Steak and kidney pudding

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Steak and kidney pudding
Steak and Kidney Pudding.jpg
A small steak and kidney pudding, served with mashed potatoes and other vegetables
TypePudding
Place of originEngland
Main ingredients

Steak and kidney pudding is a traditional British main course in which stewed beef steak and ox kidney is enclosed in suet pastry and slow steamed on a stove top.

History[edit]

An early mention of steak and kidney pudding appears in Bell's New Weekly Messenger on 11 August 1839 when the writer says:

Hardbake, brandy-balls, and syllabubs have given way to "baked-tates" and "trotters;" and the olden piemen are set aside for the Blackfriars-bridge howl of "Hot beef-steak and kidney puddings!"[1]

The first recipe for steak and kidney pudding to appear in print came from Sussex, in a book by Mrs Beeton published by Ward, Lock and Tyler in 1861.[2][3][4] The dish is not markedly older than published recipes of the 19th century.[5][6]

Suet pastry is used to line a bowl into which the steak and kidney mix is placed with onions, stock, etc. A suet pastry lid is then placed on top and sealed tightly. The top is then covered with muslin cloth which is tied round the bowl. This is placed in a covered saucepan and steamed for about four hours or until the pudding is cooked. Some recipes then stipulate making a small opening in the top and pouring rich stock into the pudding ten minutes before serving.

Nickname[edit]

In the slang of the British Armed Forces and some parts of North West England, the puddings are called "babies' heads".[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "What is doing in London?". Bell’s New Weekly Messenger. England. 11 August 1839. Retrieved 19 March 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  2. ^ Cloake, Felicity (1 March 2012). "How to cook the perfect steak and kidney pudding". The Guardian. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  3. ^ Beeton, Isabella (1861). The Book of Household Management. London: Ward, Lock and Tyler. pp. 281–282. kidney.
  4. ^ Fulton, Margaret (2007). Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery: The Complete Kitchen Companion from A-Z. London: Apple Press. p. 506. ISBN 1-84543-229-0.
  5. ^ Grigson, Jane (1974). English Food (1979 ed.). MacMillan London Limited. p. 228. ISBN 0 333 26866 0.
  6. ^ Hyslop, Leah (2013). "Potted Histories: Steak and Kidney Pudding". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 11 January 2016.
  7. ^ Seal, Graham; Blake, Lloyd (2013). Century of Silent Service. Salisbury, Queensland: Boolarong Press. p. 6. ISBN 978-1-922-10989-7.

External links[edit]