St Gabriel Fenchurch

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St Gabriel Fenchurch
Plaque opposite Cullum Street
Country England
Denomination Anglican

St Gabriel Fenchurch (or Fen Church as recorded on the Ordnance Survey) was a parish church in the Langbourn Ward of the City of London,[1] destroyed in the Great Fire of London and not rebuilt.

History[edit]

The church stood between Rood Lane and Mincing Lane.[2] At the beginning of the 17th century, John Stow wrote in his description of Fenchurch Street: "In the midst of this street standeth a small parish church called St Gabriel Fen Church, corruptly Fan church".[3] The dedication to St Gabriel is first recorded in 1517. Before that it had been known as St Mary's. Richard Newcourt wrote:

...this Church hath all along in the London Registry been recorded by the Name of S. Mary Fencherch, till the Year 1517. for then is the first time I find it there call'd by the Name of S. Gabriel Fencherch; and the next Year after All Saints Fencherch; whence, I conjecture, it may, probably, be dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, to the Holy Angel Gabriel, and to All Saints.[1]

The church was lengthened by nine feet in 1631. This and other improvements were done at a cost to the parish of £587 10s..[1] Thomas Clark, a glazier, gave the church an east window, with the Royal Arms and the motto "Touch Not Mine Anointed". [2]

Along with the majority of the parish churches in the City, St Gabriel's was destroyed by the Great Fire in 1666. A Rebuilding Act was passed in 1670 and a committee set up under Sir Christopher Wren.[4] It decided to rebuild 51 of the churches, but St Gabriel's was not among them.[5]Instead the parish was united to that of St Margaret Pattens[1] although its land holding was not finally resolved until 13 years later.[6] and charitable bequests continued to be made using the old name[7] The land on which the church had stood was incorporated into the roadway, but part of the churchyard survived in Fen Court.[2]

Notable tombs in the church included that of Benedict Spinola, the Elizabethan banker.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Newcourt, Richard (1708). Repetorium Ecclesiasticum Parochiale Londinense. London. pp. 350–1. 
  2. ^ a b c .White, James George (1901). The Churches and Chapels of Old London. London. pp. 49–50. 
  3. ^ Stow, John (1956). The Survey of London (revised ed.). London: J.M. Dent & Sons. p. 180. 
  4. ^ Whinney, Margaret (1971). Wren. London: Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-20112-9. 
  5. ^ "The City of London Churches" Betjeman, J. Andover, Pitkin, 1967 (rpnt 1992) ISBN 0-85372-565-9
  6. ^ "Deeds and documents concerning nos. 143-149 Fenchurch Street (north side) 1679." - v185779x cited in City of London Parish Registers Guide 4 Hallows,A.(Ed) : London, Guildhall Library Research, 1974 ISBN 0-900422-30-0
  7. ^ The Endowed Charities of the City of London,1829
  8. ^ John Bennell, Spinola, Benedict (1519/20–1580) in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004), online ed., January 2008, accessed 21 December 2010 (subscription required)

51°30′39″N 0°4′54″W / 51.51083°N 0.08167°W / 51.51083; -0.08167Coordinates: 51°30′39″N 0°4′54″W / 51.51083°N 0.08167°W / 51.51083; -0.08167