St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Burlington, New Jersey

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New St. Mary's Episcopal Church
BurlingtonNJ NewStMarysChurch 02.jpg
New St. Mary's Church
St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Burlington, New Jersey is located in Burlington County, New Jersey
St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Burlington, New Jersey
St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Burlington, New Jersey is located in New Jersey
St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Burlington, New Jersey
St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Burlington, New Jersey is located in the US
St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Burlington, New Jersey
Location

145 West Broad Street

Burlington, New Jersey
Coordinates 40°4′37″N 74°51′43″W / 40.07694°N 74.86194°W / 40.07694; -74.86194Coordinates: 40°4′37″N 74°51′43″W / 40.07694°N 74.86194°W / 40.07694; -74.86194
Area 6.2 acres (2.5 ha)
Built 1846-1854
Architect Richard Upjohn et al.
Architectural style Gothic Revival
NRHP reference # 72000770[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP May 31, 1972
Designated NHL June 24, 1986[2]

St. Mary's Episcopal Church is a historic Episcopal parish in Burlington, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. The original church was built in 1703 and was supplemented with a new church on adjacent land in 1854. On May 31, 1972, the new church was added to the National Register of Historic Places and on June 24, 1986, it was declared a National Historic Landmark. it is within the Burlington Historic District.

Old church[edit]

In 1695 settlers acquired land for a cemetery at West Broad and Wood streets and in 1702 the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts sent to missionaries to New Jersey. One of them, John Talbot, became rector of St. Mary's Church (built in 1703) in 1705.[3][4] It thus became the oldest Episcopal congregation in New Jersey.

As the congregation grew, parishioners decided to build a new church and commissioned Richard Upjohn to design it. In 1846, construction began on adjoining land at 145 West Broad Street. It was consecrated in 1854.

New church[edit]

New St. Mary's Church was constructed between 1846 and 1854. It is one of the earliest attempts in the United States to "follow a specific English medieval church model for which measured drawings existed." This Gothic Revival-style church was designed by Richard Upjohn, who modeled it after St. John's Church in Shottesbrooke, England. It helped firmly establish Upjohn as a practitioner of Gothic design.[1][5] It is a massive brownstone church with a long nave. The crossing is topped by a tall stone spire that has eight bells cast in England by Thomas Mears II at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry in 1865.[6] The church was designated a National Historic Landmark.

Gallery[edit]

Notable burials[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ "New St. Mary's Episcopal Church". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. 2008-06-23. Archived from the original on 2012-09-12.
  3. ^ James Thayer Addison, The Episcopal Church in the United States 1789-1931 Charles Scribner's Sons 1951 p. 47
  4. ^ Robert Wm. Duncan, Jr., "A Study of the Ministry of John Talbot in New Jersey, 1702-1727: On "Great Ripeness" Much Dedication, and Regrettable Failure" Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Sept. 1973), pp. 233-256
  5. ^ Churches of England
  6. ^ Intensive Level Architectural Survey, McCabe & Associates, 2002
  7. ^ New Jersey Governor Joseph Bloomfield Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine., National Governors Association. Accessed August 21, 2007.
  8. ^ Elias Boudinot, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 21, 2007.
  9. ^ George Washington Doane Archived 2008-05-20 at the Wayback Machine., Saint Mary's Episcopal Churchyard. Accessed August 21, 2007.
  10. ^ E. Burd Grubb Archived 2008-05-20 at the Wayback Machine., St. Mary's Churchyard. Accessed August 21, 2007.
  11. ^ James Kinsey, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 21, 2007.
  12. ^ Joseph McIlvaine, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 21, 2007.
  13. ^ William Milnor, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 15, 2007.
  14. ^ Isabel Paterson, Find A Grave. Accessed August 21, 2007.
  15. ^ John Howard Pugh, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 15, 2007.
  16. ^ Garret Dorset Wall, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 15, 2007.
  17. ^ James Walter Wall, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 15, 2007.

External links[edit]