Spirit of '76 (mango)

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Mangifera 'Spirit of '76'
GenusMangifera
SpeciesMangifera indica
Hybrid parentage'Haden' × 'Zill'
Cultivar'Spirit of '76'
BreederLaurence H. Zill
OriginFlorida, US

The 'Spirit of '76' mango is a named mango cultivar that originated in south Florida.

History[edit]

The original tree was grown on the property of Laurence Zill of Boynton Beach, Florida and was reportedly a seedling of the Zill cultivar that had been open cross pollinated with Haden. It received its name for having first fruited during the US bicentennial celebrations. A 2005 pedigree analysis estimated that Spirit of '76 was indeed a Haden × Zill cross.[1]

Though Spirit of '76 did not gain commercial acceptance due to its soft flesh, it has been propagated as nursery stock and sold on a limited basis as a dooryard tree for home growers in Florida.

Spirit of '76 trees are planted in the collections of the USDA's germplasm repository in Miami, Florida,[2] and the Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park in Homestead, Florida.[3]

Description[edit]

The fruit is oblong in shape, with a rounded base and rounded apex that sometimes has a small lateral beak. It averages about a pound in weight at maturity. The skin color is yellow with red blush, and the flesh is yellow in color. It is completely fiberless with a rich, aromatic flavor, and contains a monoembryonic seed.[4] The fruit ripen from June to July in Florida.

The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading canopies.

See also[edit]

List of mango cultivars

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-06-18. Retrieved 2010-05-08.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/acc/display.pl?1554808 USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN). [Online Database] National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-08-09. Retrieved 2017-04-16.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Campbell, Richard J. (1992). A Guide to Mangos in Florida. Fairchild Tropical Garden. p. 161. ISBN 0-9632264-0-1.