Stadacona

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the 16th-century village. For the building in Ottawa, see Stadacona Hall. For the naval ship, see HMCS Stadacona. For the stone frigate, see CFB Halifax#Stadacona. For the seat in the Canadian Senate, see List of Quebec senators#Stadacona.

Stadacona was a 16th-century St. Lawrence Iroquoian village near present-day Quebec City.

French explorer and navigator Jacques Cartier, travelling and charting the Saint Lawrence River, reached it during July 1534. [1] At the time, the chief of the village was Donnacona. Despite efforts by the people of the village, Cartier seized some inhabitants and their chief[2] but later released Donnacona and he agreed for his two sons, Taignoagny and Domagaya, [3] to return with Cartier to France for a year. [4]

Cartier returned with Lord Donnacona’s sons on his next voyage in 1535-1536 where he recorded a word they had used to refer to their home: “They call a town, Canada”. [5] When he and his crew stayed during the winter, they were effectively saved by the Stadaconans who knew how to prepare for them a vitamin-rich broth as a cure for scurvy which had already killed a quarter of Cartier’s crew. [6] The same winter more than 50 Iroquois of the village died from diseases carried by the Europeans. [7] After this, Cartier seized Donnacona, his sons, and seven other inhabitants and took them back to France where nine of the ten would die and none would ever return. [8] Five years later Cartier would come back to Stadacona, but was not welcomed by the Stadaconans. [9] Samuel de Champlain later chose the location of this village to establish the colony of l'Habitation, the start of the settlement of Quebec.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Conrad Margaret, Finkel Alvin, Jaenen Cornelius. History of the Canadian Peoples: Beginnings to 1867. Mississauga: Copp Clark Pitman. 1993, p. 92.
  2. ^ Nelles H.V.. “A Little History of Canada”. Don Mills, Ontario. 2005, p. 20.
  3. ^ Francis Douglas, Jones Richard, Smith Donald B.. “Journeys: A History of Canada”. Toronto, Ontario. Thomson Nelson. 2006, p. 27.
  4. ^ Conrad Margaret, Finkel Alvin, Jaenen Cornelius. History of the Canadian Peoples: Beginnings to 1867. Mississauga: Copp Clark Pitman. 1993, p. 92.
  5. ^ Francis Douglas, Jones Richard, Smith Donald B.. “Journeys: A History of Canada”. Toronto, Ontario. Thomson Nelson. 2006, p. 27.
  6. ^ Francis Douglas, Jones Richard, Smith Donald B.. “Journeys: A History of Canada”. Toronto, Ontario. Thomson Nelson. 2006, p. 27.
  7. ^ Nelles H.V.. “A Little History of Canada”. Don Mills, Ontario. 2005, p. 20.
  8. ^ Conrad Margaret, Finkel Alvin, Jaenen Cornelius. History of the Canadian Peoples: Beginnings to 1867. Mississauga: Copp Clark Pitman. 1993, p. 93.
  9. ^ Conrad Margaret, Finkel Alvin, Jaenen Cornelius. History of the Canadian Peoples: Beginnings to 1867. Mississauga: Copp Clark Pitman. 1993, p. 93.

See also[edit]

Coordinates: 46°49′28″N 71°14′36.4″W / 46.82444°N 71.243444°W / 46.82444; -71.243444