St. Joseph County, Indiana

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Saint Joseph County
Old St. Joseph County courthouse in South Bend, Indiana
Old St. Joseph County courthouse in South Bend, Indiana
Flag of Saint Joseph County
Official seal of Saint Joseph County
Map of Indiana highlighting Saint Joseph County
Location within the U.S. state of Indiana
Map of the United States highlighting Indiana
Indiana's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 41°37′00″N 86°17′23″W / 41.61672°N 86.28986°W / 41.61672; -86.28986
Country United States
State Indiana
Founded1830
Named forSt. Joseph River
SeatSouth Bend
Largest citySouth Bend
Area
 • Total461.38 sq mi (1,195.0 km2)
 • Land457.85 sq mi (1,185.8 km2)
 • Water3.54 sq mi (9.2 km2)  0.77%%
 • Density580/sq mi (224/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websitewww.sjcindiana.com
 
  • Indiana county number 71
  • Fifth-most populous county in Indiana as of 2010

St. Joseph County, commonly called St. Joe County by residents, is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. As of the 2020 census, the population was 272,912,[1] making it the fifth-most populous county in Indiana. Formed in 1830, it was named for the St. Joseph River which flows through it to Lake Michigan. The county seat is South Bend.[2] St. Joseph County is part of the South Bend–Mishawaka, IN-MI, Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 461.38 square miles (1,195.0 km2), of which 457.85 square miles (1,185.8 km2) (or 99.23%) is land and 3.54 square miles (9.2 km2) (or 0.77%) is water.[3]

Cities[edit]

St. Joseph River, flowing into St. Joseph County from Elkhart County (top) through Mishawaka

Towns[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated places[edit]

Townships[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Climate and weather[edit]

South Bend, Indiana
Climate chart (explanation)
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Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[4]

In recent years, average temperatures in South Bend have ranged from a low of 16 °F (−9 °C) in January to a high of 83 °F (28 °C) in July, although a record low of −22 °F (−30 °C) was recorded in January 1943 and a record high of 109 °F (43 °C) was recorded in July 1934. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 1.98 inches (50 mm) in February to 4.19 inches (106 mm) in June.[4]

Government[edit]

The county government is a constitutional body, and is granted specific powers by the Constitution of Indiana, and by the Indiana Code.

County Council: The county council is the legislative branch of the county government and controls all the spending and revenue collection in the county. Representatives are elected from county districts. The council members serve four-year terms. They are responsible for setting salaries, the annual budget, and special spending. The council also has limited authority to impose local taxes, in the form of an income and property tax that is subject to state level approval, excise taxes, and service taxes.[5][6]

District Councilperson Party
A Bobby Kruszynski, Jr. Democratic
B Corey Noland Democratic
C Dick Pfeil Republican
D Rafael Morton, President Democratic
E Diana Hess Democratic
F Mark Telloyan Republican
G Mark Catanzarite, Vice President pro tem Democratic
H Joe Canarecci Democratic
I Mark Root, President pro tem Republican

Board of Commissioners: The executive body of the county is made of a board of commissioners. The commissioners are elected county-wide, in staggered terms, and each serves a four-year term. One of the commissioners, typically the most senior, serves as president. The commissioners are charged with executing the acts legislated by the council, collecting revenue, and managing the day-to-day functions of the county government.[5][6]

District Commissioner Party
1 Andrew Kostielney, President Republican
2 Derek Dieter[7] Republican
3 Deborah Fleming Vice President Republican

Court: The county maintains several courts: the Circuit Court that hears primarily civil matters and some criminal cases. The judge on the court is elected to a term of six years and must be a licensed attorney in good standing. The judge is assisted by three magistrates appointed by the judge. The Superior Court hears both civil and criminal cases, including small claims and traffic/misdemeanor cases. There are eight judges appointed to the Superior Court by the Governor of Indiana. They are assisted by four magistrates who handle the small claims and traffic/misdemeanor dockets. The Probate Court hears juvenile cases, child abuse or neglect cases, along with probate matters. The judge on the court is elected to a term of six years and must be a licensed attorney in good standing. The judge is assisted by three magistrates and one commissioner (similar to a magistrate) who are appointed by the judge. Decisions from these courts can be appealed to the Indiana Court of Appeals.[6]

Office Judge Party
Circuit Court John Broden Democratic

County Officials: The county has several other elected offices, including sheriff, coroner, auditor, treasurer, recorder, surveyor, and circuit court clerk. Each of these elected officers serves a term of four years and oversees a different part of county government. Members elected to county government positions are required to declare party affiliations and to be residents of the county.[6]

Office Officeholder Party
Assessor Rosemary Mandrici Democratic
Auditor Mike Hamann Democratic
Clerk Rita Glenn Democratic
Coroner Michael J. McGann Democratic
Prosecutor Ken Cotter Democratic
Recorder Phil Dotson Democratic
Sheriff William Redman Democratic
Surveyor John McNamara Democratic
Treasurer Michael Kruk Democratic

St. Joseph County is part of Indiana's 2nd congressional district and is vacant in the United States Congress.[8] Indiana's US Senators are Mike Braun and Todd Young.

St. Joseph County hasn't voted for a popular vote loser since 1976, tied for the longest streak in the country with Caddo Parish, Louisiana, and Rockland County, New York. In 2016 and 2000, it voted for Hillary Clinton and Al Gore, respectively, both of whom lost the electoral college but won the popular vote.

Since the Civil War, it only voted for popular vote losers in 1876, 1968, and the aforementioned 1976.[9] In 1876 Rutherford B. Hayes won the election without winning the popular vote.

United States presidential election results for St. Joseph County, Indiana[10][11]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 53,164 46.13% 59,896 51.98% 2,178 1.89%
2016 52,021 46.51% 52,252 46.72% 7,569 6.77%
2012 52,578 47.36% 56,460 50.86% 1,971 1.78%
2008 48,510 40.85% 68,710 57.87% 1,519 1.28%
2004 55,254 50.87% 52,637 48.46% 728 0.67%
2000 47,581 48.81% 47,703 48.94% 2,190 2.25%
1996 38,281 41.08% 45,704 49.04% 9,203 9.88%
1992 38,934 37.27% 46,203 44.23% 19,328 18.50%
1988 49,481 50.56% 48,056 49.10% 327 0.33%
1984 54,404 53.08% 47,513 46.36% 576 0.56%
1980 50,607 49.08% 44,218 42.88% 8,289 8.04%
1976 50,358 50.20% 49,156 49.00% 810 0.81%
1972 64,808 60.55% 41,629 38.89% 602 0.56%
1968 47,114 44.09% 47,414 44.37% 12,336 11.54%
1964 39,872 37.49% 65,844 61.91% 630 0.59%
1960 53,621 45.64% 63,553 54.09% 325 0.28%
1956 57,827 51.41% 54,152 48.15% 493 0.44%
1952 53,537 49.74% 53,269 49.49% 826 0.77%
1948 39,593 43.58% 49,866 54.89% 1,387 1.53%
1944 39,875 45.53% 47,149 53.83% 565 0.65%
1940 36,164 44.02% 45,620 55.53% 374 0.46%
1936 25,807 36.69% 43,131 61.32% 1,401 1.99%
1932 28,198 41.13% 38,026 55.46% 2,339 3.41%
1928 36,844 57.56% 26,846 41.94% 316 0.49%
1924 23,682 57.65% 15,056 36.65% 2,344 5.71%
1920 17,675 56.46% 12,355 39.47% 1,275 4.07%
1916 7,961 43.02% 9,709 52.47% 835 4.51%
1912 3,146 20.17% 5,391 34.56% 7,064 45.28%
1908 11,222 53.92% 8,562 41.14% 1,029 4.94%
1904 11,166 62.54% 5,967 33.42% 721 4.04%
1900 8,127 53.10% 6,948 45.40% 230 1.50%
1896 7,138 52.79% 6,247 46.20% 136 1.01%
1892 5,220 44.93% 6,077 52.30% 322 2.77%
1888 4,929 47.40% 5,257 50.56% 212 2.04%


Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830287
18406,4252,138.7%
185010,95470.5%
186018,45568.5%
187025,32237.2%
188033,17831.0%
189042,45728.0%
190058,88138.7%
191084,31243.2%
1920103,30422.5%
1930160,03354.9%
1940161,8231.1%
1950205,05826.7%
1960238,61416.4%
1970245,0452.7%
1980241,617−1.4%
1990247,0522.2%
2000265,5597.5%
2010266,9310.5%
2020272,9122.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900-1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010-2019[1]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 266,931 people, 103,069 households, and 66,365 families residing in the county.[16] The population density was 583.0 inhabitants per square mile (225.1/km2). There were 114,849 housing units at an average density of 250.8 per square mile (96.8/km2).[3] The racial makeup of the county was 78.7% white, 12.7% black or African American, 1.9% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 3.4% from other races, and 2.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 7.3% of the population.[16] In terms of ancestry, 25.3% were German, 15.5% were Irish, 12.0% were Polish, 8.5% were English, and 4.5% were American.[17]

Of the 103,069 households, 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.1% were married couples living together, 13.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 35.6% were non-families, and 29.1% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.07. The median age was 36.2 years.[16]

The median income for a household in the county was $47,697 and the median income for a family was $57,510. Males had a median income of $45,269 versus $31,667 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,082. About 10.7% of families and 14.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.7% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.[18]

Education[edit]

K-12 schools[edit]

School districts include:[19]

Public high schools in the county include:

Private schools

Catholic schools on this list are operated by or associated with the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fort Wayne–South Bend

  • Christ the King [Grades K-8]
  • Corpus Christi [Grades K-8]
  • Covenant Christian School [Grades K-8]
  • Granger Christian School [Grades K-12]
  • Holy Cross Elementary [Grades K-8]
  • Holy Family Elementary [Grades K-8]
  • Ironwood Christian School [Grades K-12]
  • Mishawaka Catholic School (St. Bavo Campus, St. Joseph Campus & St. Monica Campus) [Grades ECD-8]
  • Michiana Christian School [Grades K-5]
  • Mishawaka First Baptist School [Grades K-12]
  • Marian High School [Grades 9-12]
  • North Liberty Christian School [Grades K-5]
  • Our Lady of Hungary [Grades K-8]
  • Queen of Peace School [Grades K-6]
  • Resurrection Lutheran Academy [Grades Pre K-8]
  • St. Adalbert Elementary [Grades K-8]
  • St. Anthony de Padua School [Grades K-8]
  • St. John the Baptist Elementary [Grades K-8]
  • St. Joseph Grade School [Grades K-8]
  • St. Jude Elementary [Grades K-8]
  • St. Mary of the Assumption School [Grades K-8]
  • St. Matthew Elementary [Grades K-8]
  • St. Patrick School [Grades K-6]
  • St. Pius X School [Grades Pre K-8]
  • South Bend Christian Center [Grades K-12]
  • South Bend Junior Academy [Grades K-8]
  • South Bend St. Joseph's High School [Grades 9-12]
  • Stanley Clark School [Grades K-8]
  • Trinity School at Greenlawn [Grades 6-12]

Colleges & universities[edit]

St. Joseph County Public Library[edit]

History[edit]

The St. Joseph County Public Library was founded in 1889. Originally known as the South Bend Public Library, it was founded by the South Bend School Corporation and managed by Evelyn Humphries out of a floor of the Oliver Opera House. Humphries soon secured funding for the building of the Main Library which opened to the public in 1896. It was known as "The Castle" due to its unique architecture.[20] In 1902, Virginia Tutt became the second library director. She opened the first library branch in Washington High School in 1918, which often served as a community center for Polish and Hungarian immigrants. The Betty Ruth Spiro Memorial Library replaced "The Castle" in 1959 as the new main library building in downtown South Bend. This building served the community until its renovation in 1992 led to a fire and subsequent damage from smoke and fire sprinklers. The renovation continued and the library was able to open 7 days later thanks to help from the community.[21] In 2016, Main Library began looking at the need for an expanded space in downtown South Bend to meet the needs of the growing community. After working with consultants and architects, it was decided in October 2018 that Main Library will expand to include a community learning center, renovated exterior, and inner courtyard.[22] St. Joseph County is considering cutting the library's funding by almost $500,000 a year. As a result, on September 5, 2019, hundreds of residents protested in the streets, and all library branches closed early. Overflow crowds backed the county council meeting to show their support for the library.[23]

Branches[edit]

  • Main Library
  • Centre Township Branch
  • Francis Branch
  • German Township Branch
  • Lakeville Branch
  • LaSalle Branch
  • North Liberty Branch
  • River Park Branch
  • Tutt Branch
  • Western Branch

Library Services[edit]

Studio 304[edit]

Technology hub where patrons can explore 3-D printing, poster printing, iPads, Adobe Creative Suite, gaming, virtual reality rigs, and recording rooms.[24]

Local and Family History[edit]

Books, newspapers, yearbooks, magazines, and other items of local significance can be examined. Online archives and genealogical websites are also available to reference in the creation of family trees.[25]

Databases[edit]

SJCPL subscribes to over 50 databases that can aid in research, education, grant writing, and business development.[26]

Homebound Delivery[edit]

Library staff members will bring library materials directly to your home if requested.[27]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "St. Joseph County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 25, 2011.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ a b "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2015.
  4. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for South Bend, Indiana". The Weather Channel. Retrieved January 27, 2011.
  5. ^ a b Indiana Code. "Title 36, Article 2, Section 3". IN.gov. Retrieved September 16, 2008.
  6. ^ a b c d Indiana Code. "Title 2, Article 10, Section 2" (PDF). IN.gov. Retrieved September 16, 2008.
  7. ^ "Board of Commissioners | St. Joseph County, IN".
  8. ^ "US Congresswoman Jackie Walorski". US Congress. Retrieved June 5, 2013.
  9. ^ "Presidential election of 1876 - Map by counties". geoelections.free.fr. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  10. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 20, 2018.
  11. ^ The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 5,240 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 1,285 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 452 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 87 votes.
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  14. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  16. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2015.
  17. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2015.
  18. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2015.
  19. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: St. Joseph County, IN" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2022. - Text list
  20. ^ "Library History". Michiana Memory. Retrieved November 25, 2018.
  21. ^ "Our History". Saint Joseph County Public Library. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  22. ^ Parrott, Jeff. "Downtown South Bend library proposes dramatic, $38-million overhaul". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  23. ^ "St. Joseph Co. libraries close early in protest of plan to cut funding by close to $500k". WSBT News. September 5, 2019. Retrieved September 10, 2019.
  24. ^ "Studio 304 Digital Media Lab". St. Joseph County Public Library. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  25. ^ "Local and Family History". St. Joseph County Public Library. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  26. ^ "Database and Articles". St. Joseph County Public Library. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  27. ^ "Homebound Services". St. Joseph County Public Library. Retrieved November 26, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°37′N 86°17′W / 41.62°N 86.29°W / 41.62; -86.29