St. Cecilia's Church and Convent (New York City)

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St. Cecilia Church
St-cecilia-church-nyc.jpg
Photographed in 2009
St. Cecilia's Church and Convent (New York City) is located in New York City
St. Cecilia's Church and Convent (New York City)
St. Cecilia's Church and Convent (New York City) is located in New York
St. Cecilia's Church and Convent (New York City)
St. Cecilia's Church and Convent (New York City) is located in the US
St. Cecilia's Church and Convent (New York City)
Location 112-120 E. 106th St., New York, New York
Coordinates 40°47′32″N 73°56′50″W / 40.79222°N 73.94722°W / 40.79222; -73.94722Coordinates: 40°47′32″N 73°56′50″W / 40.79222°N 73.94722°W / 40.79222; -73.94722
Built 1883-1887 (for church);[1][2] 1927 (for dwelling)[3]
Architect Napoleon LeBrun & Sons (for church); Neville & Basse; Thomas J. Duff of 348 West 14th Street (for 1927 dwelling)[3]
Architectural style Romanesque Revival
NRHP Reference # 84002796
Added to NRHP February 2, 1984[4]
St. Cecilia Church
General information
Architectural style Romanesque Revival
Town or city New York City
Country United States
Construction started 1883[3]
Completed 1883(for church)[4] / 1887 (for church);[1]
1907 (for the unified facade of the Reginal Angelorum)[1]
1927 (for dwelling house)[3]
Cost $60,000 (for 1927 dwelling house)[3]
Client Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York
Technical details
Structural system Brick masonry
Design and construction
Architect Napoleon LeBrun & Sons (for 1883-1887 church);[2][4] Neville & Basse[4] or Neville & Bagge (for the 1907 unified facade of the Reginal Angelorum)[1][2]
Thomas J. Duff of 348 West 14th Street (for 1927 dwelling house)[3]

St. Cecilia Church is a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York and a historic landmark located at 120 East 106th Street between Park Avenue and Lexington Avenue, Manhattan, New York City in the U.S. state of New York. The parish was established in 1873.[5] It was staffed by the Redemptorist Fathers from 1939-2007. The church was designated a New York City landmark in 1976.[2] The church and convent were listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1984.[4]

Buildings[edit]

The parish was established in 1883.[2] Construction began in 1883 to designs by Napoleon LeBrun & Sons.[6] The AIA Guide to New York City (2010) describes the church as an "ornate brick and terra-cotta facade is one of East Harlem's special treasures. Neo-Italian Romanesque, it has an exuberance that evaded most of Northern Europe." The church was completed in 1887 to the designs of Napoleon LeBrun & Sons, the Regina Angelorum (unified facade) was built 1907 to the designs of Neville & Bagge[1] In 1927, the church built a four-storey brick dwelling house at 123-25 East 105th Street to designs by Thomas J. Duff of 348 West 14th Street for $60,000.[3]

It was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1984.[4]

Location question[edit]

Although the Register's database claims that its address is 112-120 East 106th St.,[4] it is actually located along the south side of 106th Street between Lexington and Park Aves.[7] The AIA Guide to New York City (2010) gives the address as 122-120 East 106th Street, between Park and Lexington Avenues.[1] The Guide to NYC Landmarks (2007) claims the address as 112-120 East 106th Street.[2] Directories from the late nineteenth century gave the address as East 106th Street, near Lexington Avenue.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Norval White, Elliot Willensky, with Fran Leadon (in English), AIA Guide to New York City, (Fifth ed.). American Institute of Architects New York Chapter (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010) p.549. ISBN 978-0-19-538386-7.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Dolkart, Andrew S; Postal, Matthew A. (2004). Guide to New York City Landmarks. New York City Landmarks Preservation Committee. Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg (Author of Forward) (Third ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. p. 188. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Office for Metropolitan History, "Manhattan NB Database 1900-1986," (Accessed 25 Dec 2010).
  4. ^ a b c d e f g National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  5. ^ Remigius Lafort, S.T.D., Censor, The Catholic Church in the United States of America: Undertaken to Celebrate the Golden Jubilee of His Holiness, Pope Pius X. Volume 3: The Province of Baltimore and the Province of New York, Section 1: Comprising the Archdiocese of New York and the Diocese of Brooklyn, Buffalo and Ogdensburg Together with some Supplementary Articles on Religious Communities of Women.. (New York City: The Catholic Editing Company, 1914), p.321.
  6. ^ Historic Preservation Field Services Bureau (August 18, 1982). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Saint Cecilia's Church". Retrieved 2009-03-04.  and Accompanying four photos, exterior and interior, from 1980
  7. ^ St. Cecilia's Parish Home Page, St. Cecilia's Church, 2004. Accessed 2009-03-04.
  8. ^ The World Almanac 1892 and Book of Facts (New York: Press Publishing, 1892), p.390.

External links[edit]