St Paul's Church, Hooton

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St Paul's Church, Childer Thorton
St Paul's Church, Hooton.jpg
West face of St Paul's Church, Hooton.jpg
St Paul's Church, Childer Thorton is located in Cheshire
St Paul's Church, Childer Thorton
St Paul's Church, Childer Thorton
Location in Cheshire
Coordinates: 53°17′26″N 2°57′03″W / 53.2906°N 2.9509°W / 53.2906; -2.9509
OS grid reference SJ 367 775
Location Hooton, Cheshire
Country England
Denomination Anglican
Website St Paul, Hooton
Architecture
Heritage designation Grade II
Designated 17 May 1985
Architect(s) James K. Colling
Architectural type Church
Style Romanesque Revival,
Gothic Revival
Groundbreaking 1858
Completed 1862
Construction cost £5,000
Specifications
Materials Red and white stone
Slate roofs
Administration
Parish St Paul, Hooton
Deanery Wirral South
Archdeaconry Chester
Diocese Chester
Province York
Clergy
Vicar(s) Revd Keith Howard

St Paul's Church is in the village of Hooton, Cheshire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Wirral South, the archdeaconry of Chester, and the diocese of Chester.[1] The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.[2] The authors of the Buildings of England series describe it as "unquestionably one of the most spectacular churches of Cheshire".[3]

History[edit]

The church was built between 1858 and 1862 to a design by James K. Colling for the Liverpool banker R. C. Naylor at a cost of £5,000 (equivalent to £430,000 in 2016).[3][4]

Architecture[edit]

Exterior[edit]

St Paul's is constructed in a mixture of red and white ashlar stone and red rock-faced stone.[3] The roofs are slated. The plan of the church is cruciform.[2] It consists of a three-bay nave, north and south aisles, north and south transepts, a chancel with north and south aisles continuing as an ambulatory, a west porch and a south porch. Above the crossing is the base of a dome rising from pendentives surmounted by a lantern with a short spire. Above the south porch is a detached belfry spire. The west porch is Romanesque in style, and above it is a rose window. Some of the other windows in the church are Romanesque, while others have pointed arches with plate tracery.[2][3]

Interior[edit]

Inside the church the arcades are carried on Peterhead granite, with capitals in French Early Gothic style. The font is made from dark green serpentine. It dates from 1851, and gained a medal at the Great Exhibition that year.[2][3] The stained glass includes windows by Heaton, Butler and Bayne, Clayton and Bell, and Kempe.[3] The two manual organ was built by Rushworth and Dreaper.[5]

External features[edit]

The churchyard contains the war graves of five World War II airmen, four British and one Australian.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ St Paul, Hooton, Church of England, retrieved 6 May 2011 
  2. ^ a b c d Historic England, "Church of St Paul, including south-west boundary wall and gates, Hooton (1115407)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 October 2013 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Hartwell, Claire; Hyde, Matthew; Hubbard, Edward; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2011) [1971], Cheshire, The Buildings of England, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, p. 403, ISBN 978-0-300-17043-6 
  4. ^ UK Consumer Price Index inflation figures are based on data from Clark, Gregory (2017). "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved November 6, 2017. 
  5. ^ Cheshire (Merseyside), Hooton, St. Paul (N04365), British Institute of Organ Studies, retrieved 23 September 2011 
  6. ^ HOOTON (ST. PAUL) CHURCHYARD, Commonwealth War Graves Commission, retrieved 3 February 2013