Pumpkin soup

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Pumpkin soup
Kürbissuppe mit Kernöl.JPG
A bowl of pumpkin cream soup
TypeSoup
Serving temperatureHot or cold
Main ingredientsPumpkin, broth or stock

Pumpkin soup is a usually 'bound' (thick) soup made from a purée of pumpkin. It is made by combining the meat of a blended pumpkin with broth or stock.[1] It can be served hot or cold, and is a popular Thanksgiving dish in the United States.[2] Various versions of the dish are known in many European countries, the United States and other areas of North America, and in Australia. Pumpkin soup was a staple for the prisoners of war in North Vietnamese prison camps during the Vietnam War.[3]

Squash soup is a soup prepared using squash as a primary ingredient. Squash used to prepare the soup commonly includes acorn and butternut squash.[4][5]

Preparation[edit]

Squash that has initially been separately roasted can be used in soup preparation.[5] The roasting of squash can serve to concentrate the gourd's flavor.[5] Squash soup can be prepared with chunks or pieces of squash and also with puréed squash.[6][1] Pre-cooked, frozen squash can also be used,[7] as can commercially prepared packets of pre-cooked frozen squash purée.[8] Butternut squash soup may have a sweet flavor, due to the sugars present in the squash.[7] Additional basic ingredients in squash soup's preparation can include broth, onion, cream, spices such as sage and thyme, salt and pepper.[8] Pumpkin soup can be served hot or cold, and is a popular Thanksgiving dish in the United States.[2]

History[edit]

Pumpkin "pies" made by early American colonists had more similarities to being a savory soup served in a pumpkin[9] than a sweet custard in a crust.

Pumpkin soup was a staple for the prisoners of war in North Vietnamese prison camps during the Vietnam War.[3]

Squash soup is a soup in African cuisine. It is a part of the cuisine of Northern Africa,[10] and the cuisines of Mozambique[11] and Namibia,[4][12] both of which are located in Southern Africa. Squash soup is also served in other countries and is a part of other cuisines. Soup Joumou is traditionally consumed in Haiti on New Year's Day (January 1), as a historical tribute to Haitian independence in 1804.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bittman, Mark (1997-10-15). "The Minimalist; A Pumpkin Soup for Fall: It's Almost Too Easy". The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-10-23.
  2. ^ a b "Pumpkin Soup". Mahalo.com. Archived from the original on October 21, 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-23.
  3. ^ a b Maurer, Harry (1998). Strange Ground: An Oral History of Americans in Vietnam, 1945–1975. Da Capo Press. p. 415. ISBN 978-0-306-80839-5.
  4. ^ a b Long, L.M. (2016). Ethnic American Cooking: Recipes for Living in a New World. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. p. 203. ISBN 978-1-4422-6734-3.
  5. ^ a b c Soup. DK Publishing. 2009. p. 176. ISBN 978-0-7566-6549-4.
  6. ^ All-Time Best Soups. America's Test Kitchen. 2016. p. 126. ISBN 978-1-940352-80-0. Retrieved September 22, 2016.
  7. ^ a b Hensperger, B.; Kaufmann, J. (2007). Not Your Mother's Slow Cooker Recipes for Two. Not Your Mother's. Harvard Common Press. p. 26. ISBN 978-1-55832-341-4.
  8. ^ a b Stone, M. (2014). The Slow Cooker Soup Cookbook: Easy Slow-Cooker Soup Recipes. Soup Cookbook. Martha Stone. p. 9. ISBN 978-1-310-48947-1.
  9. ^ "American Classic IX: Pumpkin Pie". Good Eats.
  10. ^ Garratt, N. (2013). Mango and Mint: Arabian, Indian, and North African Inspired Vegan Cuisine. Tofu Hound Press. PM Press. p. 46. ISBN 978-1-60486-323-9.
  11. ^ Vos, H. (2010). Passion of a Foodie - An International Kitchen Companion. Strategic Book Publishing & Rights Agency (SBPRA). p. 446. ISBN 978-1-934925-63-8.
  12. ^ Hultman, T.; Service, Africa News (1986). The Africa News cookbook: African cooking for Western kitchens. Cookbook Series. Penguin. p. 21.

Further reading[edit]