Stanley, Idaho

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Stanley, Idaho
Stanley in June 2009
Stanley in June 2009
Location of Stanley in Custer County, Idaho.
Location of Stanley in Custer County, Idaho.
Coordinates: 44°13′0″N 114°56′16″W / 44.21667°N 114.93778°W / 44.21667; -114.93778Coordinates: 44°13′0″N 114°56′16″W / 44.21667°N 114.93778°W / 44.21667; -114.93778
CountryUnited States
StateIdaho
CountyCuster
Government
 • MayorHerb Mumford
Area
 • Total0.55 sq mi (1.42 km2)
 • Land0.54 sq mi (1.41 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.01 km2)
Elevation
6,253 ft (1,906 m)
Population
 • Total63
 • Estimate 
(2019)[3]
69
 • Density127.07/sq mi (49.10/km2)
Time zoneUTC-7 (Mountain
MST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-6 (MDT)
ZIP code
83278
Area code(s)208
FIPS code16-76780
GNIS feature ID0398179
Websitewww.stanley.id.gov

Stanley is a town in Custer County, Idaho, United States. The population was 63 at the 2010 census; down from 100 in 2000. The center of population of Idaho in 2000 was located in Stanley.[4]

History

Fur trappers of the Hudson's Bay Company discovered the Stanley Basin in the 1820s, but it was mostly avoided due to scarcity of beaver. Captain John Stanley, a Confederate Civil War veteran, led a party of prospectors through the area in 1863 (or 1864), but they found little gold and moved on and discovered the Atlanta lode on the south end of the Sawtooths. The site was not considered a town until 1919 when its streets and lots were surveyed and recorded.[5]

Stanley has long been a gathering place for the sparsely populated region.[6]

In 2005, Hannah Stouts won the city's mayoral election at age 22 to become the state's youngest elected mayor.[7]

The 2017 solar eclipse attracted a large number of visitors to Stanley and surrounding areas. The Milky Way is clearly visible in Stanley, and the town has sought the seal of approval from the International Dark-Sky Association.[8][9][10]

Geography

Stanley is located at 44°13′0″N 114°56′16″W / 44.21667°N 114.93778°W / 44.21667; -114.93778 (44.216698, -114.937814),[11] at an elevation of 6,253 feet (1,906 m) above sea level [12]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.62 square miles (1.61 km2), of which, 0.61 square miles (1.58 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[13] Stanley is surrounded by the Sawtooth National Recreation Area.

Major highways

  • SH-21 - Ponderosa Pine Scenic Byway[14]
  • SH-75 - Sawtooth Scenic Byway[15] (southbound), Salmon River Scenic Byway[16] (northbound)

2020 earthquake

On March 31, 2020 at 5:48 MST, a M 6.5 earthquake 20 miles northwest of Stanley shook the town.[17] This was the second strongest earthquake ever recorded in Idaho.[18]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
195033
1960356.1%
19704734.3%
198099110.6%
199071−28.3%
200010040.8%
201063−37.0%
2019 (est.)69[3]9.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[19]

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 63 people, 30 households, and 13 families living in the city. The population density was 103.3 inhabitants per square mile (39.9/km2). There were 91 housing units at an average density of 149.2 per square mile (57.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 100.0% White.

There were 30 households, of which 3.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.0% were married couples living together, 3.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 56.7% were non-families. 40.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.73 and the average family size was 2.23.

The median age in the city was 52.5 years. 3.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 1.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.8% were from 25 to 44; 58.7% were from 45 to 64; and 12.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 52.4% male and 47.6% female.

2000 census

As of the census[20] of 2000, there were 100 people, 45 households, and 23 families living in the city. The population density was 161.0 people per square mile (62.3/km2). There were 77 housing units at an average density of 124.0 per square mile (48.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.00% White, 1.00% Native American, and 1.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.00% of the population.

Salmon River & Sawtooths
from Lower Stanley in June 2008

There were 45 households, out of which 24.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.1% were married couples living together, 2.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.7% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and none had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 24.0% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 40.0% from 45 to 64, and 3.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 122.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 123.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,813, and the median income for a family was $45,625. Males had a median income of $25,000 versus $37,500 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,303. There were 25.9% of families and 21.4% of the population living below the poverty line, including 47.1% of those under 18 and none of those over 64.

Government

In November 2005, residents elected 22-year-old Hannah Stauts as mayor of Stanley. Stauts, a former resident of Boise, was the youngest female mayor in the United States. The current mayor is Herb Mumford, a retired engineer who was elected in November 2009.[21]

Climate

Stanley has an alpine subarctic climate with very cold winters and warm summers with a very large diurnal temperature variation. Frosts can occur at any time of the year. There are on average 290 mornings in the year with frost (10 of them in July) and 60 nights that reach 0 °F (−17.8 °C).[22] The cold weather is due to Stanley's location in a protected valley that traps cold air from the surrounding mountains, creating strong temperature inversions.

Climate data for Stanley, Idaho, 1981–2010 normals, extremes 1916-present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 54
(12)
65
(18)
64
(18)
77
(25)
84
(29)
91
(33)
98
(37)
97
(36)
89
(32)
80
(27)
66
(19)
50
(10)
98
(37)
Average high °F (°C) 25.8
(−3.4)
32.8
(0.4)
43.3
(6.3)
50.5
(10.3)
60.0
(15.6)
68.6
(20.3)
79.1
(26.2)
78.8
(26.0)
69.4
(20.8)
56.2
(13.4)
37.8
(3.2)
24.4
(−4.2)
52.2
(11.2)
Average low °F (°C) −1.7
(−18.7)
−1.1
(−18.4)
9.8
(−12.3)
19.4
(−7.0)
27.4
(−2.6)
33.1
(0.6)
35.7
(2.1)
33.4
(0.8)
26.4
(−3.1)
20.1
(−6.6)
10.8
(−11.8)
−1.8
(−18.8)
17.6
(−8.0)
Record low °F (°C) −46
(−43)
−47
(−44)
−31
(−35)
−16
(−27)
8
(−13)
15
(−9)
15
(−9)
16
(−9)
9
(−13)
−10
(−23)
−26
(−32)
−54
(−48)
−54
(−48)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 1.28
(33)
1.44
(37)
1.18
(30)
1.01
(26)
0.91
(23)
0.87
(22)
0.47
(12)
0.40
(10)
0.44
(11)
0.84
(21)
1.68
(43)
1.73
(44)
12.25
(312)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 17.4
(44)
13.0
(33)
9.9
(25)
3.4
(8.6)
0.9
(2.3)
0.2
(0.51)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.4
(1.0)
1.7
(4.3)
10.6
(27)
14.6
(37)
72.1
(182.71)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 9 7 6 5 7 7 3 4 5 4 8 7 72
Source: WRCC[23]

In latitude and elevation, Stanley's weather station is a near-perfect twin of the station at the summit of Mt. Washington in New Hampshire. But although both are quite cold, their climates are very different.

Culture and festivals

During the summers, the Sawtooth Mountain Mamas Craft Fair is held in the field next to the grocery store, usually for about 2–3 days in July.[24]

A music festival, the Sawtooth Valley Gathering, also attracts a fair number of people.[25]

The National Hockey League considered Stanley as one potential host for the 2021 NHL Outdoors hockey games. Lake Tahoe was chosen as the ultimate location.[26]

In literature

An imaginative 1980 novel by Gino Sky, Appaloosa Rising: the Legend of the Cowboy Buddha, is set in the Stanley area.[27]

A 2003 memoir by John Rember, Traplines: Coming Home to the Sawtooth Valley describes life in Stanley and its surrounding area, and the cultural changes connected to the establishment of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area.[28]

References

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  4. ^ "State Centers of Population, 2000". United States Census. Archived from the original on 2010-02-23. Retrieved 2011-12-10.
  5. ^ "Idaho for the Curious", by Cort Conley, 1982, ISBN 0-9603566-3-0, p. 188-189
  6. ^ Hillinger, Charles (October 8, 1976). "Old West still alive and well". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. (Los Angeles Times). p. 21.
  7. ^ "22-year-old Stanley woman is Idaho's youngest elected mayor". Moscow-Pullman Daily News. Idaho-Washington. Associated Press. December 6, 2005. p. 2A.
  8. ^ "Solar Eclipse Preparedness for Stanley Residents & Visitors". Stanley Idaho, Trailhead to Idaho Adventure. 2018-08-10. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  9. ^ "Idaho Dims The Lights For One Of The Best Night Skies Anywhere". NPR.org. 2017-11-25. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  10. ^ Herald, Ryan Olson Daily (2017-08-25). "Idaho trip for eclipse was totality worth it". Daily Herald. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  12. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Stanley, Idaho
  13. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  14. ^ "Ponderosa Pine Scenic Byway". Visit Idaho. Archived from the original on September 6, 2015. Retrieved October 26, 2015.
  15. ^ "Sawtooth Scenic Byway". Visit Idaho. Retrieved October 26, 2015.
  16. ^ "Salmon River Scenic Byway". Visit Idaho. Retrieved October 26, 2015.
  17. ^ "M 6.5 - 70km W of Challis, Idaho". USGS Earthquake Hazards Program. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  18. ^ Blanchard, Nicole (31 March 2020). "Idaho has a history of earthquakes. Here's how they compare to Tuesday's 6.5 quake". Idaho Statesman. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  19. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  20. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  21. ^ stanley.id.gov - city officials - accessed 2011-12-10
  22. ^ "Period of Record General Climate Summary - Temperature - NOAA". NOAA.
  23. ^ "Stanley, Idaho". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved 2017-03-27.
  24. ^ "Craft Fair General Information". Sawtooth Mountain Mamas. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  25. ^ "The Sawtooth Valley Gathering". Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  26. ^ "NHL to hold two outdoor games in Lake Tahoe". NHL.com. Retrieved 2021-01-11.
  27. ^ "Appaloosa Rising: the Legend of the Cowboy Buddha". Kirkus Reviews. 1980-05-16. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  28. ^ Rember, John (2003). Traplines: coming home to Sawtooth Valley (1st Pantheon ed.). New York: Pantheon Books. ISBN 0375422072.

Further reading

External links