St. Albert (electoral district)

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St. Albert
Alberta electoral district
Location of St. Albert riding in Alberta (1997 and 2000 boundaries).png
St. Albert in relation to other federal electoral districts in Alberta (1996 redistribution)
Defunct federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
District created 1987
District abolished 2003
First contested 1988
Last contested 2000
Demographics
Population (2001) 123,877
Electors (2000) 83,800
Census divisions Division No. 11, Division No. 13

St. Albert was a federal electoral district in Alberta, Canada, that was represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1988 to 2004. It contained Edmonton's western and northwestern suburbs, including the city of St. Albert.

Demographics[edit]

Population, 2001 123,877
Population, 1996 105,853
Population, 1991 95,605
Population, 1986 82,993

Geography[edit]

This was a rural riding in Alberta.

History[edit]

It was created in 1987 from Pembina and Yellowhead ridings.

It was abolished in 2003 and transferred mostly into Edmonton—St. Albert and Edmonton—Spruce Grove. Smaller parts were transferred into Westlock—St. Paul and Yellowhead ridings.

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding elected the following Members of Parliament:

  1. 1988–1993: Walter van de WalleProgressive Conservative
  2. 1993–2003: John G. WilliamsReform (1993–2000), Canadian Alliance (2000–2003), Conservative (2003–2004)

Election results[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Alliance John G. Williams 32,745 59.50 +4.31 $52,437
Liberal Bob Russell 13,637 24.78 -3.73 $27,450
Progressive Conservative Andy Jones 5,687 10.33 -0.23 $2,797
New Democratic John Williams 2,965 5.39 +0.45 $1,382
Total valid votes/Expense limit 55,034 99.68
Total rejected ballots 176 0.32 +0.19
Turnout 55,210 65.88 +4.02
Eligible voters 83,800
Alliance hold Swing +4.02

^ Canadian Alliance change is from Reform.

Canadian federal election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Reform John G. Williams 24,269 55.19 +4.21 $39,524
Liberal Doug Kennedy 12,537 28.51 +0.21 $45,461
Progressive Conservative Mike Partington 4,645 10.56 -1.39 $20,713
New Democratic Jim Connelly 2,172 4.94 +2.01 $6,710
Independent Steven Powers 354 0.80 $3,673
Total valid votes/Expense limit 43,977 99.87
Total rejected ballots 58 0.13
Turnout 44,035 61.86
Eligible voters 71,184
Reform hold Swing +2.00

^ Change is from redistributed results

1993 federal election redistributed results[1]
Party Vote %
  Reform 24,632 50.97
  Liberal 13,674 28.30
  Progressive Conservative 5,778 11.96
  Others 2,827 5.85
  New Democratic 1,413 2.92
Canadian federal election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Reform John G. Williams 24,964 50.94 +37.00
Liberal Jack Jeffery 13,860 28.28 +11.56
Progressive Conservative Jerry Manegre 5,884 12.01 -34.71
National Steven Powers 2,219 4.53
New Democratic Zahid Makhdoom 1,435 2.93 -16.68
Christian Heritage Rudy Penner 294 0.60 -1.52
Natural Law Richard Day 257 0.52
Not affiliated Jennifer Vallee 90 0.18
Total valid votes 49,003
Reform gain from Progressive Conservative Swing +35.85
Canadian federal election, 1988
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive Conservative Walter van de Walle 19,945 46.72
New Democratic Dennis Pawlowski 8,370 19.60
Liberal Kent Davidson 7,140 16.72
Reform Ken Allred 5,955 13.95
Christian Heritage Dwayne O'Coin 904 2.12
Rhinoceros Hermann S. Kleen 197 0.46
Not affiliated Edward Goodliffe 127 0.30
Confederation of Regions Curtis L. Schoepp 57 0.13

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]