Star Wars Roleplaying Game (Fantasy Flight Games)

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Star Wars Roleplaying Game
Edge of the Empire
Edge-of-the-Empire-Corerulebook FFG 2013.jpg
Cover art by Scott Schomburg
Designed by
Published byFantasy Flight Games
Publication date2013;
8 years ago
 (2013)
GenresSpace opera
SystemsCustom
ISBN978-1616616571
Star Wars Roleplaying Game
Age of Rebellion
FFE-SWAgeofRebellion cover.jpg
Designed bySterling Hershey
Published byFantasy Flight Games
Publication date3 August 2014;
6 years ago
 (2014-08-03)
GenresSpace opera
SystemsCustom
ISBN978-1616617806
Star Wars Roleplaying Game
Force and Destiny
FFE-SWForce&Destiny cover.jpg
Designed bySterling Hershey
Published byFantasy Flight Games
Publication date2015;
6 years ago
 (2015)
GenresSpace opera
SystemsCustom
ISBN978-1633441224

The Star Wars Roleplaying Game is a tabletop role-playing game set in the Star Wars universe, first published by Fantasy Flight Games in 2012. It consists of three different standalone games, each one is separate themed experience:[1]

  • Star Wars: Edge of the Empire [2] (for playing bounty hunters, colonists, explorers, hired guns, smugglers, or technicians).[1]
  • Star Wars: Age of Rebellion [2] (for playing rebel soldiers and freedom fighters against the evil Galactic Empire)
  • Star Wars: Force and Destiny [2] (for playing the last Jedi Knights under the Empire's rule)
  • Star Wars: The Force Awakens (set prior to the events of the third Star Wars trilogy)[3]
  • Star Wars: Rise of the Separatists (Set during the Clone Wars, players can be Jedi, clone troopers and even work for the Separatists)[4]


Development[edit]

Previous Star Wars collectible card and roleplaying game publisher Wizards of the Coast declined to renew their licence in 2010 after 11 years.[5] At Gen Con 2011 Fantasy Flight Games announced they had acquired the licence from Lucasfilm Ltd., and at the following Gen Con announcing Star Wars: Edge of the Empire for 2013, Star Wars: Age of Rebellion for 2014, and Star Wars: Force and Destiny for 2015, while releasing Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beta and Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game later in the same year. These releases revealed that the new RPG was based on Jay Little’s Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay 3rd edition, with the dice becoming the narrative dice system [2]:315

Age of Rebellion's beta version was released in October 2013, a beginner set released on April 25, 2014,[6] and the final version of the game, the Age of Rebellion core rulebook, released on July 3, 2014.[7] The third line of products, Star Wars: Force and Destiny, for playing Jedi characters, was released in beta in September 2014. In August 2018, the sourcebook Rise of the Separatists, set during the Clone Wars,[8] it was released May 9, 2019.[9]

Fantasy Flight initially drew criticism for releasing a beta version, making people pay twice, and for the extra expense of the unusual custom dice; but reviews after launch were enthusiastic about the dice, with Game Informer saying "In practice, this system offers tremendous flexibility to allow the players to participate in the storytelling process, rather than just waiting for the GM to respond after a die roll. The players talk together about how to interpret a roll of the dice, and shape the results to make the most exciting story. It also speaks strongly to the cinematic nature of the Star Wars universe; characters in the movies often succeed or fail along with potent side effects."[1] and Penny Arcade saying "This dice system is designed to facilitate awesome storytelling and it worked great!"[10]

Release timeline[edit]

In the following release timeline, supplements are not included, however the timeline includes dice sets and the principal rule-containing products from all four lines of standalone games, including beta versions, beginner games, and core rulebooks.

  • August 2012: Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beta Version
  • December 2012: Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game, a boxed set including the first mass-produced dice of the game.
  • January 2013: The standalone Star Wars: Edge of the Empire roleplay dice sets are released.
  • June 2013: Star Wars: Edge of the Empire (core rulebook)
  • September 2013: Star Wars: Age of Rebellion Beta Version
  • April 2014: Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Beginner Game (Box Set)
  • July 2014: Star Wars: Age of Rebellion (core rulebook)
  • July 2014: The dice sets from the game are re-released, this time with the label Star Wars Roleplaying Dice.
  • September 2014: Star Wars: Force and Destiny Beta Version
  • June 2015: Star Wars: Force and Destiny Beginner Game (Box Set)
  • July 2015: Star Wars: Force and Destiny (core rulebook)
  • September 2016: Star Wars: The Force Awakens Beginner Game (Box Set)
  • February 2018: Dawn of Rebellion (Era sourcebook)
  • August 2018: Rise of the Separatists (Era sourcebook) is announced.
  • January 2019: Allies and Adversaries (Profile sourcebook) is announced.
  • May 2019: Rise of the Separatists (Era sourcebook)
  • December 2019: Gadgets and Gear (sourcebook)
  • February 2020: Starships and Speeders (sourcebook)

Setting[edit]

All three installments of the Star Wars Roleplaying Game are set within the time period of the original Star Wars trilogy. Star Wars: Edge of the Empire is set shortly after the destruction of the first Death Star, and deals with characters on the fringes of galactic space. Age of Rebellion is set around the time of The Empire Strikes Back, and allows players to join the Rebellion. Like Edge of the Empire, Force and Destiny is set shortly after the destruction of the first Death Star and the death of Obi-Wan Kenobi, when the force sensitives and Jedi slowly start to re-emerge in hopes of rebuilding the Jedi Order.

The Rise of the Separatists Era sourcebook is set during the Clone Wars era at the beginning of the Palpatine regime. Players can be Jedi, clone troopers or Separatists.

The Dawn of Rebellion Era sourcebook is set during the waning of the Republic and the ascendance of the Empire. It deals with the events at the time of Rogue One, in which the Rebellion is divided into factions and is opposing the Empire just as it is consolidating its power.

The Force Awakens Beginner Game is set during the current era depicted in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, with the adventure provided taking place just before the events of the movie.

Game system[edit]

Characteristics[edit]

The Characteristics are Brawn (Physical Power), Agility (Physical Precision), Intellect (Intelligence and "Book Smarts"), Cunning (Wisdom and "Street Smarts"), Willpower (Endurance and Focus), and Presence (Charisma and Attractiveness).[11]:15–16[12]:22–23[13] Characteristic levels range from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 6, although there is a ceiling of 5 during character creation. Each character race has different base Characteristic levels, though additional levels in each attribute can be gained during or after character creation, at the cost of the value of the next level times 10. (Example: Raising a character's Brawn from 2 to 3 would cost 3 x 10, or 30 points). The character can also unlock the Talent Dedication for 25 points, which grants a +1 Characteristic increase, once per career Specialization Tree (see Talents, below).

Strain is a derived characteristic based on a Racial minimum plus the character's Willpower that determines how much physical, mental or emotional stress a character can take before collapsing. Wound Points are a derived characteristic based on a Racial minimum plus the character's Brawn that determines how much physical damage a character can take before passing out or slipping into a coma. Soak is the protection granted by the clothing or armor a character is wearing and/or the character's natural toughness. Defense is resistance to melee and/or ranged weapon attacks and is granted by armor or certain Talents.

Templates[edit]

After determining attributes, the player designs their character using a Species Template.[11]:43–53[12]:51–60[14] Each species has different racial characteristic minimums and maximums. Some species also have a free level in a racial skill (usually up to a maximum of Level 2 at creation) or have a species Special Ability. As an example, Humans[note 1] have a species template that has a score of 2 in all Characteristics and can have any two different non-career skills of the player's choice at the start of play. Characters can also pay points to increase starting wealth (a baseline of 500 credits / point) or raise their racial skills and advantages.

The player then picks a Career (like Technician or Ace), which grants 8 Career Skills (of which the player must choose 4). Then they pick one of the three or more Specializations of that Career (like the Smuggler career's Pilot, Scoundrel and Thief specializations from the core rulebook[11]:80). Each Specialization grants 4 more Career Skills (of which the player must pick 2), and a Specialization Tree, which grants specialization-based Talents.[note 2]

All the Career Skills listed under the character's Career and Specialization (whether chosen or not during character creation) can be bought for a flat point cost. The non-Career skills cost an extra 5 points per level. The Career Skills chosen by the player from the career and specialization lists are granted their first level free during initial character creation, but cost the same as other Career Skills when buying higher levels.

Characters cannot buy a new Career but may buy additional Specializations - whether they are under their Career or not. However, if a character wishes to buy another specialization, it costs less for one under their chosen Career than for one under another Career. For example, the Engineer Career in the core Age of Rebellion book narrows down to the Mechanic, Saboteur, and Scientist specializations. An Engineer - Mechanic who wants to add the Engineer's Scientist specialization would pay less than if they wanted to add the Ace's Pilot specialization. The character can even take a Specialization from one of the other games like the Edge of the Empire Technician's Slicer[note 3] or Bounty Hunter's Martial Artist specializations.

The Universal "Careers" are generic Specializations that can be used by any of the core games. Some allow characters from one game to crossover to the others. Force Sensitive Exile and Force Sensitive Emergent allow veteran characters from Edge of the Empire and Age of Rebellion respectively to become Force users and use the Force and Destiny game rules. Recruit allows Edge of the Empire characters to cross over to the more idealistic Age of Rebellion campaigns. They cost the same as if they were Specializations under the character's existing Career, making them cheaper and more effective than buying a Specialization under a different Career.

Skills[edit]

There are three types of skills in the Star Wars Roleplaying Game. Knowledge skills cover intellectual pursuits, Combat skills cover confrontational actions, and General skills cover non-combat actions.[11]:101[12]:113[15]

The game's rules assume that all characters have all the game system's skills at "zero level" if they do not have a level in it. The character's default skill level is equal to the skill's governing Characteristic score. "Default" skill rolls use one green 8-sided Ability die per Characteristic level.

Purchasing a level in a skill makes the character an expert in it. Skills have a maximum level of 5 (but a ceiling of level 2 during character creation). Skill levels can be purchased for five points times the next level (5 x Lvl) for Career skills, with the additional cost of five additional points (5 x Lvl [+5] = Cost) for non-Career skills. For instance, buying level 1 in Athletics skill would cost no points if it was a selected career or specialization skill during character creation, 5 points (5 x 1 = 5) if it was a non-selected career skill during or after character creation, and 10 points (5 x 1 [+5] = 10) if it was a non-career skill. Buying level 2 would cost 10 points (5 x 2 = 10) for a selected or non-selected career skill and 15 points (5 x 2 [+5] = 15) for a non-career skill.

Regular skill rolls substitute a yellow 12-sided Proficiency die for a green Ability die per skill level. For instance, a character with a level of 4 in computers skill and a level of 5 in their Intellect attribute would roll four Proficiency dice and one Ability die rather than five Ability dice. It can also add green Ability dice if the character's skill level is higher than their attribute level. Let's say that in the example above the character instead had a level of 5 in computers skill and a level of 4 in their Intellect attribute. They would still roll four Proficiency dice and one Ability die rather than five Proficiency dice until the character's Intellect is raised to 5. Blue 6-sided Boost Dice are added for advantageous events or if another character is helping the player character with the attempt.

Skill rolls are opposed by rolling a pool of purple 8-sided Difficulty Dice. Depending on the complexity of the task the character is attempting, it could range from one Difficulty die for an Easy complexity task (picking a keyhole lock) to five Difficulty dice for a Formidable complexity task (cracking a complex vault door lock without knowing the schematics). Black 6-sided Setback Dice are added for disadvantageous events

If the character is being opposed by an NPC antagonist while performing a task, then the dice pool is based on the NPC's opposing skill. The Difficulty Pool is created by adding a purple Difficulty Die for each green Ability Die the NPC has in the skill and a red 12-sided Challenge Die for each yellow 12-sided Proficiency Die the NPC has in the skill. Black Setback Dice are added if another NPC is helping the antagonist NPC to hinder the player character's attempt.

Talents[edit]

Talents are advantages that add flavor to a character and either grant bonuses, benefit allies, remove penalties during play, or penalize adversaries.[11]:127–145[12]:139–159[16] They cost experience points to buy, and must be unlocked in the order they appear on a diagram called a "Specialization Tree" (similar to those found in video games such as Star Wars: The Old Republic)[11]:93[12]:103>.[17] The further down the diagram, the more powerful (and expensive)[note 4] the Talents become. This means that sometimes a player has to buy Talents that they do not want or require in order to get to desired talents further down the same branch. However, it avoids having the character cherry-pick the more powerful talents and leaving the rest. The player can only buy a selection on the tree once (but can sometimes buy it again if a higher level appears lower down on the diagram).

Each Career Specialization has its own Specialization Tree. Each Tree has four columns and five rows, for a total of 20 Talents each.[11]:93[12]:103[18] When the tree is all filled out, the character cannot buy any more talents from it. If the player wishes to obtain more Talents for their character, then they must purchase a new Career Specialization and begin filling out that Specialization Tree.

Talents are split into two groups. "Passive" talents (which have a blue code) denote abilities that are considered always on and can be used for the entire duration of the session. "Active" talents (which have a red code) denote abilities that require a difficulty roll to turn on prior to use, and in some cases can only be used a limited number of times in a given session. Some talents have levels and can be purchased more than once. The talent's levels stack, even if they are bought for different amounts of experience points.

Example: Grit is a passive Talent that grants a bonus of +1 per level to the character's Strain. Let's say a player bought their character three levels of Grit from one Specialization Tree at a total cost of 45 points (10+15+20 = 45). Then they bought one level of Grit on another Specialization Tree at a cost of 10 points. They would cumulatively stack as four levels of Grit (granting a total of +4 to Strain).

Disadvantages[edit]

Disadvantages can be taken during character creation to offset point costs.

Edge of the Empire has Obligation, something the character is forced or compelled to do.[11]:29,38–43 The number of Player Characters in the group sets the base disadvantage number. The smaller the group, the larger the Disadvantage level that each player must bear. The Game Master rolls percentile dice at the beginning of play to see which character's disadvantage will be used during the session. The character can pay off the disadvantage with experience points in gameplay.

Age of Rebellion has Duty, something the character wants to do.[12]:46–50 Levels of Duty can be cashed in for Contribution levels, which establish the individual or group's rank in the Rebellion. It also can be used to grant gifts of equipment, vehicles, or resources.

Force and Destiny has Morality, which governs how close the Force-using character is to slipping over to the Dark Side.[19] Unlike the other two games, Morality is governed by a character's actions during gameplay. Conflict is generated whenever they choose to perform a morally questionable action or choose to use the Dark Side of the Force in order to power their abilities. Morality cannot be 'bought' with XP, instead a player wanting to change their alignment must actually role-play a more aggressive character to turn Dark, or perform acts of compassion to become a paragon of the Light.

Motivation is the character's guiding principle. In the cynical Edge of the Empire, it is an Ambition, Cause or Relationship.[20] In the idealistic Age of Rebellion, it is a Quest, Belief or Personal Connection.[21] In Force and Destiny it is an Ambition, Cause or Faith.[22] If the player uses the character's Motivation during gameplay, they get an experience point bonus.

Dice[edit]

Polyhedral dice and Destiny Tokens (rear) used in the game

Using Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay 3rd edition, as its basis, the dice became the narrative dice system. Star Wars Roleplaying Game uses a variety of named dice types: ability, boost, challenge, difficulty, force, proficiency, and setbacks to give a range of different results: success, triumph, advantage, failure, despair, and threat.[2]:315 The required custom dice or dice roller app, split up the dice types into positive and negative, with a third type representing the Force.[1]

Destiny Tokens[edit]

Destiny Tokens are small round pieces of cardboard that are black on one side and white on the other.[23][24][25] They represent the party's pool of Destiny Points. They are granted based on Force Dice rolls at the beginning of each session. Each player in the party rolls a Force Die and the number of White and Black dots are added up. The Player Characters' party gets the tokens of one color and the game master gets the remaining tokens of the opposing color. White Tokens (The Light Side of the Force) are for the Good Guys. Black Tokens (The Dark Side of the Force) are for the Bad Guys. The party's affiliation determines which color they get. (Although players' characters begin play firmly on the Light Side - or are at least redeemable to it - there is a possibility that they could slide, fall or even leap into the Dark Side during play.)

A Destiny Point can be spent to award a bonus die for a character's action (by adding a green Ability Die or converting an Ability Die into a yellow Proficiency Die), or inflict a penalty die to the opposition's effort (by adding a purple Difficulty Die or converting a Difficulty Die into a red Challenge Die). Every time a Destiny Point is used by the party or the game master, one of their Destiny Tokens is flipped over to change its color. This flipped token can now be added to the opposite side's pool. Players have to decide whether they want to spend a Destiny Point that may be needed later or not spend it to limit the game master's ability to help a named NPC antagonist or penalize a player character.

Destiny Points can also be used to change a situation or cancel out or re-roll an unfavorable result like a fatal hit or pivotal skill-check failure.

Example: "I'm drawing my pistol..." "Did you remember to retrieve your pistol when you fell down that hillside last scene?"

Combat Rules[edit]

The first step in combat is to figure out Initiative,[26][27][28] which is figured by making a Cool or Vigilance skill check. The results (best to worst) indicate the order in which the characters and their adversaries act.

The Combat skills are Brawl, Melee, Lightsaber, Ranged (Light), Ranged (Heavy), and Gunnery.[29][30][31] The close combat skills - Brawl and Melee - use Brawn and the ranged combat skills - Ranged (Light), Ranged (Heavy), and Gunnery - use Agility.

  • Brawl covers unarmed combat.
  • Melee covers armed combat.
    • Lightsaber covers armed combat with a Lightsaber or similar focused energy weapon (like Phase Daggers or Lightwhips). Anyone can learn to use a Lightsaber, but a character has to be a Force Sensitive in order to wield it effectively. Lightsabers use Brawn[note 5] as its base attribute (like all melee weapons). However, certain Force and Destiny Talents can use Agility or even Intellect or Presence as a base.
  • Ranged (Light) are small ranged weapons that can be carried and fired with one hand.
  • Ranged (Heavy) are large ranged weapons that need to be carried by two hands.
  • Gunnery covers pintle-mounted or turreted ranged weapons, usually mounted on vehicles and starships. It also covers fixed-firing on-board weapon systems like a starfighter's laser cannons, ion cannons, and proton torpedo launchers.

Combat modifiers are calculated using Range Bands (the approximate distance the character is from the target).[32][33][34] The hand-to-hand skills (Brawl, Melee, and Lightsaber) can only be used at Engaged range. The ranged combat weapons are used at Close, Medium, Long, and Extreme range (the longer the range, the greater the Difficulty rank). Characters with a ranged weapon suffer a Difficulty penalty when in Engaged range because their target is too close for the character to aim properly. Characters operating a gunnery weapon or weapon station while in Engaged range cannot use it until they defeat or drive off their opponent.

Non-Player Characters in Combat[edit]

In combat the player characters have three kinds of adversaries: Minions, Rivals, and Nemeses.[35][36][37]

Minions are "nameless individuals who provide muscle to flesh out encounters"[11]:389 - like 'Mooks' in Feng Shui. They have group Soak and Wound Threshold ratings. When a character attacks them, the Minion group subtracts their Soak from it. Every time the damage exceeds the wound threshold, a minion "succumbs" and the group loses a member.[note 6] If the damage doesn't exceed the threshold, the minion is fine and can continue fighting. If an individual minion takes a Critical Injury, they are incapacitated; an area-effect attack on a minion group that inflicts a Critical Injury incapacitates one minion per Critical Injury scored.

Example: A Rebel soldier fires a blaster pistol at a squad of four Stormtroopers, which have a Soak of 5 and a Wound Threshold of 5. If he scored 10 Damage, it would do (10-5-5 = 0) Wounds, and would have no effect (since no Damage got through their Soak and Wound Threshold). If he scored 11 Damage, it would do (11-5-5 = 1) Wounds, and would incapacitate one of the Stormtroopers. If he scored 15 Damage, it would do (15-5-5 = 5) Wounds, and would still only incapacitate one Stormtrooper (because their base Wound Threshold is 5). Scoring 16 to 20 Damage would incapacitate two Stormtroopers (because it inflicted 6 to 10 Wounds, which is equal to 2 Stormtroopers' worth of Damage).

Rivals are named adversaries that are "more dangerous than minions but still inferior to most Player Characters".[11]:390 They act as minor antagonists and/or lieutenants to major antagonists.[note 7] They suffer Wounds and Critical Injuries normally, but can die if their Wound Threshold is exceeded.

A Nemesis is the opposite of the character, the Big Bad Guy to their Good Guy[note 8][note 9](or vice-versa for Dark Side characters). They are usually more powerful than the character in order for them to be a challenge - not just for the character, but for the whole party. They are treated like player characters when they fight, make skill checks, and take damage. The main thing that separates a Nemesis from a Rival is that they are the major antagonist. They are the dragon in the cave, the villain in the third act of the screenplay, or the endboss of the video game.

Minions and Rivals do not take Strain. Instead, the Strain inflicted is converted into Wounds. Minions cannot use abilities or invoke effects that use Strain, but Rivals can. When Rivals use abilities or invoke effects that suffer Strain, it is converted into Wounds. Since Minions and Rivals don't take Strain, it can't be recovered. In contrast, Nemeses take and recover Strain like Player Characters do.

A group of Minions can't have ranks in skills individually. However, they can attain ranks in skills depending on how many of them work together. The more Minions that are incapacitated, the lower the group's maximum skill rank will become. Rivals and Nemeses have ranks in skills like player characters and can gain Boost dice or inflict Setback dice when they work together.

Books and supplements[edit]

Star Wars Roleplaying Game[edit]

These items can be used with Edge of the Empire, Age of Rebellion and/or Force and Destiny rules sets.

  • Rulebooks / basic sets
    • Star Wars: The Force Awakens - Beginner Game: The game is set before Star Wars: The Force Awakens, during the New Republic era. Box set includes the 48-page Star Wars: The Force Awakens basic rule book, a 14-piece Star Wars: Roleplaying Game Dice set, and a set of 8 Destiny Tokens. Also includes the 32-page adventure module book Discovery on Jakku and the following play aids: four eight-page pre-generated player character booklets, a double-sided map (obverse (2 maps): hangar bay of the Silencer / wreck of the Starlight Wanderer; reverse (1 map): Galactic Map with major trade routes and a sidebar with short entries on the planets Jakku, Takodana, and D'Quar and the First Order's Starkiller Base), and 49 character and vehicle tokens. The Beginner Game rule book is limited and lacks the full gameplay and character generation and development rules from the other three Core Books. No core book, Era sourcebook, or supplements are scheduled to follow.
  • Accessories
    • Star Wars Roleplaying Dice (2014): A set containing 1 white Force die, 3 green Advantage dice, 2 yellow Proficiency dice, 2 blue Boost dice, 3 purple Difficulty dice, 1 red Challenge die, 2 black Setback dice, and a set of 4 Destiny Tokens.
    • Star Wars Roleplaying Critical Damage Decks - A quick reference for Game Masters that details the results of a Critical Damage roll. Can also be drawn to randomly select a result rather than using a d100 roll.
Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Critical Damage Decks
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Characters - Critical Injury Deck
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Ships and Vehicles - Critical Hit Deck
    • Star Wars Roleplaying Adversaries Decks - Contains stats for NPCs. Can be used as a quick reference by the Game Master, or to randomly select an NPC adversary when needed.
Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Adversary Decks
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Scum and Villainy Adversary Deck
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Imperials and Rebels Adversary Deck
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Citizens of the Galaxy Adversary Deck
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Creatures of the Galaxy Adversary Deck
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Imperials and Rebels II Adversary Deck
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Hunters and Force Users Adversary Deck
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Imperials and Rebels III Adversary Deck
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Republic and Separatist Adversary Deck
  • Star Wars Roleplaying Game: Republic and Separatist II Adversary Deck
  • Adventures
    • Star Wars: The Force Awakens - A Call for Heroes: A sequel to Discovery on Jakku from the Beginner's Game. It is a 30-page booklet that is available from their website as a downloadable PDF file.
  • Sourcebooks
    • Rise of the Separatists (Era Sourcebook): Set during the Prequel movies (Star Wars: Episodes I, II & III) and the Star Wars: Clone Wars TV series (Star Wars: The Clone Wars (TV 2003-2005) & Star Wars: The Clone Wars (TV 2008-2013)) at the beginning of the Clone Wars era.
    • Collapse of the Republic (Era Sourcebook): Set during the events of Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith. Details the end of the Clone Wars, the decline of the Old Republic, the purge of the Jedi Order, and the rise of the Sith. Introduces new character Races, Careers, and Specialization Trees and details important NPCs of the period.
    • Dawn of Rebellion (Era Sourcebook): Set during the events of the Rogue One: A Star Wars Story movie and the Star Wars: Rebels (TV 2014-2018) series, between the rise of the Empire and the beginning of the Rebellion.
    • Allies and Adversaries (Non-Player Character Sourcebook): Profiles and stats for over 130 NPCs. Details Rebels, Imperials, and assorted rogues, scum and villains.
    • Gadgets and Gear (Weapons and Equipment Sourcebook): Collects most of the weapons and gear from the Edge of the Empire, Age of Rebellion, and Force and Destiny lines, plus new content made just for this volume.
    • Starships and Speeders (Ships and Vehicles Sourcebook): Collects most of the ships and vehicles from Edge of the Empire, Age of Rebellion, and Force and Destiny lines, plus new content made just for this volume.

Star Wars: Edge of the Empire[edit]

  • Rulebooks / basic sets
    • Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Beta Rules: Rule Book contains the beginning adventure module Crates of Krayts. It came with five full-color character sheets and a sheet of Roleplaying Dice conversion stickers. Requires 4 six-sided dice, 6 eight-sided dice, and 4 twelve-sided dice of an appropriate size to make a full basic dice set.
    • Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Beginner Game: Box set includes the 48-page Star Wars: Edge of the Empire basic rule book, a 14-piece Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Dice set, and a set of 8 Destiny Tokens. Also includes the 32-page adventure module book Escape from Mos Shuuta and the following play aids: four eight-page pre-generated player character booklets, a double-sided map (obverse side: a cantina / reverse side: the interior of the Krayt's Fang - a Corellian YT-1300 light freighter), 35 character tokens, and 5 vehicle tokens. Downloadable PDF files of two additional eight-page pre-generated player character booklets are available from their website. The Beginner Game basic rule book is limited and lacks the full gameplay and character generation and development rules from the Core Book.
    • Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Core Rulebook
    • Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Game Master's Kit: Includes the 4-panel gamemaster's screen and a 32-page booklet containing the adventure module Debts to Pay and an article discussing hints on how best to use the Nemesis Character system for Star Wars campaigns.
  • Accessories
    • Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Dice (2013): A set containing 1 white Force die, 3 green Advantage dice, 2 yellow Proficiency dice, 2 blue Boost dice, 3 purple Difficulty dice, 1 red Challenge die, 2 black Setback dice, and a set of 4 Destiny Tokens.
    • Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Career Decks: Decks of cards that can be used as a quick reference tool for players and game masters. Each card shows one of a Career's Talents and can be used to remember what Talents a character has and how they are used. They can also randomize what Talents an NPC uses.
Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Explorer Career Decks
  • Edge of the Empire: Explorer Signature Abilities Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Explorer - Fringer Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Explorer – Trader Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Explorer - Scout Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Explorer - Archeologist Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Explorer – Big Game Hunter Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Explorer - Driver Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Hired Gun Career Decks
  • Edge of the Empire: Hired Gun Signature Abilities Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Hired Gun - Bodyguard Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Hired Gun - Marauder Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Hired Gun – Mercenary Soldier Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Hired Gun - Enforcer Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Hired Gun - Heavy Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Hired Gun - Demolitionist Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Colonist Career Decks
  • Edge of the Empire: Colonist Signature Abilities Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Colonist - Doctor Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Colonist - Politico Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Colonist - Scholar Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Colonist - Entrepreneur Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Colonist - Marshall Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Colonist - Performer Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Smuggler Career Decks
  • Edge of the Empire: Smuggler Signature Abilities Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Smuggler - Scoundrel Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Smuggler - Thief Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Smuggler - Pilot Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Smuggler - Charmer Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Smuggler - Gambler Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Smuggler - Gunslinger Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Technician Career Decks
  • Edge of the Empire: Technician Signature Abilities Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Technician - Mechanic Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Technician – Outlaw Tech Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Technician - Slicer Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Technician – Cyber Tech Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Technician - Droid Tech Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Technician - Modder Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Bounty Hunter Career Decks
  • Edge of the Empire: Bounty Hunter Signature Abilities Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Bounty Hunter - Assassin Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Bounty Hunter - Gageteer Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Bounty Hunter - Survivalist Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Bounty Hunter – Skip Tracer Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Bounty Hunter – Martial Artist Specialization Deck
  • Edge of the Empire: Bounty Hunter - Operator Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Universal Career Specialization Decks
  • Edge of the Empire: Universal - Force Sensitive Exile Specialization Deck.
  • Adventures
    • Beyond the Rim - The Separatist treasure ship Sa Nalaor was believed lost, but speculation and tantalizing rumors of its location keep circulating in every dive and hideout in the Galaxy. The characters are trying to beat other crews of treasure-seekers (and perhaps, each other) to its resting place.
    • The Jewel of Yavin - A heist in which the characters strive to acquire a priceless corusca gem.
    • The Long Arm of the Hutt - A sequel to Escape from Mos Shuuta from the Beginner Game. It is a free PDF file that is downloadable from their website.
    • Mask of the Pirate Queen - The characters are looking to collect the bounty on the infamous Pirate Queen of Saleucami.
    • Under a Black Sun (Free RPG Day Supplemental Adventure): A booklet with Dice Conversion tables, Fast-Play Rules for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire, 4 pre-generated characters, and an adventure set on Corellia involving the Black Sun pirate syndicate. They were given away at retailers on Free RPG Day (Saturday, June 15, 2013). Star Wars: Edge of the Empire - Under a Black Sun is currently available for free download at the site.
  • Rules Supplements
    • Dangerous Covenants (Hired Gun Career Book) - Adds the Demolitionist, Enforcer, and Heavy Specializations.
    • Enter the Unknown (Explorer Career Book) - Adds the Archeologist, Big Game Hunter and Driver Specializations.
    • Far Horizons (Colonist Career Book) - Adds the Entrepreneur, Marshall, and Performer Specializations.
    • Fly Casual (Smuggler Career Book) - Adds the Charmer, Gambler, and Gunslinger Specializations.
    • No Disintegrations (Bounty Hunter Career Book) - Adds the Martial Artist, Operator and Skip Tracer Specializations.
    • Special Modifications (Technician Career Book) - Adds the Cyber Tech, Droid Tech, and Modder Specializations.
  • Sourcebooks
    • Lords of Nal Hutta (Hutt Space Source Book)
    • Suns of Fortune (Corellian Sector Source Book)

Star Wars: Age of Rebellion[edit]

  • Rulebooks / basic sets
    • Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Beta: Contains the adventure Operation: Shell Game. Includes one full-color character sheet and six pre-generated illustrated character sheets. Dice set not included.
    • Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Beginner Game: Box set includes the basic 48-page Star Wars: Age of Rebellion rule book, four eight-page pre-generated illustrated player character booklets, a set of 14 Star Wars Roleplaying Dice, and a set of 8 Destiny Tokens. Also includes the 32-page adventure module book Takeover at Whisper Base and the following play aids: a double-sided map, 33 character tokens and 7 vehicle tokens. The Beginner Game rule book is limited and lacks the full gameplay and character generation and development rules from the Core Book.
    • Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Core Rulebook
  • Accessories
    • Star Wars: Age of Rebellion Game Master's Kit - Includes the 4-panel gamemaster's screen and a 32-page booklet containing the adventure Dead in the Water. Includes expanded rules for land and space combat.
    • Star Wars: Age of Rebellion Career Decks: Decks of cards that can be used as a quick reference tool for players and game masters. Each card shows one of a Career's Talents and can be used to remember what Talents a character has and what they do.
Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Ace Career Decks
  • Age of Rebellion: Ace Signature Abilities Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Ace - Driver Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Ace - Gunner Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Ace - Pilot Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Ace - Beast Rider Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Ace - Hotshot Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Ace - Rigger Specialization Deck.
Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Diplomat Career Decks
  • Age of Rebellion: Diplomat Signature Abilities Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Diplomat - Agitator Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Diplomat - Ambassador Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Diplomat - Quartermaster Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Diplomat - Advocate Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Diplomat - Analyst Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Diplomat - Propagandist Specialization Deck.
Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Commander Career Decks
  • Age of Rebellion: Commander Signature Abilities Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Commander - Commodore Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Commander - Squadron Leader Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Commander - Tactician Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Commander - Figurehead Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Commander - Instructor Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Commander - Strategist Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Soldier Career Decks
  • Age of Rebellion: Soldier Signature Abilities Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Soldier - Commando Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Soldier - Medic Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Soldier - Sharpshooter Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Soldier - Heavy Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Soldier - Trailblazer Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Soldier - Vanguard Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Engineer Career Decks
  • Age of Rebellion: Engineer Signature Abilities Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Engineer - Mechanic Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Engineer - Saboteur Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Engineer - Scientist Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Engineer - Droid Specialist Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Engineer - Sapper Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Engineer - Shipwright Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Spy Career Decks
  • Age of Rebellion: Spy Signature Abilities Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion: Spy - Infiltrator Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Spy - Scout Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Spy - Slicer Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Spy - Courier Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Spy - Interrogator Specialization Deck
  • Age of Rebellion: Spy - Sleeper Agent Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Age of Rebellion - Universal Career Decks
  • Age of Rebellion - Force Sensitive Emergent Specialization Deck.
  • Age of Rebellion - Recruit Specialization Deck.
  • Adventures
    • Rescue at Glare Peak Box Set (Rebellion Day Supplemental Adventure) - Contains a 48-page Adventure / Star Wars - Age of Rebellion Fast-Play Rules booklet, three sets of play aids (each containing a mapsheet with three maps and 4 pre-generated character sheets) to run three one-shot sessions, a set of 14 Star Wars Roleplaying Dice and 8 Destiny Tokens, and a promotional Rebellion Day poster. Only available to participating retailers who applied to get them before August 6, 2014. The event was held worldwide on Rebellion Day (Saturday, September 13, 2014).
    • Onslaught at Arda I - A military campaign in which the characters are operating out of a secret Rebel base. Includes mass combat rules and new vehicle stats.
    • Friends Like These - The characters have to protect the planet Xorrrn and defend the secret Rebel shipyards there. Includes rules for creating and playing Mandalorian characters.
  • Rules Supplements
    • Stay on Target (Ace Career Book) Adds the Beast Rider, Hotshot, and Rigger Specializations.
    • Desperate Allies (Diplomat Career Book) Adds the Advocate, Analyst and Propagandist Specializations.
    • Lead by Example (Commander Career Book) Adds the Figurehead, Instructor and Strategist Specializations.
    • Forged in Battle (Soldier Career Book) Adds the Heavy, Trailblazer, and Vanguard Specializations.
    • Fully Operational (Engineer Career Book) Adds the Droid Specialist, Sapper, and Shipwright Specializations.
    • Cyphers and Masks (Spy Career Book) Adds the Courier, Interrogator and Sleeper Agent Specializations.
  • Sourcebooks
    • Strongholds of Resistance (Alliance Worlds Source Book)

Star Wars: Force and Destiny[edit]

  • Rulebooks / basic sets
    • Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Beta: Contains the introductory adventure Lost Knowledge and comes with one blank full-color character sheet and six pre-generated illustrated character sheets.
    • Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Beginner Game: Includes a 48-page Beginner's Game basic rule book, 4 pre-generated character folios, 2 downloadable character folio PDF files, a set of 14 Star Wars Roleplay Dice and 8 Destiny Tokens. Also includes the 32-page adventure module book Mountaintop Rescue and the following play aids: a double-sided map sheet (obverse (3 maps): The Valley, The Path to the Ruin, & The Ruin; reverse: The Temple), and 55 character and monster tokens. The Beginner Game basic rule book is limited and lacks the full gameplay and character generation and development rules from the Core Book.
    • Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Core Rulebook: Contains the introductory adventure Lessons from the Past.
  • Accessories
    • Force and Destiny Game Master's Kit: Includes the gamemaster's screen and a 32-page booklet containing the adventure module Hidden Depths. Includes expanded rules for experienced Knight-level play, allowing you to start players off with developed Talents and Force powers.
    • Force and Destiny Career Decks: Decks of cards that can be used as a quick reference tool for players and game masters. Each card shows one of a Career's Talents and a hand of cards (or the whole deck) can be used to remember what Talents a character has and what they do.
Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Guardian Career Decks
  • Force and Destiny: Guardian - Signature Abilities Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Guardian - Soresu Defender Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Guardian - Protector Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Guardian - Peacekeeper Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Guardian - Armorer Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Guardian - Warden Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Guardian - Warleader Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Warrior Career Decks
  • Force and Destiny: Warrior - Signature Abilities Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Warrior - Shii-Cho Knight Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Warrior - Starfighter Ace Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Warrior - Aggressor Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Warrior - Juyo Berserker Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Warrior - Steel Hand Adept Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Warrior - Colossus Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Sentinel Career Decks
  • Force and Destiny: Sentinel - Signature Abilities Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Sentinel - Shien Expert Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Sentinel - Artisan Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Sentinel - Shadow Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Sentinel - Racer Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Sentinel - Investigator Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Sentinel - Sentry Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Seeker Career Decks
  • Force and Destiny: Seeker - Signature Abilities Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Seeker - Ataru Striker Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Seeker - Pathfinder Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Seeker - Hunter Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Seeker - Navigator Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Seeker - Executioner Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Seeker - Hermit Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Consular Career Decks
  • Force and Destiny: Consular - Signature Abilities Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Consular - Niman Disciple Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Consular - Sage Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Consular - Healer Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Consular - Teacher Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Consular - Arbiter Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Consular - Ascetic Specialization Deck
Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Mystic Career Decks
  • Force and Destiny: Mystic - Signature Abilities Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Mystic - Makashi Duelist Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Mystic - Seer Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Mystic - Advisor Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Mystic - Magus Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Mystic - Prophet Specialization Deck
  • Force and Destiny: Mystic - Alchemist Specialization Deck
  • Adventures
    • Lure of the Lost (Star Wars: Force and Destiny - Beginner Game Bonus Adventure)
    • Chronicles of the Gatekeeper
    • Ghosts of Dathomir
  • Rules Supplements and Sourcebooks
    • Keeping the Peace (Guardian Career Book) - Adds the Armorer, Warden, and Warleader specializations.
    • Savage Spirits (Seeker Career Book) - Adds the Executioner, Hermit, and Navigator specializations.
    • Endless Vigil (Sentinel Career Book) - Adds the Investigator, Racer, and Sentry specializations.
    • Disciples of Harmony (Consular Career Book) Adds the Arbiter, Ascetic, and Teacher specializations.
    • Unlimited Power (Mystic Career Book) - Adds the Alchemist, Magus, and Prophet specializations.
    • Knights of Fate (Warrior Career Book) - Adds the Colossus, Juyo Berzerker, and Steel Hand Adept specializations.
  • Sourcebooks
    • Nexus of Power (Worlds Strong in the Force Source Book)

Reception[edit]

Star Wars: Force and Destiny won the Origins Award for Best Role-Playing Game and Fan Favorite Role-Playing Game for 2016.[38]

Star Wars: Edge of the Empire won the Origins Award for Fan Favorite Role-Playing Game for 2017.[39]

Reviews[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Miller, Matt. "Top Of The Table – Star Wars: Edge Of The Empire". Game Informer. Retrieved 10 March 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d e Appelcline, Shannon (2014). Designers & Dragons. '90-'99 : A history of the roleplaying game industry (2nd ed.). Silver Springs, MD, USA: Evil Hat Productions. ISBN 978-1-61317-081-6.
  3. ^ "The Force Awakens Beginner Game". www.fantasyflightgames.com. fantasy flight games. Retrieved 10 March 2021.
  4. ^ "Rise of the Separatists". www.fantasyflightgames.com. Retrieved 2019-10-03.
  5. ^ "Wizards of the Coast Drops Star Wars License". The Haunted Game Cafe. The Haunted Game Cafe LLC. Retrieved July 5, 2014.
  6. ^ Fantasy Flight Games news (April 25, 2014), "Begin Your Service in the Rebel Alliance: The Star Wars: Age of Rebellion Beginner Game is Now Available"
  7. ^ Fantasy Flight Games news (July 3, 2014), "Enter the Age of Rebellion: The Core Rulebook, Game Master's Kit, and Roleplaying Dice Are Now Available"
  8. ^ Hicks, Jonathan (2018-08-15). "Fantasy Flight Games: Announcing a New Era Sourcebook for Star Wars Roleplaying". Fantha Tracks. Retrieved 2019-10-03.
  9. ^ "Available Now – May 9". www.fantasyflightgames.com. Retrieved 2019-10-03.
  10. ^ "Star Wars: Edge of the Empire". Penny Arcade. Retrieved 10 March 2021.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Star Wars : Edge of the Empire roleplaying game : core rulebook. [Roseville, Minnesota]: Fantasy Flight Games. 2013. ISBN 978-1616616571.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Star Wars, Age of Rebellion roleplaying game. Core rulebook. Roseville, MN: Fantasy Flight Games. 2014. ISBN 9781616617806.
  13. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.24-25.
  14. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.54-63
  15. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.111
  16. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.135-153.
  17. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, p.103
  18. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, p.103
  19. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.48-53
  20. ^ Star Wars: Edge of the Empire roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.94-97
  21. ^ Star Wars: Age of Rebellion roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.104-108
  22. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.105-108
  23. ^ Star Wars: Edge of the Empire roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.27-28
  24. ^ Star Wars: Age of Rebellion roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.34-36
  25. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.35-37
  26. ^ Star Wars: Edge of the Empire roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.198-200
  27. ^ Star Wars: Age of Rebellion roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.210-212
  28. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.204-206
  29. ^ Star Wars: Edge of the Empire roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.120-122, pp.204-206
  30. ^ Star Wars: Age of Rebellion roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.131-133, pp.216-219
  31. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.129-131, pp.210-212
  32. ^ Star Wars: Edge of the Empire roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.208-209
  33. ^ Star Wars: Age of Rebellion roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.221-222
  34. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.213-216
  35. ^ Star Wars: Edge of the Empire roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.389-390
  36. ^ Star Wars: Age of Rebellion roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.409-410
  37. ^ Star Wars: Force and Destiny roleplaying game Core Rulebook, pp.399-400
  38. ^ https://icv2.com/articles/news/view/34748/2016-origins-award-winners
  39. ^ https://icv2.com/articles/news/view/37772/2017-origins-award-winners
  40. ^ https://rpggeek.com/rpgissuearticle/164732/lere-de-la-rebellion
  1. ^ "Humans" in the Star Wars universe, like in most fantasy and science-fiction worlds, are a distinct species. There are also humanoid (human-appearing) species, like the Chiss, Twi'lek, and Umbarans, which each have their own species templates. (The human-like Corellian and Mandalorian species, like the Vilani and Zhodani in Traveller, are classified as Human races in the game). The xenophobic Empire refers to such races as "near-humans", treating them only slightly better than the "non-human" (inhuman-appearing) alien species.
  2. ^ The Edge of the Empire's Technician-Mechanic and Age of Rebellion's Engineer-Mechanic specializations have the same Specialization Trees. However, they have different career skills to choose from to depict their different character concepts.
  3. ^ In the Star Wars Expanded Universe, a "Slicer" is a technician trained in breaking into secured computer databases.
  4. ^ The cost of a Talent depends on which row it occupies on the Tree. It costs a multiple of 5 points per row (beginning at 5 points per Talent (1st row x 5 points)) on the first row down to 25 points per Talent (5th row x 5 points) on the fifth and final row).
  5. ^ Originally the early Lightsaber-wielding characters in Edge of the Empire and Age of Rebellion used either Brawn or Agility as a base. This was later clarified to just Brawn when Force and Destiny was released.
  6. ^ Because Star Wars uses Fantasy Violence, Minions don't "die" - they just give a shrill Wilhelm scream and fall over.
  7. ^ Example: Greedo, one of Jabba the Hutt's limb-breaking goons, would be considered a Rival to Han Solo. His motivation is that he's there to collect a debt (and maybe squeeze some extra credits out of Han while he's at it). Too bad he was greedy and stupid enough to threaten Han with a blaster. He might have eventually been used as a recurring foil to either frustrate and obstruct Han or threaten and motivate him without directly involving his boss (Solo's later Nemesis).
  8. ^ Example 1: Boba Fett, a relentless, nigh-unkillable bounty hunter. He is considered a Nemesis because he's dangerous and competent in his own right and is more than a match for most of his bounties.
  9. ^ Example 2:Jabba the Hutt, an interstellar crimelord who rules Tatooine. Han Solo foolishly shot one of Jabba's thugs in a public place and then skipped out on paying his debts. Jabba's motivation is that he wants to punish Solo for making him look weak while making an example of him to deter future deadbeats. Jabba isn't very dangerous by himself, but he has the networking and resources to send Minions and Rivals after Han. Not only that, he has the wealth and influence to buy out the Imperial bounty on Solo's head and hire Boba Fett to deliver Solo packed in carbonite.