Spooky (album)

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Spooky
Spooky (Lush album) cover art.jpg
Studio album by Lush
Released 27 January 1992
Recorded July – October 1991
Studio September Sound, London
Genre Shoegazing, dream pop
Length 43:37
Label 4AD
Producer Robin Guthrie
Lush chronology
Black Spring
(1991)Black Spring1991
Spooky
(1992)
Split
(1994)Split1994

Spooky is the second album by English alternative rock band Lush, produced by Robin Guthrie of Cocteau Twins. The album followed the band's debut mini album, Scar, several extended play releases, and the compilation album Gala. Spooky reached the UK Top 10 and topped the national indie charts. The album produced three singles: "Nothing Natural", "Superblast!" and "For Love".

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 3.5/5 stars[1]
Entertainment Weekly A−[2]
NME 7/10[3]
Pitchfork 8.7/10[4]
Rolling Stone 3/5 stars[5]
Select 4/5[6]

In 2016, Pitchfork ranked the album at number 27 in its list of "The 50 Best Shoegaze Albums of All Time".[7] In the album's entry, Paula Mejia said:

"Shortly after the release of their debut album, Spooky, Lush were invited to play Lollapalooza's mainstage by Perry Farrell himself. It helped the London quartet break through stateside, but was still a less-than-likely festival booking—because, unlike other rock records of the early 1990s, Spooky doesn't rely on blistering noise to make its points. Its brilliant intricacies remain best appreciated alone, through headphones, and preferably in a room where long shadows creep onto the walls. Each element in the mix—from the caffeinated basslines in "For Love" to the reverbed guitars in "Fantasy"—is layered on thickly yet proportionately. Its lyrical themes, which range from hazy dreams to long-lost friends, are helmed adroitly by co-vocalists and guitarists Emma Anderson and Miki Berenyi—together, they set a template for the kind of wistful musings that shoegaze became known for. Their incantations are only frightening in how wonderful they are".[7]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "Stray" Berenyi 2:07
2. "Nothing Natural" Anderson 5:54
3. "Tiny Smiles" Anderson, Berenyi 4:26
4. "Covert" Berenyi 3:34
5. "Ocean" Berenyi 4:49
6. "For Love" Berenyi 3:29
7. "Superblast!" Anderson 4:07
8. "Untogether" Berenyi 3:33
9. "Fantasy" Anderson 4:27
10. "Take" Berenyi 3:28
11. "Laura" Anderson 3:22
12. "Monochrome" Anderson 5:05

Release history[edit]

Country Date Label Format Catalogue #
United Kingdom 27 January 1992 4AD CD CAD 2002 CD
Limited CD in digipak sleeve CAD D 2002 CD
Double 10" vinyl CAD D 2002
United States 4 February 1992 4AD/Reprise CD 9 26798-2
Japan Nippon Columbia CD (two bonus tracks) COCY-80092

Singles[edit]

  • "Black Spring EP" (29 October 1991)
    • CD BAD 1016 (US only, Reprise Records 9 40231-2)
      1. "Nothing Natural" – 5:56
      2. "God's Gift" – 4:10
      3. "Monochrome" – 5:07
      4. "Nothing Natural (Version)" – 3:59
  • "For Love" (30 December 1991)
    • CD (BAD 2001 CD); 10" vinyl (BAD D 2001); 12" vinyl (BAD 2001)
      1. "For Love" – 3:32
      2. "Starlust" – 4:21
      3. "Outdoor Miner" – 2:46 (Wire cover)
      4. "Astronaut" – 2:37
  • "Superblast!" (Promo-only, January 1992)
    • Radio promo CD (PRO-CD-5471)
      1. "Superblast! (Gil Norton Remix)" – 4:04
      2. "Starlust" – 4:21
      3. "Fallin' in Love" – 2:38 (Dennis Wilson cover)
      4. "Superblast! (Album Version)" – 4:08

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kellman, Andy. "Spooky – Lush". AllMusic. Retrieved 1 October 2016. 
  2. ^ Browne, David (24 April 1992). "Spooky". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2 May 2017. 
  3. ^ Page, Betty (18 January 1992). "Filly Spectres". NME. Retrieved 1 October 2016. 
  4. ^ Reyes-Kulkarni, Saby (3 May 2016). "Lush: Origami". Pitchfork. Retrieved 1 October 2016. 
  5. ^ Reynolds, Simon (16 April 1992). "Lush: Spooky". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 21 August 2008. Retrieved 1 October 2016. 
  6. ^ Cavanagh, David (February 1992). "Lush: Spooky". Select (20): 64. Retrieved 1 October 2016. 
  7. ^ a b "The 50 Best Shoegaze Albums of All Time". Pitchfork. 24 October 2016. Retrieved 24 October 2016.