Spiny orb-weaver

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Spiny orb-weaver
Spiny backed orbweaver spider.jpg
G. cancriformis
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Araneidae
Genus: Gasteracantha
Sundevall, 1833[1]
Species

See text.

Spiny orb-weavers is a common name for Gasteracantha, a genus of spiders. They are also commonly called spiny-backed orb-weavers, due to the prominent spines on their abdomen (compare genus Isoxya). These spiders can reach sizes of up to 3 cm (1.2 in) in diameter (measured from spike to spike). Although their abdomen is shaped like a crab shell with spikes, it is not to be confused with a crab spider.

Often brightly colored, spiny orb-weavers have a broad, hard abdomen that can be white, orange, or yellow with red markings.[2] The female shell is ringed by six red or orange spines, whereas the smaller male lacks the spiny projections and instead has four to five stubby dark projections.[3]

Yellow spiny back orb weaver spider. Photographed in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Orb-weavers' bites are generally harmless to humans.[4]

Gasteracantha geminata

Species[edit]

As of April 2016, the World Spider Catalog accepted the following species:[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Gen. Gasteracantha Sundevall, 1833", World Spider Catalog, Natural History Museum Bern, retrieved 2016-04-22 
  2. ^ "Beneficial spiders in the landscape: #23 Spiny Orb Weaver Spider". aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu. Beneficials in the Garden & Landscape. 
  3. ^ Weber, Lynne; Weber, Jim (2011). Nature Watch Austin: Guide to the Seasons in an Urban Wildland. Amazon Digital Services LLC: Texas A&M University Press. p. 128. 
  4. ^ "Urban Spider Chart". 

External links[edit]