St. John's South (provincial electoral district)

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St. John's South
Newfoundland and Labrador electoral district
St. John's South.png
St. John's South in relation to other districts in St. John's
Provincial electoral district
Legislature Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly
Last contested 2011
Demographics
Population (2006) 11,832
Electors (2011) 7,923

St. John’s South is a provincial electoral district for the House of Assembly of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. As of 2011, there are 7,923 eligible voters living within the district.[1]

Historically working class in nature, St. John's South includes increasingly prosperous residential pockets. The district covers the traditional "west end" of St. John's (now geographically closer to the centre, due to city expansion), the western section of the downtown core and the south side of the harbour to Cape Spear, including the neighbourhood of Shea Heights. In the 2007 redistribution, four per cent of Kilbride was added.[2]

Members of the House of Assembly[edit]

The district has elected the following Members of the House of Assembly:

  Member Party Term
  Tom Osborne Liberal 2013–2015
      Independent 2012-2013
  Progressive Conservative  1996-2012
  Tom Murphy Liberal 1989-1996
  John Collins Progressive Conservative 1975-89
  Robert Wells Progressive Conservative 1972-1975
  Hugh J. Shea Progressive Conservative 1971-1972
  John A. Nolan Liberal 1966-1971
  Rex Renouf Progressive Conservative 1962-1966
  John R. O'Dea United Newfoundland Party 1959-1962
  Rex Renouf Progressive Conservative 1957-1959
  William Browne Progressive Conservative 1956-1957

[2]

Election results[edit]

Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 2,966 57.90%
  NDP Keith Dunne 1,994 38.92%
Liberal Trevor Hickey 163 3.18%
Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2007
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 3887 79.6%
  NDP Clyde Bridger 571 11.69%
Liberal Rex Gibbons 425 8.7%

[3]

Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2003
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 4,532
Liberal Dennis O'Keefe* 756
  NDP Tom McGinnis 676

[4]

  • Dennis O'Keefe who ran as the Liberal candidate is not the same Dennis O'Keefe that is currently Mayor of St. John's.
Newfoundland general election, 1999
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 4,041 66.32%
Liberal Patrick Kennedy 1563 25.65%
  NDP Judy Vanata 374 6.14%
  Independent Jason Crummey 101 1.66%

[5]

Newfoundland general election, 1996
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 2,521 42.17%
Liberal Tom Murphy 2,417 40.43%
  NDP Sue Skipton 858 14.35%
  Independent Bill Maddigan 155 2.59%

[5]

Newfoundland general election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Tom Murphy 2,432 47.97%
Progressive Conservative Jerome Quinlan 2,040 40.24%
  NDP Bert Pitcher 576 11.36%

[5]

Newfoundland general election, 1989
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Thomas Murphy 2107
Progressive Conservative Douglas Atkinson 2105
  NDP Linda Hyde 679

[6]

Newfoundland general election, 1985
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative John Collins 2466
Liberal Dolores Linehan 1145
  NDP Bob Matthews 924

[6]

Newfoundland general election, 1982
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative John Collins 2286
Liberal Ernest Antle 582
  NDP Barbara Roberts 235

[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Summary of Polling Divisions ST. JOHN'S SOUTH" (PDF). Elections Newfoundland and Labrador. 3 August 2011. Retrieved 4 September 2011. 
  2. ^ a b CBC news NL votes 2007 district profiles
  3. ^ Newfoundland & Labrador Votes 2007. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved May 22, 2009.
  4. ^ Newfoundland & Labrador Votes 2003. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved May 22, 2009.
  5. ^ a b c General Election Reports. Elections Newfoundland & Labrador. Retrieved April 6, 2011.
  6. ^ a b c Report of the Chief Electoral Officer. Retrieved April 13, 2011.

External links[edit]