Stay What You Are

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Stay What You Are
Saves the Day - Stay What You Are cover.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedJuly 10, 2001
RecordedMarch–April 2001
StudioSunset Sound and Sound Factory, Hollywood, California; Sonora Sound, Los Feliz, California
Genre
Length33:33
LabelVagrant
ProducerRob Schnapf
Saves the Day chronology
Through Being Cool
(1999)
Stay What You Are
(2001)
In Reverie
(2003)

Stay What You Are is the third studio album from American rock band Saves the Day, released in 2001.

Background and production[edit]

While on tour, in March 2000, the band got into a van accident that almost ended the band's career.[1] The van accident was somewhat of an inspiration for the band's song writing.[1] By this point, vocalist Chris Conley "really felt confident" and subsequently had "a lot more fun" while writing.[2] Conley had a personal recording studio set-up where he would "spend the entire day" in "building songs in my own little world."[2] In April, it was announced the band had signed to Vagrant Records[3] due to the success of Through Being Cool (1999).[4] Later that month, Punknews.org reported that the group would release their next album in early 2001.[5] In January 2001, Punknews.org reported that the band was recording with Steve Evetts,[6] who had produced the group's previous two albums.[7]

Recording began on March 17, 2001[8] and continued into April,[9] lasting thrice as long as their preceding two records.[10] Conley described producer Rob Schnapf as "a really mellow, laid back guy. Him being relaxed just made for a nice, creative environment in the studio."[11] Recording was spread over three studios: Sunset Sound and Sound Factory in Hollywood, California, and Sonora Sound in Los Feliz, California. Doug Boehm recorded the proceedings with assistance from Steven Rhodes and Seth Mclain. Josh Turner acted as the Pro Tools engineer during the sessions.[9] Productivity was initially slow due to, as the band explains, "some difficulty we're having with tuning guitars".[12] Richard Barron performed organ on "Cars & Calories". Schnapf and Boehm mixed the recordings, while Don C. Tyler mastered them at Precision Mastering.[9] 13 tracks were recorded in total, including two outtakes "Ups and Downs" and "For Erminie".[12]

Composition[edit]

While Stay What You Are has been tagged as post-hardcore,[13] power pop[13][14] and pop punk,[15][16][13] it saw the band move into post-punk territory, alongside the mixing of emo with the aggressiveness of post-grunge.[17] It was a more mellow, darker and melodic effort than their preceding two albums, drawing comparison to the Promise Ring[18] and Seaweed.[15] Conley said the slower sound was intentional, as the band didn't want to perform fast-paced music anymore and wished to let the melodies carry the songs.[10]

The opening track "At Your Funeral" talks about the death of a friend.[17] "Cars & Calories" talks about celebrity culture. Conley explained that he "felt sort of mildly alienated at different points in my life just looking at culture, especially this hectic, modern culture."[19] Conley wrote the song in an empty room at Vagrant Records' offices. He played open chords, and the rest of the song soon followed.[20] "Jukebox Breakdown" talks about taking liberties when making music and the resultant backlash that comes with it.[21] "As Your Ghost Takes Flight" is about a friend's heroin addiction.[22] "Nightingale" uses distorted vocals.[15] "All I'm Losing Is Me" tackles problems facing Generation X and asks several questions.[17] The ballad "This Is Not an Exit" was compared to "Out of Reach" by the Get Up Kids.[16]

Release[edit]

In early June 2001, an MP3 of "See You" was posted on PopPunk.com.[23] The group embarked on a brief two-week US tour,[8] leading into a few shows in Japan later in the month.[12] After initially planned for release on June 5,[8] Stay What You Are was eventually released on July 10 through Vagrant Records.[12] The group was planned to appear on the Warped Tour,[24] however, they instead headlined the Vagrant America Tour[25] between early July and early September.[26] Partway through the trek, the band appeared at Krazyfest.[27] "At Your Funeral" was released as a radio single in September.[28] Also during that month, a music video was filmed for the song in Los Angeles.[29] It features a creative way of motion control, similar to Requiem for a Dream. Following the Vagrant America Tour, drummer Bryan Newman left the band in September to study at college.[30][31] His position was temporarily filled by Damon Atkinson of Hey Mercedes.[30]

In November and December, the group went on tour with Hey Mercedes, Thursday[32] Whatever It Takes,[33] and Kind of Like Spitting.[34] In late November, the "At Your Funeral" video premiered on MTV2. In December 2001, the band performed on The Late Late Show; the following month, they appeared Late Night with Conan O'Brien.[35][36] In January 2002, the band supported Weezer[37] on the Hyper Extended Midget Tour in the US.[38] In February and March, the band toured with Small Brown Bike and Piebald,[39] which was followed by a supporting slot for Alkaline Trio on their UK headlining tour.[40] In May, a music video was filmed for "Freakish", featuring Muppet-esque puppets.[41] The band supported on Blink-182 and Green Day on their co-headlining Pop Disaster Tour in May and June.[42] On July 15, it was announced that the band had kicked out guitarist Ted Alexander.[43] In August, the band appeared at Bizarre Festival in Germany.[44] In October and November, the group went on a headlining US tour[45] with support from Ash.[46]

Reception and legacy[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4/5 stars[17]
BillboardFavorable[47]
Chart AttackFavorable[48]
DecoyMusic4/5 stars[49]
Exclaim!Favorable[18]
LAS MagazineFavorable[15]
The Morning CallMixed[50]
Ox-Fanzine10/10[51]
Sputnikmusic4.5/5 stars[16]

Stay What You Are sold 14,970 copies in its first week,[52] and 70,000 copies by the end of the year.[53] By March 2002, the album had sold over 120,000 copies,[54] becoming one of Vagrant's best-selling releases.[30] Stay What You Are reached number 100 on the Billboard 200 albums chart.[55]

In the years since its release, Stay What You Are is widely regarded as a classic and a highly influential piece of music for the emo and pop punk genres.[56] It appeared on best-of emo album lists by Houston Press,[57] Loudwire[58] and NME.[59] Similarly, Paste included the video for "At Your Funeral" at number seven of their 10 Best Emo Music Videos list,[60] and the song appeared on a best-of emo songs list by Vulture.[13] Tim Landers of Transit and Brandon McMaster of The Crimson Armada featured the album on their Five Albums That Changed My Life lists.[61] In 2014, the Holophonics released a ska tribute version of the album.[62] Saves the Day played the album in full at FYF Fest in August 2016.[63]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Bryan Newman, Chris Conley, David Soloway, Eben D'Amico and Ted Alexander.[64]

  1. "At Your Funeral" – 3:09
  2. "See You" – 2:08
  3. "Cars & Calories" – 2:45
  4. "Certain Tragedy" – 2:27
  5. "Jukebox Breakdown" – 3:04
  6. "Freakish" – 3:47
  7. "As Your Ghost Takes Flight" – 2:25
  8. "Nightingale" – 3:36
  9. "All I'm Losing Is Me" – 3:22
  10. "This Is Not an Exit" – 3:56
  11. "Firefly" – 2:51

Personnel[edit]

Personnel per sleeve.[9]

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ a b Gadino 2001, p. 62
  2. ^ a b Chamberlain, Rich (May 1, 2014). "Saves The Day's Chris Conley talks DIY roots, cult fame and At Your Funeral". MusicRadar. Future plc. p. 6. Archived from the original on April 12, 2018. Retrieved April 12, 2018. Click on the Next button to look through pages.
  3. ^ Paul, Aubin (April 15, 2000). "Saves the Day are Huge Vagrants". Punknews.org. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  4. ^ Keiper 2000, p. 22
  5. ^ Paul, Aubin (April 30, 2000). "Saves the Day". Punknews.org. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  6. ^ White, Adam (January 3, 2001). "Saves the Day in studio". Punknews.org. Retrieved April 24, 2018.
  7. ^ Roth, Kaj (August 5, 2005). "Saves the day studio report and new collection coming up". Melodic. Archived from the original on November 4, 2016. Retrieved November 3, 2016.
  8. ^ a b c White, Adam (March 3, 2001). "Saves the Day album news". Punknews.org. Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  9. ^ a b c d Stay What You Are (Sleeve). Saves the Day. Vagrant/B-Unique Records. 2002 [originally released in 2001]. 422 860 953-2 DG02/BUN 0017.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  10. ^ a b Harkness 2001, p. 4
  11. ^ Majumdar, Devdoot (November 20, 2001). "Saves the Day". The Tech. Archived from the original on June 2, 2016. Retrieved May 2, 2016.
  12. ^ a b c d "Saves the Day". Saves the Day. Archived from the original on July 7, 2001. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  13. ^ a b c d Nelson, Brad (February 13, 2020). "The 100 Greatest Emo Songs of All Time". Vulture. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  14. ^ Griffin 2006, p. D18
  15. ^ a b c d Steinbacher, John. "Saves the Day Stay What You Are". LAS Magazine. Archived from the original on February 13, 2017. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  16. ^ a b c Athom (February 1, 2009). "Saves the Day - Stay What You Are (album review 2)". Sputnikmusic. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  17. ^ a b c d Wilson, MacKenzie. "Stay What You Are - Saves the Day | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards". AllMusic. Archived from the original on August 28, 2015. Retrieved August 28, 2015.
  18. ^ a b Green, Stuart (August 1, 2001). "Saves the Day Stay What You Are". Exclaim!. Archived from the original on May 4, 2017. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  19. ^ Brodsky, Rachel (October 14, 2013). "Watch Saves The Day's Buzzworthy Live Acoustic Performance Of 'Ring Pop' And 'Cars And Calories'". MTV. Viacom. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 12, 2018.
  20. ^ "Questions and Answers | The Official Saves The Day Website". Saves the Day. Archived from the original on February 20, 2010. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  21. ^ Eberhardt, Thomas (March–May 2004). "Saves the Day The Art And Leisure Club". Ox-Fanzine (in German). Archived from the original on August 13, 2020. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  22. ^ Gadino 2001, pp. 62–3
  23. ^ Paul, Aubin (June 11, 2001). "New Saves The Day Song available!". Punknews.org. Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  24. ^ White, Adam (March 14, 2001). "Saves the Day Off Warped". Punknews.org. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  25. ^ Kot, Greg (September 12, 2001). "Punk Thrives on Vagrant". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on June 10, 2016. Retrieved May 2, 2016.
  26. ^ Tripwire (May 22, 2001). "Vagrant America Tour Signed, Sealed, And Set To Explode". The Fader. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved May 2, 2016.
  27. ^ Heisel, Scott (July 1, 2001). "Krazyfest 4. 'Nuff Said". Punknews.org. Retrieved February 10, 2021.
  28. ^ "Saves the Day". Saves the Day. Archived from the original on October 31, 2001. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  29. ^ Ups & Downs: Early Recordings and B-Sides (Booklet). Saves the Day. Vagrant Records. 2004. VRUK001.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  30. ^ a b c D'Angelo, Joe (January 28, 2002). "Saves The Day Prep For Weezer Tour, Dismiss Detractors". MTV. Archived from the original on August 9, 2016. Retrieved July 22, 2016.
  31. ^ Heisel, Scott (September 26, 2001). "Bryan leaves Saves the Day". Punknews.org. Retrieved February 11, 2021.
  32. ^ "Saves the Day". Saves the Day. Archived from the original on December 4, 2001. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  33. ^ Heisel, Scott (September 10, 2001). "Whatever it Takes opening for Saves The day Tour". Punknews.org. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  34. ^ Heisel, Scott (November 23, 2002). "Saves The Day website relaunch". Punknews.org. Retrieved March 1, 2021.
  35. ^ Kentfield, Matt (January 30, 2002). "Lots to look for as indie labels Vagrant and Drive-Thru Records expand with new releases and large fan base". The Quinnipiac Chronicle. Archived from the original on April 8, 2018. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  36. ^ Heisel, Scott (December 6, 2001). "Saves The Late Night?". Punknews.org. Retrieved February 14, 2021.
  37. ^ D'Angelo, Joe (January 8, 2002). "Weezer To Paint The Towns Green With February Tour". MTV. Archived from the original on August 9, 2016. Retrieved July 22, 2016.
  38. ^ White, Adam (January 3, 2002). "Weezer / Saves The Day tour". Punknews.org. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  39. ^ Heisel, Scott (February 19, 2002). "Small Brown Bike keeps on pedaling…". Punknews.org. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  40. ^ "Tour Diary". B-Unique Records. Archived from the original on March 23, 2002. Retrieved November 5, 2020.
  41. ^ Yago, Gideon (July 3, 2002). "Weezer, Saves The Day Trade Blows In 'Emo Puppet Video War'". MTV. Archived from the original on August 9, 2016. Retrieved July 22, 2016.
  42. ^ "Green Day, Blink Plan 'Pop Disaster'". Billboard. February 14, 2002. Archived from the original on April 7, 2016. Retrieved May 2, 2016.
  43. ^ White, Adam (July 15, 2002). "Grindings from the Rumor Mill - July 15th". Punknews.org. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  44. ^ Heisel, Scott (April 3, 2002). "Vagrant gets bizarre". Punknews.org. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  45. ^ Heisel, scott (August 23, 2002). "Saves The Day, Dashboard Confessional announce fall tours". Punknews.org. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  46. ^ Paoletta 2002, p. 60
  47. ^ Brooks 2001, p. 17
  48. ^ Carman, Keith (December 3, 2002). "CD Reviews: Mariah Carey, Raveonettes, System Of A Down and many more". Chart Attack. Archived from the original on June 30, 2006. Retrieved April 12, 2018.
  49. ^ "Saves The Day - Stay What You Are Review". DecoyMusic.com. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015. Retrieved August 28, 2015.
  50. ^ Terlesky, John (November 17, 2001). "Saves the Day: Stay What You Are and Hey Mercedes: Everynight Fire Works". The Morning Call. Archived from the original on March 19, 2018. Retrieved March 18, 2018.
  51. ^ Schwarzkamp, Jan (September–November 2002). "Saves the Day Stay What You Are CD". Ox-Fanzine (in German). Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  52. ^ Paul, Aubin (July 20, 2001). "Saves the Day makes Billboard 100". Punknews.org. Retrieved February 10, 2021.
  53. ^ CMJ New Music Report 2001, p. 11
  54. ^ Sheffield, Rob (March 28, 2002). "Punk From the Heart". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on March 5, 2004. Retrieved August 28, 2015.
  55. ^ Artist Chart History via Billboard.com. Retrieved July 2007.
  56. ^ Artist Biography via Billboard.com. Retrieved July 2007.
  57. ^ Dupree, Alyssa (June 21, 2013). "A Half-Decade Under the Influence: The Best Emo Albums, 2001-2005". Houston Press. Stuart Folb. Archived from the original on February 25, 2018. Retrieved April 12, 2018.
  58. ^ Waldman, Scott (February 26, 2020). "The Best Emo Albums From 1999-2008: A Discussion". Loudwire. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  59. ^ "20 Emo Albums That Have Resolutely Stood The Test Of Time". NME. Time (UK) Inc. January 14, 2015. Archived from the original on August 16, 2015. Retrieved July 29, 2015.
  60. ^ Laderer, Ashley (February 23, 2017). "The 10 Best Emo Music Videos". Paste. Wolfgang's Vault. Archived from the original on March 18, 2018. Retrieved April 12, 2018.
  61. ^
  62. ^ Crane, Matt (March 31, 2014). "A ska band covered Saves The Day's 'Stay What You Are' in full". Alternative Press. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  63. ^ Grebey, James (March 29, 2016). "FYF Fest 2016 Lineup: Kendrick Lamar, LCD Soundsystem, Tame Impala, Grace Jones, and More". Spin. Archived from the original on May 3, 2016. Retrieved May 2, 2016.
  64. ^ "Repertory Search :: SEASAC". SEASAC. Retrieved January 23, 2016. Click Artist, then enter Saves the Day in the Search field, then click Search Repertory, then click on the individual entries of the Stay What You Are songs for the writing credits.

Sources

External links[edit]