St. George (Ontario provincial electoral district)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
St. George
Ontario electoral district
Toronto Provincial Ridings 1926a.pdf
St. George, in relation to the other Toronto ridings, after the 1926 redistribution.
Defunct provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Ontario
District created 1925
District abolished 1987
First contested 1926
Last contested 1985
For the former Manitoba riding of the same name, see St. George (Manitoba provincial electoral district)

St. George was a provincial riding in Ontario, Canada, that returned Members of Provincial Parliament (MPPs) to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario at Queen's Park. It was created in downtown Toronto in 1926 and was merged into the riding of St. George—St. David in 1987. The seat covered much of the city's central core, roughly similar to the current riding of Toronto Centre. At its dissolution it stretched from University Avenue to Parliament Street and from the waterfront north past St. Clair.

Boundaries[edit]

The riding was formed in 1926 from parts of the old Toronto Northeast and Toronto Southeast ridings. Its western boundary starting at Toronto Harbour went north following the line of Simcoe Street. At Queen Street West it jogged east a block to University Avenue. It followed this street north continuing along Queen's Park Crescent East and Avenue Road north to St. Clair Avenue West. At St. Clair it turned east and went to Yonge Street. At Yonge it turned south and followed this street to Bloor Street. It then turned east following Bloor until it reached Sherbourne Street. It then followed Sherbourne back south until it met the harbour.[1]

Prior to the 1934 election, the riding boundaries were changed. The western boundary was moved east to Bay Street. The boundary followed Bay Street north from the harbour until it curved northwest to meet Davenport Road. It followed Davenport until it met Avenue Road. It turned north following Avenue Road north skirting Upper Canada College on the east side until it met the old Belt Line Railway right-of-way. It then headed southeast following the right-of-way until it reached Yonge Street. From here it turned south following a line through the Mount Pleasant cemetery and through a ravine called the Vale of Avoca (these days it is called David Balfour Park). It followed the ravine until it reached the CPR right-of-way. It headed east along this right-of-way until it reached MacLennan Avenue. It then turned south following this street and continued south on the same line when it turned into Sherbourne Street at Bloor. It continued along Sherbourne Street until it reached the harbour.[2]

Members of Provincial Parliament[edit]

St. George
Assembly Years Member Party
Created in 1926 from parts of Toronto Northeast and Toronto Southeast[3]
17th  1926–1929     Henry Scholfield Conservative
18th  1929–1934
19th  1934–1937     Ian Strachan[nb 1] Liberal
20th  1937–1943
21st  1943–1945     Dana Porter[nb 2] Progressive Conservative
22nd  1945–1948
23rd  1948–1951
24th  1951–1955
25th  1955–1958
 1958–1959     Allan Lawrence[nb 3] Progressive Conservative
26th  1959–1963
27th  1963–1967
28th  1967–1971
29th  1971–1972
 1972–1975     Margaret Campbell Liberal
30th  1975–1977
31st  1977–1981
32nd  1981–1985     Susan Fish Progressive Conservative
33rd  1985–1987
Sourced from the Ontario Legislative Assembly[4]
Merged with St. David to form St. George—St. David after 1987

Election results[edit]

1926 boundaries[edit]

Ontario general election, 1926
Party Candidate Votes[3][5][nb 4] Vote %
    Conservative Henry Scholfield 7,699 57.1
    Prohibitionist J.W.S. Lowry 2,887 21.4
    Independent-Conservative Cecil W. Armstrong 1,600 11.9
    Independent-Conservative E.W.J. Owens 711 5.3
    Liberal W. M. Endle 587 4.4
Total 13,484
Ontario general election, 1929
Party Candidate Votes[6] Vote %
    Conservative Henry Scholfield 6,497 68.9
    Liberal G. Needham 2,927 31.1
Total 9,424

1934 boundaries[edit]

Toronto riding boundaries after 1934 redistribution
Ontario general election, 1934
Party Candidate Votes[7] Vote %
    Liberal Ian Strachan 8,286 45.3
    Conservative Henry Scholfield 7,901 43.2
    Co-operative Commonwealth I.W. Grant 1,883 10.3
    Independent J.J. Carrick 207 1.1
Total 18,277
Ontario general election, 1937
Party Candidate Votes[8][nb 5] Vote %
    Liberal Ian Strachan 10,915 52.4
    Conservative C.A. Maguire 8,465 40.6
    Labour Jean Laing 1,460 7.0
Total 20,840
Ontario general election, 1943
Party Candidate Votes[9] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Dana Porter 6,766 47.3
    Co-operative Commonwealth Francis Andrew Brewin 4,040 28.3
    Liberal Walter Thomson 3,104 21.7
    Independent-Soldier George Black 241 1.7
    Independent-Liberal Douglas Bell 148 1.0
Total 14,299

1945 boundaries[edit]

Ontario general election, 1945
Party Candidate Votes[10] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Dana Porter 11,940 54.2
    Co-operative Commonwealth Bert Carson 5,887 26.7
    Liberal Fred Needham 4,219 19.1
Total 22,046
Ontario general election, 1948
Party Candidate Votes[11] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Dana Porter 11,826 49.2
    Co-operative Commonwealth Frank Frier 7,285 30.3
    Liberal John A. MacVicar 4,907 20.4
Total 24,018
Ontario general election, 1951
Party Candidate Votes[12] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Dana Porter 10,004 56.9
    Co-operative Commonwealth Frank Frier 4,341 24.7
    Liberal Harvey Lynes 3,238 18.4
Total 17,583
Ontario general election, 1955
Party Candidate Votes[13][nb 6] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Dana Porter 7,298 55.6
    Liberal Joseph Keenan 3,282 25.0
    Co-operative Commonwealth Frank Frier 2,550 19.4
Total 13,130
By-election, May 12, 1958
Party Candidate Votes[14][nb 7] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Allan Lawrence 5,518 58.4
    Liberal Jean Brown 2,996 31.7
    Co-operative Commonwealth Iona Samis 851 9.0
    Social Credit Dorothy Cureatz 78 0.8
Total 9,443
Ontario general election, 1959
Party Candidate Votes[15] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Allan Lawrence 7,959 54.4
    Liberal Jean Brown 4,900 33.5
    Co-operative Commonwealth Iona Samis 1,781 12.2
Total 14,640
Ontario general election, 1963
Party Candidate Votes[16] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Allan Lawrence 9,144 54.1
    Liberal Vincent Reid 5,507 32.6
    New Democrat Kenneth Hamilton 1,927 11.4
    Social Credit Neil Carmichael 313 1.9
Total 1,891

1967 boundaries[edit]

Ontario general election, 1967
Party Candidate Votes[17] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Allan Lawrence 9,703 44.4
    Liberal Bruce Thomas 7,182 32.9
    New Democrat Harry Pope 4,972 22.7
Total 21,857
Ontario general election, 1971
Party Candidate Votes[18] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Allan Lawrence 14,525 56.1
    Liberal Peter Maloney 6,514 25.2
    New Democrat David Middleton 4,847 18.7
Total 25,886
By-election, March 15, 1973
Party Candidate Votes[19][nb 8] Vote %
    Liberal Margaret Campbell 8,390 42.7
    Progressive Conservative Roy McMurtry 7,039 35.8
    New Democrat Ellen Adams 3,950 20.1
Marxist–Leninist Hardial Bains 100 0.5
Communist Brian Mossop 86 0.4
    Western Guard John Ross Taylor 83 0.4
Total 19,648
Ontario general election, 1975
Party Candidate Votes[20] Vote %
    Liberal Margaret Campbell 10,677 41.8
    Progressive Conservative Frank Vasilkioti 8,505 33.3
    New Democrat Lukin Robinson 5,858 22.9
Communist Elizabeth Hill 272 1.1
    Independent Marshall Evoy 248 1.0
Total 25,560
Ontario general election, 1977
Party Candidate Votes[21] Vote %
    Liberal Margaret Campbell 10,289 37.0
    Progressive Conservative Frank Vasilkioti 9,807 35.3
    New Democrat Lukin Robinson 6,171 22.2
    Independent D.M. Campbell 1,083 3.9
Libertarian David T. Anderson 272 1.0
Communist Fred Weir 159 0.6
Total 27,781
Ontario general election, 1981
Party Candidate Votes[22] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Susan Fish 12,406 43.2
    Liberal Bruce McLeod 8,125 28.3
    New Democrat Dan Leckie 4,882 17.0
    Independent George Hislop 2,658 9.3
Libertarian Bruce Evoy 367 1.2
    Independent Rhino Mils 191 0.7
    Independent Gary Weagle 56 0.2
Total 28,685
Ontario general election, 1985
Party Candidate Votes[23][nb 9] Vote %
    Progressive Conservative Susan Fish 10,736 34.7
    New Democrat Diana Hunt 10,031 32.4
    Liberal Joe Mifsud 8,844 28.6
Libertarian Michael Beech 1,015 3.3
    Independent Karol Birczy 327 1.1
Total 30,953

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In 1938, the title of Member of the Legislative Assembly was officially changed to Member of Provincial Parliament. Previously, it was unofficially used in the media and in the Legislature.
  2. ^ Resigned January 30, 1958 to accept appointment as Chief Justice of the Ontario Court of Appeal.
  3. ^ Resigned September 19, 1972 in order to run for Federal parliament.
  4. ^ 106 out of 111 polls reporting.
  5. ^ 144 out of 147 polls reporting.
  6. ^ 127 out of 144 polls reporting.
  7. ^ 118 out of 119 polls reporting.
  8. ^ Results listed as 'nearly complete'.
  9. ^ 207 out of 220 polls reporting.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Map of Toronto showing Provincial election ridings and City Limits". Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1926-11-06. p. 22. 
  2. ^ "Toronto and Suburban Ridings in June 19th Election Fight". Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1934-06-12. p. 3. 
  3. ^ a b Canadian Press (1926-12-02). "Ontario General Elections and By-elections, 1923-1926". The Globe. Toronto. p. 7. 
  4. ^ For a listing of each MPP's Queen's Park curriculum vitae see below:
    • For Henry Scholfield's Legislative Assembly information see "Henry Scholfield, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-13. 
    • For Ian Strachan's Legislative Assembly information see "Ian Thomas Strachan, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-13. 
    • For Dana Porter's Legislative Assembly information see "Dana Harris Porter, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-13. 
    • For Allan Lawrence's Legislative Assembly information see "Allan Frederick Lawrence, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-13. 
    • For Margaret Campbell's Legislative Assembly information see "Margaret Campbell, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-13. 
    • For Susan Fish's Legislative Assembly information see "Susan A. Fish, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-13. 
  5. ^ "Sweep by Tories Returns 15 Wets in Toronto Seats". The Toronto Daily Star (Last Extra edition). Toronto. 1926-12-01. p. 1. 
  6. ^ "Vote Cast and Personnel of the New Ontario Legislature". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1929-10-31. p. 43. 
  7. ^ "Detailed Election Results". The Globe. Toronto. 1934-06-21. p. 3. 
  8. ^ "Ontario Voted By Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1937-10-07. p. 5. 
  9. ^ Canadian Press (1943-08-05). "Ontario Election Results". The Gazette. Montreal. p. 12. 
  10. ^ Canadian Press (1945-06-05). "How Ontario Electors Voted in all 90 Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. 5. Retrieved 2012-03-03. 
  11. ^ Canadian Press (1948-06-08). "How Ontario Electors Voted in all 90 Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. 24. 
  12. ^ Canadian Press (1951-11-22). "Complete Ontario Vote". The Montreal Gazette. Montreal. p. 4. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 
  13. ^ Canadian Press (1955-06-10). "Complete Results of Ontario Voting by Constituencies". The Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa. p. 4. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 
  14. ^ Canadian Press (May 13, 1958). "Conservatives sweep All Four By-elections". Globe and Mail. Toronto. p. 1. 
  15. ^ Canadian Press (1959-06-12). "Complete Results of Ontario Voting by Constituencies". The Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa. p. 26. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 
  16. ^ Canadian Press (1963-09-26). "78 in Tory Blue Wave -- 23 Is All Grits Saved". The Windsor Star. Windsor, Ontario. p. 25. Retrieved 2012-04-24. 
  17. ^ Canadian Press (1967-10-18). "Tories win, but...". The Windsor Star. Windsor, Ontario. p. B2. Retrieved 2012-04-30. 
  18. ^ Canadian Press (1971-10-22). "Here's who won on the Metro ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. 12. 
  19. ^ "Liberals thump PCs in St. George, Huron". The Globe and Mail. Toronto: Canadian Press. March 16, 1973. p. 1. 
  20. ^ Canadian Press (1975-09-19). "Results from the 29 ridings in Metro". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. A18. 
  21. ^ Canadian Press (1977-06-10). "How they voted in Metro area". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. A10. 
  22. ^ "Complete results from across Ontario". Ottawa Citizen. March 20, 1981. Retrieved May 10, 2012. 
  23. ^ Canadian Press (1985-05-03). "The night the Tories tumbled; riding by riding results". Ottawa Citizen. Toronto. p. 43. Retrieved 2012-05-10.