St Ebbe's Church, Oxford

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St Ebbe's Church
Norman period west door
Country United Kingdom
Denomination Church of England
Churchmanship Low Church / Conservative Evangelical
Website stebbes.org.uk
Administration
Parish St Ebbe's
Deanery Oxford
Archdeaconry Oxford
Diocese Oxford
Province Canterbury
Clergy
Rector Vaughan Roberts

St Ebbe's is a Church of England parish church in central Oxford. The church has a conservative evangelical tradition and participates in the Anglican Reform movement.[1] It has members from many nations, many of whom are students at Oxford University. The rector is Vaughan Roberts who is also an author and conference speaker.

History[edit]

The church stands on the site of one dedicated to St Æbbe before 1005. Most sources suggest that this was the Northumbrian St Æbbe of Coldingham,[2] but it has been suggested that Æbbe of Oxford was a different saint. The name was first recorded in about 1005 when the church was granted to Eynsham Abbey.[3]

The present church was built in 1814–16. It was enlarged and improved in 1866 and 1904. A Norman doorway of the 12th century has been restored and placed at the west end.[4] The church is the parish church for the parish of St Ebbes, a portion of which was demolished to make way for the nearby Westgate Shopping Centre in the 1970s. The church has a ministry among the remaining part of the parish, although most of its members live outside the parish. The church is a partner church of St Ebbe’s Primary School, a school within the parish.[5]

Former rectors include Thomas Valpy French (1874-7),[6] John Arkell, John Stansfeld (1912-1926),[7] Maurice Wood (1947–52),[8] Basil Gough (1952–64),[9] Keith Weston (1964–85)[10] and David Fletcher (1986–98).[11]

Sale of wooden chests - In 2010 the PCC of St Ebbe's in Oxford sold two wooden chests without the necessary permissions. One of these was one a rare 13th century elm coffer.[12] This action was challenged at a subsequent Consistory Court Hearing and the church took action to resolve the matter.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Coordinates: 51°45′02″N 1°15′35″W / 51.75056°N 1.25972°W / 51.75056; -1.25972