Washington State Route 194

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State Route 194 marker

State Route 194
SR 194 is highlighted in red.
Route information
Auxiliary route of US 195
Defined by RCW 47.17.377
Maintained by WSDOT
Length 21.01 mi[2] (33.81 km)
Existed 1991[1] – present
Major junctions
West end Almota Road in Almota
East end US 195 near Pullman
Location
Counties Whitman
Highway system
SR 193 US 195

State Route 194 (SR 194) is a 21.01-mile (33.81 km) long state highway that serves the Lower Granite Dam in Whitman County, located in the U.S. state of Washington. The highway extends eastward from the Port of Almota on the Snake River to an intersection with U.S. Route 195 (US 195) west of Pullman. SR 194 was established in 1991, although the roadway has appeared on maps as early as 1933 and the Almota area being home to a ferry as early as 1893.

Route description[edit]

State Route 194 (SR 194) begins at an intersection with Almota Docks Road, connecting to a grain elevator, and Lower Granite Road, connecting to the Lower Granite Dam. The highway travels north under a rail line owned by Great Northwest Railroad and climbs a hill before turning south in a hairpin turn and turning northeast along a ridge.[3] The road turns southeast and follows Goose Creek through farmland, spanning it four times before intersecting the Wawawai-Pullman Road. SR 194 becomes the Wawawai Road and continues northeast to end at an intersection with U.S. Route 195 (US 195).[4] The eastern terminus of the highway at US 195 is the busiest part of the roadway, being used by a daily average of 740 people in 2011.[5]

History[edit]

The Almota area was a port on the Snake River with a ferry and was home to Chinese laborers working on nearby farmland.[6] The ferry Annie Faxon exploded traveling downstream from Almota to Riparia on August 14, 1893, killing eight people because of a faulty boiler.[7] State Route 194 (SR 194) was added to the state highway system in 1991,[1] but early portions of a road connecting Pullman to a ferry at Almota on the Snake River have appeared on maps since 1933 as a gravel or dirt path.[8][9] The Port of Whitman County was established in 1958 and began developing facilities in Almota after the completion of the Lower Granite Dam in 1965.[10] Shortly after the establishment of the Port of Almota, the roadway was reconstructed, beginning with an improved Wawawai-Pullman Road by 1963.[11] SR 194 was established and written into law as a route from the Port of Almota to U.S. Route 195 (US 195) west of Pullman in 1991.[1][12] Since 1991, no major revisions to the highway's route have occurred.[2][13]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire highway is in Whitman County.

Location mi[2] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 Almota Road Western terminus; continues as Almota Road
21.01 33.81 US 195 – Spokane, Lewiston, ID Eastern terminus; continues as Old Wawawai Road
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "47.17.377: State route No. 194", Revised Code of Washington, Washington State Legislature, 1991, retrieved January 8, 2013 
  2. ^ a b c Staff (2011), "State Highway Log: Planning Report 2011, SR 2 to SR 971" (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, pp. 1190–1191, retrieved January 8, 2013 
  3. ^ 2011 Washington State Rail System (PDF) (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2013. 
  4. ^ Google (January 8, 2013). "State Route 194" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 8, 2013. 
  5. ^ Staff (2011), "2011 Annual Traffic Report" (PDF), Washington State Department of Transportation, p. 154, retrieved January 8, 2013 
  6. ^ Dougherty, Phil (October 3, 2006), "Wawawai -- Vanished Orchard Community of the Snake River", HistoryLink, retrieved January 8, 2013 
  7. ^ Dougherty, Phil (April 9, 2006), "The steamer Annie Faxon explodes on the Snake River, killing eight people on August 14, 1893.", HistoryLink, retrieved January 8, 2013 
  8. ^ Highways of the State of Washington (DJVU) (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally. Department of Highways. 1933. Retrieved January 8, 2013. 
  9. ^ Highways of the State of Washington (DJVU) (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally. Department of Highways. 1939. Retrieved January 8, 2013. 
  10. ^ Paulus, Michael (January 3, 2011), "Port of Whitman County is established on November 4, 1958.", HistoryLink, retrieved January 8, 2013 
  11. ^ Pullman, 1963 (JPG) (Map). 1:125,000. United States Geological Survey. 1963. Retrieved January 8, 2013. 
  12. ^ Washington House of Representatives (1991), Chapter 342, Laws of 1991: State Highway Routes — Revisions To (House Bill 5801)", Session Laws of the State of Washington (1991 ed.), Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature 
  13. ^ Washington State Highways, 2011–2012 (PDF) (Map). 1:842,000. Washington State Department of Transportation. 2011. Retrieved January 8, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google

KML is from Wikidata