St. John's Church (Newark, New Jersey)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
St. John's Church
ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, NEWARK, ESSEX COUNTY NJ.jpg
St. John's Church (Newark, New Jersey) is located in Essex County, New Jersey
St. John's Church (Newark, New Jersey)
St. John's Church (Newark, New Jersey) is located in New Jersey
St. John's Church (Newark, New Jersey)
St. John's Church (Newark, New Jersey) is located in the United States
St. John's Church (Newark, New Jersey)
Location22-26 Mulberry Street, Newark, New Jersey
Coordinates40°44′17″N 74°9′58″W / 40.73806°N 74.16611°W / 40.73806; -74.16611Coordinates: 40°44′17″N 74°9′58″W / 40.73806°N 74.16611°W / 40.73806; -74.16611
Area1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built1827
ArchitectMoran, Father Patrick
Architectural styleEnglish Norman Perpendicular
NRHP reference #72000789[1]
NJRHP #[2]
Added to NRHPOctober 30, 1972

St. John's Church is a historic Roman Catholic parish church located within the Archdiocese of Newark at 22-26 Mulberry Street in Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, United States. St. John's Church is the state's third-oldest Catholic church.[citation needed]

History[edit]

In 1826 the congregation was held its first meeting in the basement of Charles Durning's home. Construction of the current building began in 1827.[3] Later renovations and additions took place throughout the 19th and 20th centuries and incorporated the original structure's walls. When the church was first built, it was the only church in northern New Jersey and was originally part of the Diocese of New York. The church currently runs a soup kitchen, women's shelter, and art gallery for children. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.[4][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places - Essex County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection - Historic Preservation Office. April 1, 2010. p. 5. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 27, 2009. Retrieved August 21, 2010.
  3. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/1999/03/28/nyregion/places-heart-historic-houses-worship-soaring-spires-simple-quaker-meeting-houses.html?pagewanted=all
  4. ^ http://www.njchurchscape.com/Newark-StJohn's.html
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-11-29. Retrieved 2010-12-06.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)