Stafford Hollow, Connecticut

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Stafford Hollow Historic District
Stafford Town House 1845.jpg
Stafford Town House
Stafford Hollow, Connecticut is located in Connecticut
Stafford Hollow, Connecticut
Stafford Hollow, Connecticut is located in the US
Stafford Hollow, Connecticut
Location Roughly parts of Leonard, Murphy, Old Monson, Orcuttville, & Patten Rds., Stafford, Connecticut
Coordinates 41°59′8″N 72°17′26″W / 41.98556°N 72.29056°W / 41.98556; -72.29056Coordinates: 41°59′8″N 72°17′26″W / 41.98556°N 72.29056°W / 41.98556; -72.29056
Architectural style Colonial Revival, Greek Revival, Late Victorian
NRHP Reference # 87002032[1]
Added to NRHP October 15, 1987

Stafford Hollow, also known as Stafford, Stafford Village, or Furnace Hollow, is a village in the town of Stafford, in Tolland County, Connecticut, located at the junction of Route 19 and Route 319. Stafford Hollow was the town center of Stafford during the 18th and 19th centuries, before the growth of the village of Stafford Springs.[2]

A 0.26-square-mile (0.67 km2) area of the village has been designated a historic district, the Stafford Hollow Historic District, which includes Colonial Revival, Greek Revival, and Late Victorian architecture.[2][3] Twentieth-century houses on the roads radiating away from the village center are not included in the historic district.

As early as 1779, Stafford Hollow was the site of a blast furnace, known as Phelps blast furnace, that processed bog iron ores. The Phelps furnace is reputed to have produced cannon and cannonballs, kettles, and pots for use by the Continental Army. It operated until 1840, when the local ore supply had been used up.[4]

Stafford Hollow Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1987.[1][3] The historic district includes five of the Town of Stafford's most significant buildings.[2]:16 The district includes the Pinney School building, a Queen Anne style structure from 1895.[2]:11 It includes the Valley Cotton Mill site, now ruins, which was destroyed in 1900.[2]:13

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Bruce Clouette; Matthew Roth; Robert Griffith & John Herzan (October 27, 1986). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Stafford Hollow Historic District" (PDF). National Park Service.  and Accompanying 30 photos, from 1985
  3. ^ a b Connecticut National Register of Historic Places, Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism, Historic Preservation and Museum Division
  4. ^ Charles Rufus Harte (1944), Connecticut's Iron and Copper, Part I, from the 60th Annual Report of the Connecticut Society of Civil Engineers, 1944