St John the Baptist Church, Beeston

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
St John the Baptist
St.John the Baptist Beeston.JPG
St John the Baptist, Beeston
Coordinates: 52°55′32″N 1°13′0″W / 52.92556°N 1.21667°W / 52.92556; -1.21667
Location Beeston, Nottinghamshire
Country England
Denomination Church of England
Churchmanship Broad Church
Website beestonparishchurch.co.uk
History
Dedication St John the Baptist
Consecrated 5 September 1844
Architecture
Heritage designation Grade II listed[1]
Architect(s) George Gilbert Scott
Groundbreaking 1842
Completed 1844
Construction cost £3,600 (£330,417 in 2016)[2]
Specifications
Length 115.66 feet (35.25 m)
Width 49.5 feet (15.1 m)
Nave width 24.2 feet (7.4 m)
Height 64 feet (20 m)
Administration
Parish Beeston
Deanery Nottingham South
Archdeaconry Nottingham
Diocese Diocese of Southwell and Nottingham
Province Province of York
Clergy
Vicar(s) Fr. Wayne Plimmer
Laity
Organist(s) Phil Sherratt

St. John the Baptist Church is an Anglican church in Beeston, Nottinghamshire, England.

The church is Grade II listed by the Department for Culture, Media & Sport as it is a building of special architectural or historic interest.[1]

History[edit]

The church is medieval and the chancel remains, but the remainder was heavily restored and rebuilt in 1842 by George Gilbert Scott and William Bonython Moffatt. It was consecrated on 5 September 1844 by the Bishop of Lincoln.[3]

The organ chamber was added in 1876 by Evans and Jolley of Nottingham.[4] A new lectern and chancel stalls were provided. The chancel stalls were made by Mr. Tattershall of London.

An £860,000 re-ordering and renovation in 2007 moved the main entrance to the west end, and cleaned the interior, with new heating, seating and a new organ.

The font dates from the reign of King Henry III.

List of incumbents[edit]

  • 1267 John de Brademare
  • 1275 Matthew de Leycestre
  • 1327 William de Wyllesthorpe
  • 1339 William de Beckford
  • 1349 Thomas de Oxton
  • 1376 William Askham
  • 1384/5 Richard Mason of Chillwell
  • 1401/2 Henry Serle
  • 1405 Thomas Mareschall (or Marchall)
  • 1420/1 John Thymelby (or Themelby)
  • 1423 John Gynger
  • 1431 John Ketul
  • 1451 John Meyson
  • 1455 Nicholas Bubwith
  • 1456/7 William Taylor
  • 1457 Richard Ellesley
  • 1465 Nicholas Blakwall
  • 1500/1 Richard Burton
  • 1510 Christopher Twistfeld
  • 1528 William Garford
  • 1538 John Mottram
  • 1557 Nicholas Holmes
  • 1562 John Fisher
  • 1592 William Jeffreys
  • 1603/4 Walter Kynnersley or Kindersley.
  • 1650 William Westoby
  • 1661 William Crosse
  • 1662/3 Henry Watkinson
  • 1711 Thomas Trowell
  • 1744 John Henson
  • 1758 Timothy Wylde
  • 1799 Thomas Bigsby
  • 1822 John Francis Thomas Hurt
  • 1854 Thomas John Oldrini
  • 1885 Richard Davies Harries
  • 1901 Arthur Curtis Beckton
  • 1906 Miles Hammett Pitts- Tucker
  • 1914 William Pakenham Cole-Sheane
  • 1924 Leonard Norman Phillips
  • 1936 George Hansford
  • 1943 John Paul Henry Halet
  • 1962 Frederic Norman Keen
  • 1970 John Anthony Johnson
  • 1986 Stephen Arthur Lowe
  • 2000 George Bryan Barrodale
  • 2006 Wayne Plimmer

Organ[edit]

The first known organ was installed in 1854[5] by Kirkland and Jardine of Manchester. It cost £300, raised by subscription and was installed on a gallery.[6] It was opened on Tuesday 25 April 1854.

Some extra stops were added in 1856 and in 1876 it was further enlarged and improved and moved to chancel following demolition of gallery.[7] In 1903 and 1909 it was renovated by Charles Lloyd of Nottingham and underwent further renovation in 1946. It was removed and replaced with an electronic organ in 1983. This has subsequently been replaced by a new electronic organ in 2008.

List of organists[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Historic England. "Church of St John the Baptist, Church Street  (Grade II) (1263823)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 10 September 2015. 
  2. ^ UK Retail Price Index inflation figures are based on data from Clark, Gregory (2017). "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved 6 November 2017. 
  3. ^ "Consecration of Beeston Church". Derby Mercury. Derby. 11 September 1844. Retrieved 10 September 2015. 
  4. ^ "Church Organ Re-Opening at Beeston". Nottinghamshire Guardian. Nottingham. 3 March 1876. Retrieved 10 September 2015. 
  5. ^ Nottinghamshire Guardian - Thursday 4 May 1854
  6. ^ Nottinghamshire Guardian - Thursday 27 April 1854
  7. ^ Nottinghamshire Guardian - Friday 3 March 1876
  8. ^ History, Gazetteer & Directory of Nottinghamshire, 1885, p.76
  9. ^ Nottinghamshire Guardian - Saturday 14 September 1895
  10. ^ Dictionary of Organs and Organists. First Edition. 1912
  11. ^ Dictionary of Organs and Organists. Second Edition. 1921
  12. ^ Nottingham Evening Post 4 February 1931
  13. ^ Who's Who in Music. Fourth Edition. 1962. p.4
  14. ^ Who's who in Music. Shaw Publishing Ltd. First Post-war Edition. 1940-50
  15. ^ Deceased

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]