Coolidge Cricket Ground

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Stanford Cricket Ground)
Jump to: navigation, search
Coolidge Cricket Ground
Sticky Wicket Stadium
Stanfordcricketground.JPG
Ground information
Location Osbourn, Saint George, Antigua
Establishment 2004
Capacity 5,000
Operator Government of Antigua and Barbuda
End names
Pavilion End
Airport Road End
Team information
Leeward Islands (2001/02–2008/09)
Antigua Barracuda FC (2011–2012)
As of 18 March 2014
Source: [1]

The Coolidge Cricket Ground, colloquially known as "Sticky Wicket Stadium", is a cricket ground in Osbourn, Saint George Parish, Antigua. It was previously known as the Airport Cricket Ground, before it was taken over by American businessman and cricket enthusiast Allen Stanford, rebuilt in 2004 and named the Stanford Cricket Ground. It was used as one of the many home grounds of the Leeward Islands and also hosted many Twenty20 matches, including both the 2006 & 2008 Stanford 20/20 tournaments and the 2008 Stanford Super Series. Its name was changed to the Coolidge Cricket Ground in 2016-17 and it resumed staging cricket matches after an eight-year hiatus.

In early 2009 Allen Stanford became the subject of several fraud investigations. On 17 February 2009 he was charged by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) with fraud and multiple violations of U.S. securities laws for alleged "massive ongoing fraud" involving $7 billion in certificates of deposit. Ten days later the SEC amended its complaint to describe the alleged fraud as a "massive Ponzi scheme".[1] On 6 March 2012 Stanford was convicted on all charges except a single count of wire fraud,[2] and was sentenced to 110 years in prison.

The stadium also hosted football matches for Antigua Barracuda FC of USL Pro from 2011 to 2012.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Driver, Anna (February 27, 2009). "U.S. charges Stanford with massive Ponzi scheme". Thomson Reuters. Reuters. Archived from the original on March 1, 2009. Retrieved 18 March 2014. 
  2. ^ "Texas tycoon found guilty in $7B Ponzi scheme". CBS News. Retrieved 18 March 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 17°08′27.45″N 61°47′41.13″W / 17.1409583°N 61.7947583°W / 17.1409583; -61.7947583