St. Andrew (provincial electoral district)

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St. Andrew
Ontario electoral district
Toronto Provincial Ridings 1926a.pdf
St. Andrew, in relation to the other Toronto ridings, after the 1926 redistribution.
Defunct provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Ontario
District created 1925
District abolished 1967
First contested 1926
Last contested 1963

St. Andrew was a provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that was established to elect Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) and then Members of Provincial Parliament (MPPs) to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

It was located in downtown Toronto, and was made up of the area to the east of Bathurst Street and west of Yonge Street, including Spadina Avenue and Kensington Market. The population of St. Andrew was largely immigrant, working class and Jewish. For many years it was one of the few electoral districts in North America to elect a Communist. J.B. Salsberg of the Labor-Progressive Party represented the riding from the 1943 election until his defeat in the 1955 election.

The riding was created in 1926, and existed until the 1967, when redistribution resulted in St. Andrew being merged with a neighbouring riding to form St. Andrew—St. Patrick.

St. Andrew riding took its name from the former "St. Andrew's ward" of the City of Toronto.

Members of Provincial Parliament[edit]

St. Andrew
Assembly Years Member Party
Created from parts of Toronto Southwest and Toronto Northwest in 1926
17th  1926–1929     William Robertson Flett Conservative
18th  1929–1934     Ephraim Frederick Singer Conservative
19th  1934–1937     J.J. Glass[nb 1] Liberal
20th  1937–1943
21st  1943–1945     J.B. Salsberg Labor–Progressive
22nd  1945–1948
23rd  1948–1951
24th  1951–1955
25th  1955–1959     Allan Grossman Progressive Conservative
26th  1959–1963
27th  1963–1967
Sourced from the Ontario Legislative Assembly[1]
Merged into St. Andrew—St. Patrick after 1967

Election results[edit]

1926 boundaries[edit]

Ontario general election, 1926
Party Candidate Votes[2][3] Vote %
    Conservative W.R. Flett 4,537 44.0
    Independent-Conservative Louis M. Singer 3,380 32.8
    Prohibitionist Oliver Hezzelwood 2,099 20.4
    Liberal A.G. McIntyre 297 0.9
Total 10,313
Ontario general election, 1929
Party Candidate Votes[4] Vote %
    Conservative Fred Singer 3,177 63.6
    Liberal J.J. Glass 1,816 36.4
Total 4,993

1934 boundaries[edit]

Toronto riding boundaries after 1934 redistribution
Ontario general election, 1934
Party Candidate Votes[5] Vote %
    Liberal J.J. Glass 5,841 42.4
    Conservative Fred Singer 4,441 32.3
Communist Meyer Klig 1,959 14.2
    Independent-Liberal Claude Pierce 1,338 9.7
    Independent-Conservative J.N. Day 186 1.4
Total 13,765
Ontario general election, 1937
Party Candidate Votes[6] Vote %
    Liberal J.J. Glass 6,481 38.6
    Labour Joseph B. Salsberg 6,302 37.6
    Conservative Nathan Phillips 3,097 18.5
    Co-operative Commonwealth Harry Simon 890 5.3
Total 16,770
Ontario general election, 1943
Party Candidate Votes[7] Vote %
Labor–Progressive Joseph B. Salsberg 7,434 53.6
    Conservative John Grudeff 2,452 17.7
    Liberal J.J. Glass 2,284 16.5
    Co-operative Commonwealth Murray Cotterill 1,689 12.2
Total 13,859
Ontario general election, 1945
Party Candidate Votes[8][nb 2] Vote %
Labor–Progressive Joseph B. Salsberg 9,580 53.2
    Conservative E.A Goodman 3,870 21.5
    Co-operative Commonwealth Percy Easser 2,373 13.2
    Liberal Thomas Harcourt 2,186 12.1
Total 18,009
Ontario general election, 1948
Party Candidate Votes[9] Vote %
Labor–Progressive J. B. Salsberg 9,851 49.6
    Conservative Nathan Phillips 4,903 24.7
    Co-operative Commonwealth J. Friedman 3,340 16.8
    Liberal Frank R. Mills 1,770 8.9
Total 19,864
Ontario general election, 1951
Party Candidate Votes[10] Vote %
Labor–Progressive J. B. Salsberg 5,164 39.6
    Conservative Louis Herman 3,854 29.5
    Liberal Alfred Green 2,183 16.7
    Co-operative Commonwealth Sam Resnick 1,854 14.2
Total 13,055
Ontario general election, 1955
Party Candidate Votes[11] Vote %
    Conservative Allan Grossman 5,060 41.2
Labor–Progressive J. B. Salsberg 4,380 35.7
    Co-operative Commonwealth Boris Mather 1,446 11.8
    Liberal L.S. Lockhart 1,231 10.0
    Independent Elizabeth Langfield 150 1.2
Total 12,267
Ontario general election, 1959
Party Candidate Votes[12] Vote %
    Conservative Allan Grossman 3,773 42.1
    Liberal Samuel Kelner 2,996 33.4
    Co-operative Commonwealth James Robertson 1,664 18.6
Labor–Progressive Bruce Magnuson 402 4.5
    Social Credit Dorothy Cureatz 132 1.5
Total 8,967
Ontario general election, 1963
Party Candidate Votes[13] Vote %
    Conservative Allan Grossman 4,309 43.9
    Liberal Donald Catalano 3,476 35.4
    New Democrat Ellen Adams 1,638 16.7
    Independent Sam Sherman 194 2.0
    Independent Dorothy Cureatz 103 1.0
    Social Credit Ross Taylor 102 1.0
Total 9,822

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In 1938, the title of Member of the Legislative Assembly was officially changed to Member of Provincial Parliament. Previously, it was unofficially used in the media and in the Legislature.
  2. ^ 179 out of 200 polls.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ For a listing of each MPP's Queen's Park curriculum vitae see below:
    • For William Robertson Flett's Legislative Assembly information see "William Robertson Flett, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-10. 
    • For Ephraim Frederick Singer's Legislative Assembly information see "Ephraim Frederick Singer, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-10. 
    • For John Judah Glass's Legislative Assembly information see "John Judah Glass, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-10. 
    • For J.B. Salsberg's Legislative Assembly information see "J.B. Salsberg, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-10. 
    • For Allan Grossman's Legislative Assembly information see "Allan Grossman, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-10. 
  2. ^ Canadian Press (1926-12-02). "Ontario General Elections and By-elections, 1923-1926". The Globe. Toronto. p. 7. 
  3. ^ "Sweep by Tories Returns 15 Wets in Toronto Seats". The Toronto Daily Star (Last Extra edition). Toronto. 1926-12-01. p. 1. 
  4. ^ "Vote Cast and Personnel of the New Ontario Legislature". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1929-10-31. p. 43. 
  5. ^ "Detailed Election Results". The Globe. Toronto. 1934-06-21. p. 3. 
  6. ^ "Ontario Voted By Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1937-10-07. p. 5. 
  7. ^ Canadian Press (1943-08-05). "Ontario Election Results". The Gazette. Montreal. p. 12. 
  8. ^ Canadian Press (1945-06-05). "How Ontario Electors Voted in all 90 Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. 5. Retrieved 2012-03-03. 
  9. ^ Canadian Press (1948-06-08). "How Ontario Electors Voted in all 90 Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. 24. 
  10. ^ Canadian Press (1951-11-22). "Complete Ontario Vote". The Montreal Gazette. Montreal. p. 4. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 
  11. ^ Canadian Press (1955-06-10). "Complete Results of Ontario Voting by Constituencies". The Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa. p. 4. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 
  12. ^ Canadian Press (1959-06-12). "Complete Results of Ontario Voting by Constituencies". The Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa. p. 26. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 
  13. ^ Canadian Press (1963-09-26). "78 in Tory Blue Wave -- 23 Is All Grits Saved". The Windsor Star. Windsor, Ontario. p. 25. Retrieved 2012-04-24.