St Pancras, Soper Lane

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St Pancras, Soper Lane[1]
Pancras Lane site of St Pancras Soper Lane.JPG
Current photo of site
Country United Kingdom
Denomination Anglican, originally Roman Catholic

St Pancras, Soper Lane, was a parish church in the City of London, in England. Of medieval origin, it was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt.

History[edit]

St Pancras, Soper Lane, was the Ward of Cheap, City of London.[2] The street from which it took its name was renamed after the Great Fire,[3] although sources vary as to whether it became Queen Street[3] or Pancras Lane.[4] The church was first built in the twelfth century.[5] It was a small building, with a tower containing five bells. There was a chapel on the north side.[5]

Though small, the parish had some wealthy residents, and the church received various benefactions.[4] In 1617 it was presented with a monument commemorating Elizabeth I.[5] by Thomas Chapman. In 1621 the renovation of the building was financed by a group of benefactors, including Chapman, and a porch was added in 1624, paid for by Chapman's son.[4]

The patronage of the church belonged to the prior and chapter of Christ Church, Canterbury, until 1365, when they granted it to the Archbishop of Canterbury.[3] There was a parsonage house on the corner of Pancras Lane and Queen Street; in 1670 it was leased out for 40 years, at an annual rent of £2.[4]

Destruction[edit]

Along with the majority of churches in the City, St Pancras, Soper Lane, was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in September 1666.[6] It was not rebuilt; instead the parish was united with those of St Mary-le-Bow and All Hallows, Honey Lane. The rebuilt St Mary-le-Bow served as the church for the united parishes, and the site of St Pancras was retained as a graveyard.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ St. Pancras Soper Lane 145/0: The parish church of St. Pancras Soper Lane', Historical gazetteer of London before the Great Fire: Cheapside; parishes of All Hallows Honey Lane, St Martin Pomary, St Mary le Bow, St Mary Colechurch and St Pancras Soper Lane (1987), pp. 639-644. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=9775. Date accessed: 12 July 2008.
  2. ^ 'Cheape warde', A Survey of London, by John Stow: Reprinted from the text of 1603 (1908), pp. 258-276.
  3. ^ a b c d Newcourt, Richard (1708). Repetorium Ecclesiasticum Parochiale Londinense. 1. London. pp. 517–8. 
  4. ^ a b c d Seymour, Robert (1733). A Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster, Borough of Southwark, and Parts Adjacent. 1. London: T. Read. pp. 529–30. 
  5. ^ a b c White, J.G. (1901). The Churches and Chapels of Old London. London. pp. 152–8. 
  6. ^ Reynolds, H. (1922). The "Churches of the City of London. London: Bodley Head. 

51°30′47.5″N 0°5′31″W / 51.513194°N 0.09194°W / 51.513194; -0.09194Coordinates: 51°30′47.5″N 0°5′31″W / 51.513194°N 0.09194°W / 51.513194; -0.09194

Further reading[edit]

  • An ACTUAL SURVEY of the Parish of ST. PANCRAS Soper Lane in the City of LONDON. Taken in the Year 1791, by Richd. Wooding Architect & Surveyor. Princes St. Spittal Fields.