Sri Sarma

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Sridevi Sarma
Born1972 (age 45–46)
Alma materMassachusetts Institute of Technology
Cornell University
Spouse(s)Rajan Naik
AwardsWhiting School of Engineering
Robert B. Pond Excellence in Teaching Award


Kumar Young Investigator Award - North American Neuromodulation Society (NANS)

GATech Biomedical Engineering Young Innovators Award

Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE)

NSF CAREER Award

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Awards at the Scientific Interface


LÕOreal USA for Women in Science Fellowship
Scientific career
InstitutionsThe Johns Hopkins University, Whiting School of Engineering
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Thesis (2006)
Academic advisorsMunther A. Dahleh
Emery Brown
Websitesarmalab.icm.jhu.edu

Sridevi Sarma (born 1972) is an American Biomedical and Electrical Engineer. Her research combines learning theory and control systems with neuroscience to create translational work aimed at improving therapies for neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and epilepsy.[1] Sarma has conducted research using control theoretic tools that provided an explanation of how deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy works for PD.[2]

Sarma is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering,[3] Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University. She is the associate director of the Institute for Computational Medicine[4] at the Whiting School of Engineering and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Biography[edit]

Sarma did her undergraduate studies at Cornell University where she received her Bachelor of Engineering degree in 1994. She then went to Massachusetts Institute of Technology and received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, in 1997 and 2006.[5] From 2000-2003 she took a leave of absence to start a data analytics company. From 2006-2009, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the MIT Brain and Cognitive Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[citation needed]

Sarma is a recipient of the GE faculty for the future scholarship, a National Science Foundation graduate research fellow, a L'Oreal For Women in Science fellow,[6] the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Careers at the Scientific Interface Award[7] the Krishna Kumar New Investigator Award from the North American Neuromodulation Society[8] and a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE)[9] and the Whiting School of Engineering Robert B. Pond Excellence in Teaching Award.[citation needed]

Work[edit]

Sarma has conducted fundamental research using control theoretic tools that provided an explanation of how deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy works for PD.[10] Through a biophysically-based model, she provided a different mechanism of how DBS works, namely that it does not create an information lesion (contrary to current view), but rather that high frequency DBS restores signals in the neural circuit that control movements.[citation needed]

Sarma has participated in the National Geographic TV series, Brain Games.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sri Sarma | World Science Festival". World Science Festival. Retrieved 2017-11-03.
  2. ^ Santaniello, Sabato; McCarthy, Michelle M.; Montgomery, Erwin B.; Gale, John T.; Kopell, Nancy; Sarma, Sridevi V. (2015-02-10). "Therapeutic mechanisms of high-frequency stimulation in Parkinson's disease and neural restoration via loop-based reinforcement". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 112 (6): E586–E595. doi:10.1073/pnas.1406549111. ISSN 0027-8424. PMC 4330724. PMID 25624501.
  3. ^ "Home | Johns Hopkins Department of Biomedical Engineering". Johns Hopkins Department of Biomedical Engineering. Retrieved 2017-11-03.
  4. ^ "BME's Sridevi Sarma appointed associate director of Institute for Computational Medicine | Whiting School of Engineering". Whiting School of Engineering. 2017-09-25. Retrieved 2017-11-03.
  5. ^ "Sridevi Sarma, MIT PhD '06 | MIT EECS". www.eecs.mit.edu. Retrieved 2017-11-03.
  6. ^ USA, L'Oreal. "L'Oréal USA For Women in Science Program Announces 2017 Changing the Face of STEM Grant Winners". www.prnewswire.com. Retrieved 2017-11-03.
  7. ^ "Announcement - Interface in Science Awards | Burroughs Wellcome Fund". www.bwfund.org. Retrieved 2017-11-03.
  8. ^ "Sri Sarma named inaugural recipient of the Krishna Kumar Award | Neuromedical Control Systems Lab". sarmalab.icm.jhu.edu. Retrieved 2017-11-03.
  9. ^ "Dr. Sridevi Sarma named recipient of a 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers | Neuromedical Control Systems Lab". sarmalab.icm.jhu.edu. Retrieved 2017-11-03.
  10. ^ Sarma, Sridevi V.; Cheng, Ming L.; Eden, Uri; Williams, Ziv; Brown, Emery N.; Eskandar, Emad (2012-07-26). "The effects of cues on neurons in the basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease". Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience. 6. doi:10.3389/fnint.2012.00040. ISSN 1662-5145. PMC 3405280. PMID 22855673.
  11. ^ Brain Games DIY: The Cup and Knife Game, retrieved 2017-11-03

External links[edit]