St. Paul's Cathedral (Buffalo, New York)

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Saint Paul's Cathedral
StPaulsCathedralBuffalo1.jpg
Location139 Pearl Street, Buffalo, New York
Country United States
DenominationEpiscopal
WebsiteSt. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral
History
StatusParish church
Founded10 February 1817
Founder(s)Samuel Johnston
Dedicated22 October 1851
Consecrated22 October 1851
Architecture
Functional status"Active"
CompletedMay 1873
Construction costUS$160 thousand
Specifications
Height274 feet (83.5 m)
MaterialsMedina sandstone
St. Paul's Cathedral (Buffalo)
St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, N. Y (NYPL b12647398-66647).tiff
St. Paul's Cathedral, ca. 1900
St. Paul's Cathedral (Buffalo, New York) is located in New York
St. Paul's Cathedral (Buffalo, New York)
St. Paul's Cathedral (Buffalo, New York) is located in the United States
St. Paul's Cathedral (Buffalo, New York)
LocationBuffalo, NY
Coordinates42°52′57.6″N 78°52′34.95″W / 42.882667°N 78.8763750°W / 42.882667; -78.8763750Coordinates: 42°52′57.6″N 78°52′34.95″W / 42.882667°N 78.8763750°W / 42.882667; -78.8763750
Built1849–1851
ArchitectRichard Upjohn; Robert W. Gibson
Architectural styleGothic Revival
NRHP reference #73002298
87002600 (increase)[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHPMarch 1, 1973[1]
December 23, 1987 (increase)[1]
Designated NHLDecember 23, 1987 [2]

St. Paul's Cathedral is the cathedral of the Episcopal Diocese of Western New York and a landmark of downtown Buffalo, New York. The church sits on a triangular lot bounded by Church St., Pearl St., Erie St., and Main St.

History[edit]

In 1848, vestrymen of St. Paul's in Buffalo formed a building committee to erect a new stone church. Being familiar with architect Richard Upjohn's work through his recently completed Trinity Church in New York City, they desired no other architect for the job, and immediately engaged Upjohn for the commission.[3]

Major structural events:;[4][5][6][7]

  • 1849: construction started.
  • 1851: the cathedral was dedicated/consecrated.
  • 1870: the spires on top of the two towers were finished.
  • 1888: a fire caused by a natural gas explosion nearly destroyed the building.
  • 1890: the church reopened after undergoing a renovation overseen by Robert W. Gibson.

The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral in 1973. In 1987, the NRHP listing was revised as "St. Paul's Cathedral (Buffalo)" [8] and the property was further declared a U.S. National Historic Landmark.[2][9]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c National Park Service (2007-01-23). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ a b "St. Paul's Cathedral (Buffalo)". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved 2007-09-19.
  3. ^ Napora, James. "Saint Paul's Episcopal Church: 1849–1851". Retrieved 2014-09-04.
  4. ^ "Cultural Resource Information System (CRIS)" (Searchable database). New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2016-04-01. Note: This includes Cornelia E. Brooke (May 1972). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: St. Paul's Cathedral" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-04-01. and Accompanying four photographs
  5. ^ Carolyn Pitts (c. 1987). "National Register of Historic Places increase / National Historic Landmark Registration: St. Paul's Cathedral". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2009-06-14.
  6. ^ "Accompanying four photos".
  7. ^ LaChiusa, Chuck. "St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral". Retrieved 2011-05-25.
  8. ^ A new NRHP reference number was issued. The purpose of revision is not specifically known in this case, but NRHP listings are often revised to reflect boundary changes.
  9. ^ Carolyn Pitts (n.d.), National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: St. Paul's Cathedral (pdf), National Park Service and Accompanying 2 photos, from 1965 (368 KB)

External links[edit]