Spice bag

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Spice bag

A spice bag (or spicy bag, spice box or spicy box; Irish: mála spíosrach[1]) is a fast food dish popular in Dublin, and other parts of Ireland inspired by Asian cuisine.[2] The spice bag consists of deep-fried chips, crispy shredded chicken and/or chicken balls, red and green peppers, sliced chili peppers, fried onions, and a variety of spices.[3][4] It is sometimes accompanied by a tub of curry sauce.[5][6][7][8] Available in Chinese takeaways and chippers since the 2010s, the dish has developed something of a cult following. [9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Táimid chomh gnóthach le gaoth Mhárta- Busy Bees" [We're as common as March winds - Busy Bees]. HomeEconomicsTeacher.com. 9 March 2015. Archived from the original on 20 May 2015. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  2. ^ "Spice bags have found their way on to the menu at a Washington DC restaurant". DailyEdge.ie. 1 December 2017. Retrieved 18 December 2017. 
  3. ^ Cahill, Jack (5 April 2017). "SPICY GOODNESS What is a spice bag, what's in it and how do you make it at home? All you need to know about Ireland's favourite takeway". Irish Sun. Retrieved 13 June 2017. 
  4. ^ Digby, Marie Claire (26 January 2017). "How to make a spice bag at home". Irish Times. Retrieved 13 June 2017. 
  5. ^ "5 essential questions and answers about the spice bag phenomenon". DailyEdge.ie. 23 April 2015. Archived from the original on 29 July 2015. Retrieved 6 February 2016. 
  6. ^ PATTISON, BRYNMOR (21 October 2015). "Spice bag named as Ireland's favourite takeaway dish - but what is it?". Irish Mirror. Archived from the original on 4 February 2016. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  7. ^ Diebold, Emily (28 October 2015). "The spice bag: Testing Dublin's latest takeaway craze on my family". Irish Independent. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  8. ^ Duggan, Keith (14 March 2015). "McMahon Leading by Example". Irish Times. Archived from the original on 14 March 2015. Retrieved 4 February 2016 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)). 
  9. ^ "There is a spice bag appreciation society on Facebook and the submissions are epic". DailyEdge.ie. 11 December 2015. Archived from the original on 4 February 2016. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  10. ^ "Lin Kee is Dublin's best spice bag". 27 November 2015. Archived from the original on 1 December 2015. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  11. ^ "Irish teens are using '#spicebag' to tag their 'stunning' Instagram selfies". DailyEdge.ie. 20 October 2015. Archived from the original on 20 February 2016. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  12. ^ Agnew, Róisín (9 October 2015). "A spice bag and a sneaky naggin: say hello to the Dublin Hun". Irish Times. Retrieved 4 February 2015. 
  13. ^ Parmentier, Audrey (30 October 2015). "FOOD - Le Spice Bag, un phénomène irlandais en pleine expansion" [The Spice Bag, an Irish phenomenon on the rise]. PetitJournal.com (in French). Archived from the original on 11 March 2016. Retrieved 8 March 2016. 
  14. ^ Demolder, Kate (25 May 2016). "11 Spice Bags From Around Ireland That You Need To Try Before You Die". Lovin Dublin. Retrieved 25 May 2016. 
  15. ^ Cuddihy, Tony (28 October 2015). "This Dublin university is holding a 'Spice Bag Speed Dating' event next week". Joe.ie. Archived from the original on 29 October 2015. Retrieved 5 November 2016. 
  16. ^ Cashin, Rory (17 October 2017). "The winner of the Best Spice Bag in Ireland Award has been announced". Joe.ie. Archived from the original on 17 October 2017. Retrieved 17 October 2017.