Stafford, Virginia

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Stafford Courthouse
Census-designated place (CDP)
Stafford Virginia, a view from Courthouse Road
Stafford Virginia, a view from Courthouse Road
Location in Stafford County and the state of Virginia.
Location in Stafford County and the state of Virginia.
Coordinates: 38°25′19″N 77°24′30″W / 38.42194°N 77.40833°W / 38.42194; -77.40833Coordinates: 38°25′19″N 77°24′30″W / 38.42194°N 77.40833°W / 38.42194; -77.40833
Country  United States
Commonwealth  Virginia
County Stafford
Area
 • Total 4.27 sq mi (11.07 km2)
Population (2010)
 • Total 4,320
 • Density 1,000/sq mi (390/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 22554, 22556
Website Official website for the County

Stafford is a census-designated place (listed as Stafford Courthouse) in and the county seat of Stafford County in the northern part of the U.S. Commonwealth of Virginia.[1] The population as of the 2010 United States Census was 4,320. It lies 10 miles (16 km) north of Fredericksburg, approximately 40 miles (64 km) south of metropolitan Washington, D.C., and about 60 miles (97 km) north of Richmond, the Commonwealth capital.[2][full citation needed] The Marine Corps Base Quantico is located north of the community. Stafford Courthouse is located at the intersections of U.S. Highway 1, and Courthouse Road.

History[edit]

English sea captain Samuel Argall abducted the Pamunkey princess Pocahontas near this area on April 13, 1613 while she was residing with her Patawomeck husband, Kocoum in an attempt to secure some English prisoners for release and ammunition held by her father. It occurred in the northeastern part of this county, from where the colonists took her to a secondary English settlement, known as Henricus (or Henrico Town). The vicar, Alexander Whitaker converted Pocahontas to Christianity during her captivity. He renamed her "Rebecca" at her baptism. Rebecca married English colonist John Rolfe on April 5, 1614 in Jamestown.[3][4]

Accokeek Furnace Archeological Site, Public Quarry at Government Island, Redoubt No. 2, and Stafford Training School are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[5]

Aquia Harbor Church[edit]

Aquia Church, located right outside of Aquia Harbor in Stafford, Virginia, has become infamous for its apparent hauntings.

The church was built in the 1700’s apparent from the aged tombstones dating back to the 1730’s. The church was active during the Revolutionary War, but was closed due to lack of funding. When the church was opened again, a murdered woman’s body was found in the belfry. Some stories include the woman being a runway from highway men, the body being found by a child, and even the woman being named “Blond Beth.” This coincides with reports of a young, blonde woman being seen in windows, the sounds of a struggle, and footsteps heard running. When the woman was murdered isn’t elaborated upon, but the general concenscious is long before the church was re-opened. Stories tell of only a skeleton being found and the blood being stained into the wood floorsHaunted Commonwealth, suggesting the corpse spent a great deal of time in the belfry. This story spread and led to a series of people trying to prove the church was somehow haunted. One story involves a man dared by his friends to hammer a nail into the belfry to prove he was brave enough. The man wasn’t seen the rest of the night, and was found nailed to onto the wall the next day. While these legends are still well known, the stories have mainly moved to word of mouth tales shared by residents in the Aquia community.

Besides word of mouth, many online blogs have comment boards of residents sharing their stories of hauntings that have happened inside Aquia Church.Haunted Places [Haunted Stories]] The stories all have common themes such as unexplained screaming, uneasy feelings and flickering lights, either from the lampposts in the driveway or lightbulbs inside the church. Almost every tale mentions seeing a woman in a window, often accompanied with a red light. The pastor of the church Rev. Jay Morris even acknowledged the hauntings, and when asked to allow an investigation, turned it down. Other employers of the church also seem skeptical of the hauntings, and have posted evidence against the claims of ghosts and eerie feelings. The church’s loitering policy reflects its low tolerance of its reputation, as one user commented that each time they’ve tried to investigate the Church, the police have arrived. Whether or not this church is actually haunted is still only rumors, though it has become a staple in the Stafford community.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Stafford County, VA". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 10 January 2013. 
  2. ^ Connor, 2003
  3. ^ John Rolfe Highway Marker
  4. ^ Kidnapping of Pocahontas Highway Marker or Pocahontas Highway Marker
  5. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 

External links[edit]