Stefan Karpinski

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Stefan Karpinski
NationalityAmerican
Alma materHarvard
Known forJulia (programming language)
Scientific career
FieldsComputer science, Mathematics
InstitutionsNYU
Websitehttp://karpinski.org/

Stefan Karpinski is an American computer scientist known for being a co-creator of the Julia programming language.[1][2][3][4] He is an alumnus of Harvard and works at Julia Computing, which he co-founded with Julia co-creators, Alan Edelman, Jeff Bezanson, Viral B. Shah as well as Keno Fischer and Deepak Vinchhi.[5][6] He also has a part-time appointment at New York University's Center for Data Science as a Research Engineer as part of the Moore–Sloan Data Science Environment.[7][8][9]

He received a B.A. in mathematics from Harvard in 2000,[10] and has completed much of the work on a PhD in computer science from UCSB with research on modeling local area network traffic. He is one of the four main authors of core academic papers on Julia.[11][12] He speaks regularly on Julia at industry events on scientific computing, programming languages, and data science.[9][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20]

In 2006, Karpinski participated in the Subway Challenge,[21] holding for some time the Guinness World Record for the fastest transit stopping at all NYC subway stations.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bryant, Avi (October 15, 2012). "Matlab, R, and Julia: Languages for data analysis". O'Reilly Strata. Archived from the original on May 24, 2013.
  2. ^ Krill, Paul (April 18, 2012). "New Julia language seeks to be the C for scientists". InfoWorld.
  3. ^ Finley, Klint (February 3, 2014). "Out in the Open: Man Creates One Programming Language to Rule Them All". Wired.
  4. ^ Gibbs, Mark (January 9, 2013). "Pure and Julia are cool languages worth checking out". Network World (column). Retrieved February 7, 2013.
  5. ^ "Why the creators of the Julia programming language just launched a startup". VentureBeat. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  6. ^ www.ETtech.com. "Julia founders create new startup to take language commercial | ETtech". ETtech.com. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  7. ^ "Moore–Sloan Data Science Environments". MSDSE. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  8. ^ "Moore–Sloan Data Science Environment at NYU - NYU Center for Data Science". NYU Center for Data Science. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  9. ^ a b "ODSC East 2016 | Stefan Karpinski - "Solving the Two Language Problem"". www.youtube.com. Open Data Science. May 26, 2016. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  10. ^ Karpinski, Stefan. "Resume". karpinski.org. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  11. ^ Bezanson, Jeffrey; Edelman, Alan; Karpinski, Stefan; Shah, Viral (2014). "Julia: A Fresh Approach to Numerical Computing". arXiv:1411.1607 [cs.MS].
  12. ^ Jeff Bezanson, Stefan Karpinski, Viral Shah, Alan Edelman et al. "Research". julialang.org. Retrieved December 20, 2020.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  13. ^ "Julia (Channel 9)". Channel 9. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  14. ^ Erlang Solutions (January 17, 2014), Stefan Karpinski - Julia: Fast Performance, Distributed Computing & Multiple Dispatch, retrieved June 20, 2016
  15. ^ Karpinski, Stefan. "Julia + Python = ♥". Pydate. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  16. ^ Bezanson, Jeff; Karpinski, Stefan. "Julia and Python: a dynamic duo for scientific computing". Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  17. ^ "Julia: to Lisp or not to Lisp?". www.youtube.com. European Lisp Symposium. May 30, 2016. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  18. ^ "PolyConf 15: Julia a fast dynamic language for technical computing / Stefan Karpinski". www.youtube.com. July 11, 2015. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  19. ^ "What's New and Exciting in Julia - Stefan Karpinski". Vimeo. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  20. ^ "Jeff Bezanson & Stefan Karpinski - Julia: Numerical Applications Pushing Limits of Language Design". www.youtube.com. Curry On!. August 3, 2015. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  21. ^ Tomasko, Felicia. "UCSB Grad Student Sets NY Subway Record". Santa Barbara Independent. Retrieved June 19, 2016.