Stan Tatkin

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Stanley Joseph Tatkin
Stan Tatkin.jpg
BornNovember 4, 1954
Los Angeles, California
NationalityAmerican
Education
  • Doctor of Clinical Psychology
  • Masters of Clinical Psychology
  • Marriage and Family Therapy
Alma materAntioch University, Los Angeles Ryokan College
Occupation
  • Psychogist
  • Researcher
  • Author
  • Public Speaker
  • Therapist
Notable work
Wired for Love, We Do
Spouse(s)Tracey Boldeman-Tatkin, Ph.D.

Stan Tatkin, PsyD, MFT, is a clinician, researcher, teacher, and developer of A Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy® (PACT[1]).  

PACT is a polytheoretical, non-linear approach to dyadic systems that integrates developmental neuroscience, arousal regulation, and attachment theory. Psychobiology centers on early attachment and its effect on the developing brain and autonomic nervous system.[1] PACT encourages partners to adopt secure-functioning principles of behavior apart from their actual attachment organization.[2]

Tatkin created the PACT Institute in 2010 with his wife, Tracey Boldemann-Tatkin, PhD, to train mental health professionals to think and work through a psychobiological lens in their clinical practice. Tatkin’s work, based on a social-emotional capacity model, focuses on what partners can and cannot do to mitigate threat reactions during stressful interactive sequences. The clinician pays particular attention to each partner’s moment-by-moment implicit and explicit behaviors, such as microexpressions, micromovements, and other non-verbal and verbal cues. Sessions are commonly video recorded, and portions may be played back to the couple for feedback and interpretation. Video recorded sessions may also be examined by the clinician for post-inquiry and research by means of digital frame analysis in order to study a couple’s behavior more precisely. The goal of the PACT Institute is to help couples and individuals reduce interpersonal stress and threat consequences through secure-functioning principles of fairness, justice, sensitivity, collaboration, and cooperation. Through the PACT Institute, Tatkin has trained thousands of therapists to integrate PACT into clinical practice throughout the U.S., Canada, England, Norway, Turkey, Australia, and Spain.[1] He also co-leads Wired for Love Couple Retreats[3] with his wife, Tracey.  

Tatkin’s clinical practice is in Calabasas, California. He teaches and supervises family medicine residents at Kaiser Permanente, Woodland Hills, California, and is an associate clinical professor at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine.  

Tatkin is known for integrating various theories and models to form the foundation of the comprehensive principles and methodologies he teaches. As a result, the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, California, honored Tatkin with the Educator of the Year award 2014.[4]

Tatkin is on the board of directors of Lifespan Learning Institute and serves as a member on the Relationships First Advisory Board, a nonprofit organization founded by Harville Hendrix and Helen LaKelly Hunt.[5]

Biography[edit]

Tatkin studied at Antioch University Los Angeles, where he earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees. He received his Psy.D in clinical psychology from Ryokan College in 1994. Tatkin received his early training in developmental self and object relations (Masterson Institute), Gestalt, psychodrama, and family systems theory. His private practice specialized for some time in treating adolescents and adults with personality disorders. More recently, his interests turned to psycho-neurobiological theories of human relationship and applying principles of early mother-infant attachment to adult romantic relationships.

Tatkin was a primary inpatient group therapist at the John Bradshaw Center, where among other things, he taught mindfulness to patients and staff. He was trained in vipassana meditation by Shinzen Young, PhD, and became an experienced facilitator. He was also trained by David Reynolds, PhD, in two Japanese forms of psychotherapy, Morita and Naikan.  

Tatkin was clinical director of Charter Hospital’s intensive outpatient drug and alcohol program. Trained in self and object relations for working with personality disorders through the Masterson Institute, he specialized early in his career as a clinician in treating adolescents and adults with personality disorders and drug and alcohol addiction. A former president of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, Ventura County chapter, he is a veteran member of Allan N. Schore’s study group. He also trained in the Adult Attachment Interview by way of Mary Main and Erik Hesse’s program through UC Berkeley. He was also trained in Paul Ekman’s Facial Action Coding System by Erika Rosenberg.  

Stan and Tracey leading a Wired for Love Retreat at Shambhala Mountain Center

A Psychobiological Approach[edit]

Tatkin developed A Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy (PACT).[1]

PACT developed out of research in three areas: neuroscience, attachment theory and biology of human arousal. [6])  

The PACT Institute[edit]

The PACT Institute maintains responsibility for this program and its content. 

PACT Couple Sessions[edit]

A PACT couple session may differ somewhat from what clinicians and couples experience in other forms of couple therapy.[7] Key features of this approach include:

  • A PACT therapist’s focus on moment-to-moment shifts in a client’s face, body, and voice, and each partner’s active involvement in paying close attention to these as a couple.
  • A PACT therapist creates experiences similar to those troubling a relationship and helps the couple work through them in real time during the session.
  • PACT tends to require fewer sessions than do other forms of couple therapy.
  • PACT sessions often exceed the 50-minute hour and may last as long as 3–6 hours. Longer times allow for the in-depth work of PACT.
  • A PACT therapist may videotape sessions to provide a couple with immediate feedback.

Publications[edit]

Books, CDs[edit]

  • Hoppe, K., & Tatkin, S. (2021). Baby Bomb: A Relationship Survival Guide for New Parents, Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications. ISBN 168403731X.
  • Tatkin, S. (2018). We Do: Saying Yes to a Relationship of Depth, True Connection, and Enduring Love. Colorado: Sounds True. ISBN 1622038932.
  • Tatkin, S. (2018). The Relationship Rx: Insights and Practices to Overcome Chronic Fighting and Return to Love. [Audio book.] Colorado: Sounds True. ISBN 1683640004.
  • Tatkin, S. (2017). How Couples Change: a psychobiological approach to couple therapy (PACT). In M. Solomon & D. J. Siegel (Eds.), How People Change: Relationships and Neuroplasticity in Psychotherapy (pp. 320). New York, New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  • Tatkin, S. (2016). Wired for Dating: How understanding neurobiology and attachment style can help you find your ideal mate. Oakland, California: New Harbinger Publications. ISBN 162625303X.
  • Tatkin, S. (2016). Wired for Dating: How understanding neurobiology and attachment style can help you find your ideal mate. (Simplified Characters: N. Chang, Trans.) Jiangxi Education Publishing House Co.  
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Your Brain on Love: The neurobiology of healthy relationships. [Audio, 6-CD set] Louisville, CO: Sounds True. ISBN 1604079681.
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Wired for Love: How understanding your partner's brain and attachment style can help you defuse conflicts and build a secure relationship. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications. ISBN 1608820580.
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Wired for Love: How understanding your partner's brain and attachment style can help you defuse conflicts and build a secure relationship. Prague, Czech Republic. Synergie Publishing.  
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Wired for Love: How understanding your partner's brain and attachment style can help you defuse conflicts and build a secure relationship. (M. Hidalgo, Trans.). Granada, Spain. Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial, Mexico. ASIN BOIFYKCCS.
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Wired for Love: How understanding your partner's brain and attachment style can help you defuse conflicts and build a secure relationship. Bucharest, Romania. Editura Herald: S.C. V & I Herald Grup. ISBN 9731115420.
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Wired for Love: How understanding your partner's brain and attachment style can help you defuse conflicts and build a secure relationship. Istanbul, Turkey. Okuyan Us Publishing. ISBN 6058031486.
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Wired for Love: How understanding your partner's brain and attachment style can help you defuse conflicts and build a secure relationship. Warsaw, Poland. Institute of Health Psychology, Polish Psych Association. ISBN 8360747792.
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Wired for Love: How understanding your partner's brain and attachment style can help you defuse conflicts and build a secure relationship. (Simplified Characters: N. Chang, Trans.). NanChang City, JiangXi Province, China. Jiangxi Education Publishing House Co.  
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Wired for Love: How understanding your partner's brain and attachment style can help you defuse conflicts and build a secure relationship.  (Traditional Chinese). Taipei. Acorn Publishing.  
  • Tatkin, S. (2012). Wired for Love: How understanding your partner's brain and attachment style can help you defuse conflicts and build a secure relationship. Moscow, Russia. Mann, Ivanov, and Ferber. 
  • Solomon, M., & Tatkin, S. (2010). Love and War in Intimate Relationships: Connection, disconnection, and mutual regulation in couple therapy. New York: Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology, W. W. Norton. ISBN 0393705757.

Journals[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "The PACT Institute". www.thepactinstitute.com. Retrieved 2020-11-09.
  2. ^ "Stan Tatkin on Psychobiological Couples Therapy". www.psychotherapy.net. Retrieved 2020-11-09.
  3. ^ "Retreats". www.thepactinstitute.com. Retrieved 2020-11-09.
  4. ^ "AAMFT-CA Fundraiser | American Association for Marriage & Family Therapy – California Division". web.archive.org. 2014-05-20. Retrieved 2020-11-09.
  5. ^ "Initiatives". Harville and Helen. Retrieved 2020-11-09.
  6. ^ "The Couple Bubble according to Stan Tatkin". Exploring your mind. 2020-04-01. Retrieved 2020-11-10.
  7. ^ "What is PACT". www.thepactinstitute.com. Retrieved 2020-11-10.

External links[edit]