Stafford Springs, Connecticut

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Stafford Springs
Census-designated place
The Holt Memorial Fountain circa. 1910
The Holt Memorial Fountain circa. 1910
Coordinates: 41°57′12″N 72°18′11″W / 41.9534°N 72.3030°W / 41.9534; -72.3030Coordinates: 41°57′12″N 72°18′11″W / 41.9534°N 72.3030°W / 41.9534; -72.3030
Country  United States
State  Connecticut
Town Stafford
Website staffordct.org

Stafford Springs is a census-designated place located in Stafford, Connecticut. The population was 4,988 at the 2010 Census.[1] The village was a borough until November 1991, when it was disincorporated.[2]

Located on the mouth of the Willimantic River,[3] the mill industry grew in the town due to its location and became the largest industry in the area.[4] The village has the Holt Memorial Fountain and the former railroad station.[5]

In the 18th century, the spring at Stafford Springs was famous for its reputed ability to cure "the gout, sterility, pulmonary, hysterics, etc."[6] In 1771, John Adams, then a young lawyer, visited Stafford Springs for several days after suffering from overwork and anxiety.[6]

Stafford Springs was once the headquarters of Station C of the Connecticut State Police, and subsequently was the site of the Troop C Barracks.[7]

Currently Route 32, Route 190, Route 19, and Route 140 pass through or originate in the village.[8]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 2,640
1910 3,059 15.9%
1920 3,383 10.6%
1930 3,492 3.2%
1940 3,401 −2.6%
1950 3,396 −0.1%
1960 3,322 −2.2%
1970 3,339 0.5%
1980 3,392 1.6%
1990 4,100 20.9%
2010 4,988

References[edit]

  1. ^ "American FactFinder - Community Facts: Stafford Springs, Connecticut". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-11-25. 
  2. ^ 1992 Census of Wholesale Trade: Geographic Area Series, Connecticut. U.S. Census Bureau. 1994. p. Appendix F: Geographic Notes. 
  3. ^ "Stafford". connecticuthistory.org. Connecticut Humanities. Retrieved 2016-11-25. 
  4. ^ "About Stafford, Connecticut: History". Town of Stafford. Retrieved 2016-11-25. 
  5. ^ "Holt Memorial Fountain, Stafford Springs". CTMonuments.net. Retrieved 2016-11-25. 
  6. ^ a b Frank Chapelle, Wellsprings: A Natural History of Bottled Spring Waters (Rutgers University Press, 2005), pp. 107-08.
  7. ^ Jerry Longo, Images of America: Connecticut State Police (Arcadia Publishing: 2003), p. 2.
  8. ^ "Highway Log Connecticut State Numbered Routes and Roads" (PDF). ct.gov/dot. Connecticut Department of Transportation. December 31, 2014. Retrieved November 27, 2016. 

External links[edit]