Spritzer: Difference between revisions

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{{refimprove|date=January 2011}}
 
{{refimprove|date=January 2011}}
 
A '''spritzer''' is a tall, chilled drink, usually made with [[white wine]] and [[seltzer water|seltzer]] or [[club soda]].
 
A '''spritzer''' is a tall, chilled drink, usually made with [[white wine]] and [[seltzer water|seltzer]] or [[club soda]].
  +
Water SPRITZER.
  +
Water spritzer techinque developed by the clark family dating back to 1753 when the tobacco industry went through its greatest drought and the slaves came up with the idea to use their own drinking water to moisten the tobacco so that they wouldnt be beat fro picking dry tobabcco
   
 
==Origin and variations==
 
==Origin and variations==

Revision as of 22:38, 12 March 2012

A spritzer is a tall, chilled drink, usually made with white wine and seltzer or club soda.

Water SPRITZER.

Water spritzer techinque developed by the clark family dating back to 1753 when the tobacco industry went through its greatest drought and the slaves came up with the idea to use their own drinking water to moisten the tobacco so that they wouldnt be beat fro picking dry tobabcco

Origin and variations

Spritzer is derived from the variant of the German language spoken in Austria, where the drink is very popular. It is used alongside the equally common form Gespritzter (mostly pronounced G'spritzter, a noun derived from the past participle of spritzen, i.e. squirt), a term also found in some German regions, such as Hessen (e.g. Süssgespritzter, i.e. a "sweet spritzer" using fizzy lemonade instead of soda water ("Sauergespritzter"). In Hessen, however, "gespritzt" usually refers not to a wine/water or wine/lemonade mix but to a mixture of soda water or lemonade and Apfelwein (in Central Hessian dialect, Ebblwoi), an alcoholic drink from fermented apple juice somewhat similar to (hard) cider but distinctly non-sweet. In most of Germany, the word "Schorle" is used to denote a Spritzer.

In Hungary, a popular drink mixed from wine and soda water in varying proportions is called fröccs.

In Romania, also, 1/3 white wine is mixed with 2/3s sparkling water and is called şpriţ de vară - summer spritzer.

In north-eastern regions of Italy, especially Venice and surroundings, a spritz is a very popular light cocktail, a mix of sparkling white wine (e.g., Prosecco), sparkling water, and Aperol, Bitter Campari, or other colored alcohols.

A new form of spritzer has appeared in south west France since 2005, known locally as "Rose Pression" and "Blanc Pression". It is wine based, carbonated and served in draught form on tap from kegs. Its alcoholic strength is thought to vary between 5% and 6% abv.[1]

Alcoholic spritzer

The word comes from the German spritzen "spatter, squirt, spray, sprinkle", i.e. adding water and thus diluting the wine so that it can be consumed in larger, thirst-quenching amounts.

Non-alcoholic spritzer

In the United States, some non-alcoholic carbonated juices are sold as spritzers. The same type of carbonated juice (actually made with juice and carbonated mineral water) is known in Germany as Saftschorle or Fruchtschorle. (Both short for rarely used Fruchtsaftschorle.) Particularly Apfelschorle (apple juice spritzer) is one of the most popular soft drinks in Germany. In Austria Apfelschorle is called Apfelsaft g'spritzt. ... g'spritzt can be combined with every juice, e.g. Orangensaft g'spritzt or Pago/Cappy g'spritzt (producers of juices).

Sometimes, non-alcoholic spritzers are made by mixing fruit juices (orange juice, cranberry juice, etc.) with carbonated water. Lemonade and iced tea may also be used.

See also

References

  1. ^ : CRA Midi-Pyrénées [Bulletin de veille n° 8 - 2e semestre 2005] :