Sphinx pinastri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Pine hawk-moth
Sphinx pinastri01.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Sphingidae
Genus: Sphinx
Species: S. pinastri
Binomial name
Sphinx pinastri
Linnaeus, 1758[1]
Synonyms
  • Hyloicus pinastri
  • Hyloicus asiaticus Butler, 1875
  • Sphinx saniptri Strecker, 1876
  • Hyloicus selon de Freina & Witt, 1987
  • Hyloicus pinastri albescens Cockayne, 1926
  • Hyloicus pinastri albicans Austaut, 1907
  • Hyloicus pinastri albicolor Cockayne, 1926
  • Hyloicus pinastri bicolor (Lempke, 1959)
  • Hyloicus pinastri cenisius Jordan, 1931
  • Hyloicus pinastri cingulata (Lempke, 1964)
  • Hyloicus pinastri euxinus Derzhavets, 1979
  • Hyloicus pinastri grisea-distincta Tutt, 1904
  • Hyloicus pinastri grisea-mediopunctata Tutt, 1904
  • Hyloicus pinastri grisea-transversa Tutt, 1904
  • Hyloicus pinastri grisea Tutt, 1904
  • Hyloicus pinastri medialis Jordan, 1931
  • Hyloicus pinastri nigrescens (Lempke, 1959)
  • Hyloicus pinastri rubida Cabeau, 1925
  • Hyloicus pinastri semilugens (Andreas, 1925)
  • Hyloicus pinastri typica-virgata Tutt, 1904
  • Hyloicus pinastri unicolor Tutt, 1904
  • Hyloicus pinastri virgata Tutt, 1904
  • Sphinx pinastri albescens Schnaider, 1950
  • Sphinx pinastri brunnea Spuler, 1903
  • Sphinx pinastri fasciata Lampa, 1885
  • Sphinx pinastri ferrea (Closs, 1920)
  • Sphinx pinastri fuliginosa Lambillion, 1907
  • Sphinx pinastri minor Stephan, 1924
  • Sphinx pinastri stehri Stephan, 1926
  • Sphinx pinastri vittata Closs, 1920

Sphinx pinastri, known as the pine hawk-moth, is a moth of the family Sphingidae. It is found in Palearctic ecozone and sometimes the Nearctic ecozone. This species has been found in Scotland but is usually found in England.[2]

The larvae feed on Scots pine, Swiss pine, Siberian pine and Norway spruce.

Description[edit]

The wings of Sphinx pinastri are gray with black dashes. The wingspan is 2 343 12 inches (70–89 mm).[3] The moth flies from April to August depending on the location.

The back of the thorax is grey with two dark bands around both sides.[4]

Life[edit]

The females lay their eggs in groups of 2 or 3 along pine or spruce needles.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fauna Europaea
  2. ^ The Natural History of British Insects By Edward Donovan (accessed January 12, 2009)
  3. ^ a b Butterflies and Moths of North America (accessed January 12, 2009)
  4. ^ The Naturalist's Library edited by William Jardine (accessed January 12, 2009)

External links[edit]