). "'Institutional Failures' Led Military to Teach War on Islam". Washington, D.C. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  89. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (February 12, 2012). "FBI Purges Hundreds of Terrorism Documents in Islamophobia Probe". Wired. Washington, D.C. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  90. ^ "National Magazine Awards for Digital Media 2012 Winners Announced". American Society of Magazine Editors. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  91. ^ Spencer Ackerman (April 10, 2012). Danger Room Video Ops: The Navy's New Robot Playground. YouTube: Wired.com. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  92. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (March 12, 2012). "Video: I Got Blasted by the Pentagon's Pain Ray -- Twice". Wired. Quantico, Virginia. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  93. ^ Spencer Ackerman (March 13, 2012). Danger Room Video Ops: Spencer Ackerman Zapped by 'Pain Ray'. YouTube: Wired.com. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  94. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (May 14, 2013). "Navy's Historic Drone Launch From an Aircraft Carrier Has an Asterisk". Wired. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  95. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (January 27, 2012). "Sounding Off". Tablet. Retrieved May 31, 2021. But if you can’t do it without sounding like Pat Buchanan, who has nothing but antipathy and contempt for Jews, then you’ve lost the debate.
  96. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (January 27, 2012). "Sounding Off". Tablet. Retrieved May 31, 2021. “Israel Firster” has a nasty anti-Semitic pedigree, one that many Jews will intuitively understand without knowing its specific history. It turns out white supremacist Willis Carto was reportedly the first to use it, and David Duke popularized it through his propaganda network...Throughout my career, I’ve been associated with the Jewish left—I was to the left of the New Republic staff when I worked there, moved on to Talking Points Memo, hosted my blog at Firedoglake for years, and so on. I’ve criticized the American Jewish right’s myopic, destructive, tribal conception of what it means to love Israel.
  97. ^ "Debunking the 'Israel-firster' slur". The Jerusalem Post. January 30, 2012. Retrieved May 31, 2021. On the Jewish website Tablet, left-wing journalist Spencer Ackerman, who said he has criticized the American Jewish Right’s “myopic, destructive, tribal conception of what it means to love Israel,” nevertheless admits that by using the term “Israel-firster” one loses the debate by revealing one’s “antipathy and contempt for Jews.” More profoundly, Ackerman pointed out that many on the Left who are fond of the “Israel-firster” smear and categorically deny its anti-Semitic undertone are “very good at hearing and analyzing dog-whistles when they’re used to dehumanize Arabs and Muslims.”
  98. ^ Goodman, Alana (January 27, 2012). "Spencer Ackerman: Progressives Need to Reject "Israel-Firster" Comments". Commentary. Retrieved May 31, 2021. Spencer’s column is important because it draws a line on the left between acceptable discourse – which includes plenty of discourse that may be stupid or inaccurate – and vulgar anti-Semitic fallacies that should be repudiated by all respectable progressive thinkers and writers. Every once in awhile, these lines need to be drawn.
  99. ^ Silverstein, Richard (January 29, 2012). "What Spencer Ackerman Doesn't Know About The Pro-Israel Crowd – OpEd". Eurasia Review. Retrieved May 31, 2021. But no, he has it precisely wrong when he attempts to lay out the “right” and “wrong” way for Jews to argue. I would concede that there are certain terms that are not just offensive, but impermissible in such arguments. Scatology, threats of violence, Nazi references–all are treif whether coming from the left or right. And I’ve censored, moderated and banned comments here on both sides of this debate.
  100. ^ Weiss, Philip (February 7, 2012). "Leading Zionist historian was first to say 'Israel Firster'– in 1960". Mondoweiss. Retrieved May 31, 2021. Well Ackerman is wrong. The term Israel Firster was used by a Zionist before it was used by white supremacists. I just got a hold of the American Jewish Committee’s Yearbook for 1961. It cites the use of the term “Israel Firster” by a legendary Zionist, the late Abram Leon Sachar, the leading American historian of Jews and president of Brandeis when he said it.
  101. ^ Kolker, Gennady (May 8, 2013). "Spencer Ackerman joins the Guardian as National Security Editor" (Press release). New York, New York: The Guardian.
  102. ^ Dan O'Mahony (October 11, 2020). "Spencer Ackerman". Dan O Says So (Podcast). Anchor. Event occurs at 24:56. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  103. ^ "The Guardian US". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  104. ^ Pilkington, Ed (April 14, 2014). "Guardian and Washington Post win Pulitzer prize for NSA revelations". The Guardian. Retrieved June 26, 2017. Others on the team of journalists included Spencer Ackerman, James Ball, David Blishen, Gabriel Dance, Julian Borger, Nick Davies, David Leigh and Dominic Rushe. In Australia the editor was Katharine Viner and the reporter Lenore Taylor.
  105. ^ Greenwald, Glenn; Ackerman, Spencer (June 27, 2013). "NSA collected US email records in bulk for more than two years under Obama". The Guardian. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  106. ^ Ball, James; Ackerman, Spencer (August 9, 2013). "NSA loophole allows warrantless search for US citizens' emails and phone calls". The Guardian. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  107. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (June 10, 2013). "Snowden leak shines light on US intelligence agencies' use of contractors". The Guardian. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  108. ^ "The IRE Journal" (PDF). Investigative Reporters and Editors. Missouri School of Journalism. Spring 2014. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  109. ^ Micheli, Carolyn (March 20, 2014). "Scripps Howard Awards Honor Best Journalism in the Nation in 2013" (Press release). Cincinnati, Ohio: Scripps Howard Foundation. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  110. ^ @attackerman (June 3, 2015). "Many people have driven me to this, and they know who they are. My new email signature file:" (Tweet). Archived from the original on February 18, 2021 – via Twitter.
  111. ^ Ackerman, Spencer (June 6, 2015). "Reporter's war on off-the-record comments". Reliable Sources (Interview). Interviewed by Brian Stelter. CNN. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  112. ^ Stelter, Brian (May 7, 2017). "Spencer Ackerman joining The Daily Beast". cnn.com. Reliable Sources. Retrieved June 1, 2017. Spencer Ackerman, who turned heads when he left Guardian US last week, is moving over to The Daily Beast. He'll be senior national security correspondent for the news organization... covering homeland security, counterterrorism, intel and more... and reuniting with his former colleague Noah Shachtman, who's now the Beast's exec editor. Ackerman says via email: 'The Daily Beast is the place to do the kind of journalism that matters most right now ...'
  113. ^ Pompeo, Joe (May 9, 2017). "Now we know who Spencer Ackerman left The Guardian for". Politico. Retrieved June 1, 2017. The Daily Beast as a senior national security correspondent, 'covering homeland security, counterterrorism, intel and more... and reuniting with his former colleague Noah Shachtman, who's now the Beast's exec editor,' CNN's Brian Stelter reported last night
  114. ^ Shachtman, Noah; Ackerman, Spencer; Woodruff, Betsy (December 11, 2017). "How the Daily Beast breaks big Trump-Russia stories". Poynter (Interview). Interviewed by James Warren. Retrieved May 31, 2021. Spencer Ackerman: One other point. Unlike a lot of news organizations, there is an explicit mandate from Noah and (editor-in-chief) John Avlon that we are not in commodity news business. We have to break news. I am not in a position where, like at a lot of other places, I have to rewrite other peoples' stories. It's a seemingly trivial observation but has tremendous amount of impact.
  115. ^ @attackerman (April 30, 2021). "Getting this out of the way: today was my last day on staff at @thedailybeast. You'll still see me write there - I just filed a piece that will run Monday - but I'm going to be doing some other things I'll announce soon, both journalistic and otherwise" (Tweet). Archived from the original on April 30, 2021 – via Twitter.
  116. ^ "The Guardian US". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  117. ^ "The IRE Journal" (PDF). Investigative Reporters and Editors. Missouri School of Journalism. Spring 2014. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  118. ^ Micheli, Carolyn (March 20, 2014). "Scripps Howard Awards Honor Best Journalism in the Nation in 2013" (Press release). Cincinnati, Ohio: Scripps Howard Foundation. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  119. ^ "National Magazine Awards for Digital Media 2012 Winners Announced". American Society of Magazine Editors. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  120. ^ "2002 - Awards For Student Work Gold Circle Awards - Collegiate Recipients". Columbia University in the City of New York. Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Retrieved May 31, 2021. CM. Spencer Ackerman, "Too Close To Call," The Daily Targum, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
  121. ^ "Podcast: Citadel Dropouts". The Daily Beast. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  122. ^ Elana Levin (April 14, 2018). "Church of Priest: A Roundtable Discussion of DC Comics' Deathstroke". YouTube (Podcast). Graphic Policy. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  123. ^ Elana Levin (November 25, 2018). "Stan Lee: Politics and Business With Spencer Ackerman". YouTube (Podcast). Graphic Policy. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  124. ^ Elana Levin (December 18, 2018). "Daredevil Season 3 with Senior National Security Correspondent Spencer Ackerman". YouTube (Podcast). Graphic Policy. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  125. ^ Elana Levin (January 27, 2020). "Jamelle Bouie, Spencer Ackerman: The X-Men at Davos, HoxPox & Dawn of X". YouTube (Podcast). Graphic Policy. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  126. ^ Elana Levin (May 8, 2021). "The Falcon and the Winter Soldier with Spencer Ackerman and Brandon Wilson". YouTube (Podcast). Graphic Policy. Retrieved May 31, 2021.

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