Stan Corrigan

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Stan Corrigan
Member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly
for Port Melbourne
In office
15 March 1952 – 22 April 1955
Preceded by Tom Corrigan
Succeeded by Archie Todd
Personal details
Born Stanislaus Terence Corrigan
(1916-10-17)17 October 1916
South Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Died 7 July 1964(1964-07-07) (aged 47)
Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia
Political party Labor Party
Spouse(s)
Matilda Semmens (m. 2018)
Relatives Tom Corrigan (father)
Occupation Electrical Contractor

Stanislaus Terence "Stan" Corrigan (17 October 1916 – 7 June 1964) was an Australian politician.

Born in South Melbourne to Tom Corrigan and Emily Olive Angleton, he was educated at Christian Brothers' College (Albert Park) and completed his apprenticeship as an Electrical Contractor with his brother Thomas Corrigan Jnr. On 17 March 1945 he married Matilda Semmens, with whom he had two children. He worked for his brother's business before becoming treasurer of the Melbourne branch of the Amalgamated Engineering Union and secretary of the Port Melbourne branch of the Labor Party, as well as campaign secretary to Jack Holloway and Frank Crean. In 1952 he was elected to the Victorian Legislative Assembly in a by-election for the seat of Port Melbourne, replacing his father who had died in January. In 1955 he joined the breakaway Australian Labor Party (Anti-Communist) and was defeated at that year's state election.[1] He then ran against his former boss, Holloway, in the federal election held later that year and lost. Corrigan died at Fitzroy in 1964.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ainsley Symons (2012), 'Democratic Labor Party members in the Victorian Parliament of 1955-1958,' in Recorder (Australian Society for the Study of Labour History, Melbourne Branch) No. 275, November, Pages 4-5.
  2. ^ "Corrigan, Stanislaus Terence". Parliament of Victoria. 1985. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
Victorian Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Tom Corrigan
Member for Port Melbourne
1952–1955
Succeeded by
Archie Todd